Ruger Forum banner

1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I have recently purchased a used Mark 3. I disassembled and cleaned it, it took a LOT of effort to get the barrel off. I reassembled it and it worked fine (pulled back the bolt, clicked the bolt release, dry fired, repeat).

I bought a tandemkross hammer bushing and installed it, and put everything back together.

What i notice is that the bolt is extremely hard to pull out, it will budge about 3/4in but then needs help to come all of the way out, then when i release the bolt stop, the bolt goes back and stops just 3/4in from going fully back in the barrel; i have to hit it with my palm to get it to slide back in, then i can dry fire. The hammer strut IS in the mainspring housing because i can feel the springback when i thumb it.

It feels like excessive rubbing is happening between the bolt and barrel. Has anyone else had this issue? Any help is greatly appreciated.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,464 Posts
Help is coming, but having seen this problem in other threads, there is likely a part that went back in upside down. Shouldn't take too long for someone to tell you which part. In the meantime, you may try to disassemble and reassemble carefully.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Help is coming, but having seen this problem in other threads, there is likely a part that went back in upside down. Shouldn't take too long for someone to tell you which part. In the meantime, you may try to disassemble and reassemble carefully.
I have the barrel and bolt out and in the disassembled state i slide the bolt in the barrel and its gets stuck like it does when assembled, i thought it shouldn't have anything keeping it from moving in the barrel freely when its disassembled.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
476 Posts
Legato said:
I have the barrel and bolt out and in the disassembled state i slide the bolt in the barrel and its gets stuck like it does when assembled, i thought it shouldn't have anything keeping it from moving in the barrel freely when its disassembled.
Welcome to the Forum!!

I look at Mark pistols as "kit" guns. They generally run to one degree or another, but it's very common for them to need some additional "finishing" to run every ammo without problems.

Of the various mark pistols I have bought, the MK3s absolutely needed the most TLC. It's frustrating when you expect a pistol you purchase to run right, and it doesn't. For me, a problem pistol is an expectation and I'm "unlucky" enough to be seldom disappointed. Thankfully, I really enjoy working on guns and bringing their performance from dismal to stellar. That's definitely not the case with most owners.

Like you, I figure a bolt should cycle freely in the receiver when disassembled. I start with eliminating as many variables as possible. I strip the bolt completely and hand cycle in the empty receiver (no lower attached). I gently rotate the bolt CW and CCW as well as push a bit up/down and side-to-side. Sources of friction and/or binding become evident pretty quickly.

I repeat once it cycles like it's moving thru air, adding a single variable at a time. First - the bolt stop pin (or a dowel works great). Then the extractor. Then the recoil spring. Then the lower without a magazine. Then with a magazine. Lastly, I hand cycle a loaded mag. (Not a problem until the mainspring is installed.) Each part added shows friction that can't be found when starting with a completely built and loaded gun.

So your observation is super! The problem has nothing to do with the new bushing or anything else in the lower. The only parts you haven't eliminated are the recoil spring, extractor, and the LCI. Personally, I think the LCI is the most likely problem. This stupid "feature" is unique to the MK3 and causes more problems than it solves. I recommend removing it and installing a receiver hole filler asap, even if doing so doesn't end the poor cycling. I'd also expect to find a significant amount of tooling chatter on the bolt that's likely dragging on the ejector. It's a real pain to remove because the bolt is VERY hard. But the smoother the bolt is made, the less ammo picky your pistol will be.

Check a few things like I suggested, and let us know your progress. I have a long list of checkpoints I go thru on my pistols, and they always leave "normal Ruger users" shocked when I let them hand cycle one. Smooth as black ice!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Welcome to the Forum!!

I look at Mark pistols as "kit" guns. They generally run to one degree or another, but it's very common for them to need some additional "finishing" to run every ammo without problems.

Of the various mark pistols I have bought, the MK3s absolutely needed the most TLC. It's frustrating when you expect a pistol you purchase to run right, and it doesn't. For me, a problem pistol is an expectation and I'm "unlucky" enough to be seldom disappointed. Thankfully, I really enjoy working on guns and bringing their performance from dismal to stellar. That's definitely not the case with most owners.

Like you, I figure a bolt should cycle freely in the receiver when disassembled. I start with eliminating as many variables as possible. I strip the bolt completely and hand cycle in the empty receiver (no lower attached). I gently rotate the bolt CW and CCW as well as push a bit up/down and side-to-side. Sources of friction and/or binding become evident pretty quickly.

