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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
Thanks everyone for the good advice. At the moment i am leaning towards SS, although as i said i am not a huge fan of it from an aesthetic point of view (as well as i could see issues with it being bright and shiny, be it shooting in a high light condition or otherwise. I could always take a high grit sandpaper to the sights though to help darken them, or pay for a light sandblasting to the whole thing to take the gloss off.

I have carried blue handguns into the woods for over 50 years.......Still do and on my boat/ tractor.......NO BIG DEAL.......Just get a good holster.
If i may ask, what region of the (i assume) US do you live / what do you do to maintain it after a outing (where it was not fired)?
 

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I live in the Deep South. It’s hot and humid. To maintain your revolver or any other firearm just keep it wiped down with a very light coat of a good gun oil or lubricant. Some good ones that I like to use are as follows but there are others. To clean the gun bore after firing, I like Hoppe’s #9. For cleaning, lubrication, and protection, I like to use Rem Oil, Breakfree CLP, and Ballistol. Everyone has a favorite but just keep your firearm wiped down with an oiled cloth and then wipe it with a dry cloth. Use a drop of oil on moving parts where needed but don’t put too much. Read your owners manual and it will tell you how and where to use oil and how to maintain your firearm. Don’t keep a heavy coat of oil on it or it will attract dust and dirt. Frequency of cleaning depends on how often it’s used, how dirty it gets, or on a regular schedule. Learn to maintain it and it can last a very long time and bring much enjoyment and use.
 

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All of my Rugers are stainless, except one Single Six 22LR.
I much prefer stainless.
My SASS rifles are all blued, because that is the only way they come.
 

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Another thing too is that the ‘case hardened’ finish of the Rugers is very thin and does not hold up. But this is what I’ve read and while I have one I’ve not shot or carried it very much. Made mine into a pinto.
Everyday carry Knife Utility knife Material property Air gun
 

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My vote is for stainless, While it does cost a little more I feel in my case it's worth it. As others stated it is not rust proof but it will take much longer. And a stainless will look great in your model, set of custom horn grips, maybe stag on stainless.
 

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I carried a stainless 90s era large frame Vaquero in Alaska. 45 Colt Ruger Only rounds were my poor man’s 454 Casul.

Since this is going to be your one and only gun, for now, I would strongly suggest a stainless Blackhawk. 5.5” or 6.5” the extra tube length helps )if you can carry it on your body type and in a way that meets your needs) give you extra sight radius and allows you to adjust for the load you are currently using. The Vaquero with its fixed sights doesn’t always print to point of aim depending on the load velocity, bullet weight, construction, etc.

They also made a version that allows you to shoot 9mm Luger with a change of the cylinder for much less expensive practice with lower recoil.

In my 357 5.5” I used 180 Grain Federals that really had the mass and length to penetrate like a son of a gun especially if you may need to shoot a bear or bigger animal. They were not fun to shoot recreationally when I was young I can only imagine how they would feel now that I am older.

The single action is strong and very safe to carry especially if carried hammer down on an empty chamber.

Even a stainless gun can get character. My vaquero shows it’s honest wear and saw many good times and adventures. I have since moved on to a Smith Model 69 44 Mag, a Glock 20 10mm for my woods gun.
 

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For your purposes the stainless would probably be the best choice. I'm new to stainless guns too but it's nice to not worry about finish wear.
My other handguns and rifles are blued. I carry blued pistols and revolvers and most of the times outdoors, either riding my bicycles or wandering in the mountains. I sweat on them, it rains daily all winter and spring and half of the fall. Never had an issue with rust. I coat my guns with bri- wax and now I use renaissance wax. Don't have to constantly wipe them down with oil. Keeps finger oils/acids and moisture off the metal and really makes the bluing stand out.
 

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Go stainless and treat like blued. Wipe it down and keep it oiled and you will have no problem. Also, don’t store it long term in a holster. Speaking of holsters, to keep your gun looking nice, don’t neglect your holster. That needs to be cleaned and cared for just like your gun. Dirt, dust, and grime in your holster can abrade a gun’s finish. It can also hold moisture against the gun.
 

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Go stainless and treat like blued. Wipe it down and keep it oiled and you will have no problem. Also, don’t store it long term in a holster. Speaking of holsters, to keep your gun looking nice, don’t neglect your holster. That needs to be cleaned and cared for just like your gun. Dirt, dust, and grime in your holster can abrade a gun’s finish. It can also hold moisture against the gun.
This is the way I have always looked at it, very good advice.
 

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If stainless steel had been invented in the 1830s instead of 1913, there likely would’ve been very few, if any, blued firearms. That “traditional” blued look was just the best known way at the time of trying to stave off rust.
 

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I am a SS fan for working/hunting guns. Blue may look better to some, but will not stand up to the usage of SS without showing it.

To those that say they treat both SS and blue finish guns the same and have no rust, I say you are over-maintaining your silver guns.
 

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Blue may look better to some, but will not stand up to the usage of SS without showing it.
And the problem with that is???? Guns are meant to be used ... just not abused. Simple :) . A little character never hurt any firearm that I've used. A blued revovler will last just as long as the SS. So still ... it is a personal preference which way you go.

That said, I treat my few stainless firearms the same as blued. Cleaned and oiled as needed.
 

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If your planning to have it for a while, I'd advice you get a stainless steel, although isn't rust proof, but it is much more rust resistant than blued steel.
My oldest revolver is a blued .357 BH that I've had since I was a teenager (I am 57 now). Not a speck of rust on it, but does have some bluing removed here and there as it was carried a lot back then. All in how you care and use your firearms :) and somewhat where you live I suppose. My grand kids kids kids will still be able to use it far after I am gone from this Earth.
 
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