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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So, now that I am 21 and finally able to legally buy a handgun, i was thinking of getting a single action vaquero in .357 to carry while bowhunting, trapping, fishing, hiking, etc, as i am used to single actions as that is the only pistol i shot growing up, and i like how Ruger has the transfer bar. As well, as i work in the woods my boss allows us to CC if we want (but not open carry for public relations purposes), and i may do so during the fall hunting seasons as hunting with a pistol is legal in NH (we are not allowed to go looking for deer on the job, but if we happen across one we are allowed to shoot it, as long as we deduct the time spent tracking and dressing the deer from our timesheets).

While i do prefer the blued version for aesthetics, and the fact that, in my experience with my hunting rifles, blued barrels tend to scratch less, and can develop a nice patina over time when compared to stainless. My only concern is how much extra maintenance the blued version would require (out in all weather that northern NH has, so rain, snow, etc). Obviously if i fell in a lake or whatnot i would strip and clean both well, likewise if i was in the rain i would wipe both down with a clean cloth to remove any moisture, then an oiled cloth to help protect it. With my blued long-guns i find that just wiping it down keeps the rust off of it, with a detailed clean every 2 weeks or so (but those are not being kept in a holster).

Basically, if the blued one gets rained on would i need to fully strip the gun and clean and clean its internal components, or could i just wipe down its exterior at the end of the day (ie are the internal components the same as the SS version / is the actual inside of the barrel SS in the SS version / what is it on the blued, just bare carbon steel?).
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Id also like to note that getting two handguns isnt really affordable for me within the next good couple years, as i tend to plan and budget out large purchases well in advance, and between planning for a new sled, truck, a new rifle or two, etc, my max budget for handguns is around 1-1.2k for the next few years, and i would prefer something that will still look nice and cared for (note a patina counts as nice for me, but not rust / massive pitting / etc), and not like garbage 20 years down the line.
 

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Welcome to the forum. I'm an older guy and have owned handguns for 50+ years. I always opt for stainless steel when it is available in the model that I'm after. Stainless steel isn't rust proof, but it is much more rust resistant than blued steel. I agree that I have always felt that blued steel was more scratch resistant than stainless, but when abrasions and scratches happen stainless steel is much easier for the average owner to repair and bring back to as new appearance. My handguns are stored in a climate controlled environment and it actually takes minimal effort to keep them rust free but I just like the appearance and convenience of stainless steel. This is all just my opinion and others will vary, that's why we still have the choice. :) When you do buy yours, we all appreciate looking at pictures.
 

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I have always treated my blued handguns the same as my stainless never had a problem, that being said for a working gun I would go with the stainless.
 

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Welcome to the Ruger club. Go with stainless but be aware that any finish will get messed up on a regularly carried handgun. Just being in an open top holster that will get dirty and wear away the finish. But with a blued gun you get exposed raw steel, on a stainless gun you just get more stainless. All of my .45 vaqueros except one are stainless. [I shoot cas] These have Blackhawk hammers on them now.
Revolver Trigger Air gun Gun barrel Gun accessory
 

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My vote for a woods revolver is stainless. It still needs care and maintenance but is less prone to rust and easier to remove a scuff. Good luck NHDeerHunter and welcome!
 

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Either will work just fine. I carry blued. Don't mind adding 'character' to my revolvers. Never had them rust on me either in the holster.... But then I don't carry mine 24x7 365 days. Just for the few times I am out in the woods each year.
 
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I have a blued Blackhawk and Single Ten and a SS GP100 and SP101. I maintain them the same way and have not had any rust issues with the blued guns.
I also have 50+ year old 870 shotgun that has been used for waterfowl and upland hunting in all kinds of nasty weather. It's got a lot of character from use and some scratches that will rust, but I keep it cleaned and oiled and any rust is minor surface rust.
I actually prefer blued guns in general. If the exact model was available in blued and SS, I'd buy blued.
 

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Welcome to the forum. I suggest get whatever you like best and plan to maintain it regularly. I have both stainless and blued revolvers. For me, I like my single action revolver to be blued. For double action revolver I like it to be stainless. It’s a personal preference. One thing to note is that revolvers are addictive. You say now that this will be the only one but you know deep down that you’ll want another, and then another, and then another…
 

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Welcome to the forum ! I prefer blued guns and wood stocks or grips, but I think you’d be better off with stainless for your application. I have both but some of mine are only available in stainless. :)
 
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I have a 55 year old blued Blackhawk 357...lives in a mexican leather holster....has no rust...but the blue has rubbed off in a few places....the patina reflects a lifetime of faithful service....is sitting on my night stand as I speak...
 
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