I repeat once it cycles like it's moving thru air, adding a single variable at a time. First - the bolt stop pin (or a dowel works great). Then the extractor. Then the recoil spring. Then the lower without a magazine. Then with a magazine. Lastly, I hand cycle a loaded mag. (Not a problem until the mainspring is installed.) Each part added shows friction that can't be found when starting with a completely built and loaded gun.

So your observation is super! The problem has nothing to do with the new bushing or anything else in the lower. The only parts you haven't eliminated are the recoil spring, extractor, and the LCI. Personally, I think the LCI is the most likely problem. This stupid "feature" is unique to the MK3 and causes more problems than it solves. I recommend removing it and installing a receiver hole filler asap, even if doing so doesn't end the poor cycling. I'd also expect to find a significant amount of tooling chatter on the bolt that's likely dragging on the ejector. It's a real pain to remove because the bolt is VERY hard. But the smoother the bolt is made, the less ammo picky your pistol will be.

Check a few things like I suggested, and let us know your progress. I have a long list of checkpoints I go thru on my pistols, and they always leave "normal Ruger users" shocked when I let them hand cycle one. Smooth as black ice!!

Thank you for the encouraging words. From what i can tell, the bolt gets hung up just before where the bolt stop pin goes on the barrel; most of the bolt enters freely up to the bolt stop pin hole as well. It looks like the barrel is a bit dinged up and catching the bolt. is it okay to rasp it down? I also took a caliper and measured the barrel opening where the bolt goes and its not quite even all around. We're talking a fraction of a millimetre, but with machined parts that can be significant.

Am I better off finding another barrel or is this something a machinist can repair?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
476 Posts
First, some terminology. The tube that the bolt moves in is the "receiver". The tube that the shell loads into and the bullet travels thru is the "barrel".

I would hesitate to tell anyone to "rasp down" any part of their gun without seeing it first. Maybe you can take a picture of the material you think is catching the bolt and attach it to your reply? (Use the paper clip symbol below to attach.)

Your description of where the hangup is is a little confusing. Your first post made it sound like the bolt hangs up 3/4" from being completely forward against the barrel (called "in battery"). Your last post makes it sound like the bolt hangs up after only having the first 3/4" of the bolt installed (with the receiver removed from the frame). Maybe another picture showing where the hangup is?

Also, have you tried inserting the bolt with the recoil spring assembly removed? Have you checked that the outside edge of the extractor is not extending out past the side of the bolt? Sometimes it's the simple stuff that causes the biggest problems.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
First, some terminology. The tube that the bolt moves in is the "receiver". The tube that the shell loads into and the bullet travels thru is the "barrel".

I would hesitate to tell anyone to "rasp down" any part of their gun without seeing it first. Maybe you can take a picture of the material you think is catching the bolt and attach it to your reply? (Use the paper clip symbol below to attach.)

Your description of where the hangup is is a little confusing. Your first post made it sound like the bolt hangs up 3/4" from being completely forward against the barrel (called "in battery"). Your last post makes it sound like the bolt hangs up after only having the first 3/4" of the bolt installed (with the receiver removed from the frame). Maybe another picture showing where the hangup is?

Also, have you tried inserting the bolt with the recoil spring assembly removed? Have you checked that the outside edge of the extractor is not extending out past the side of the bolt? Sometimes it's the simple stuff that causes the biggest problems.
Thank you again, your help is greatly appreciated! I tried to take a video but am not sure how to post it.

I did notice something important; when reassembled, i can pull back the bolt with some effort, then when i press the bolt stop lever to allow the bolt to slide forward, it stops with 3/4 of the bolt still outside the receiver (thank you for the terminology corrections as well, i'm still learning), then i just tap it in fully with my palm. This is where its extra weird; i can pull the trigger and hear the click, however its only after i pull the trigger twice! the first pull does nothing. it also seems to be harder to pull back the bolt after i each time i try this. This leads me to believe that maybe its less rubbing and more something else. If any of this sounds familiar please let me know.

i'm going to follow bullseyes directions and fully reassemble it again, hoping i missed something. This gun has been a pain in my butt, but some reason i like it more every time i work on it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
617 Posts
"I reassembled it and it worked fine (pulled back the bolt, clicked the bolt release, dry fired, repeat).
I bought a tandemkross hammer bushing and installed it, and put everything back together."

Even if you are convinced the hammer bushing has nothing to do with your problem you should take it out and get the gun back to its initial state just to be sure. And leave the rasp out of it. However it goes please come back and tell us about it and change this thread from a mystery to a lesson.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
537 Posts
...I bought a tandemkross hammer bushing and installed it, and put everything back together...
LG,

Probably a dumb question, but did you remove the mag disconnect/spring during the TK bushing installation?

Ted
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top