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Discussion Starter #1
As a voracious reader, I am always looking for a good book. While I dont read exclusively books of a hunting/shooting nature, at least 85% of my reading is on those topics. As such, I have acquired quite the library on the subject. Rather than subject you all to a long extended list of what I found good and bad, I am drawing a line in the sand and starting with what I am currently reading. Please share what firearm and hunting related books you are reading and what you think of it. Also, if anyone is curious about a book, throw it out there and lets see what others think of it.

*This thread is entirely self-serving as I am always looking for book ideas.
 

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Discussion Starter #2
I am currently reading Gun Notes Volume 2, which is a collection of articles written by Elmer Keith from 1961-1970. Very good read, I always enjoy Keith's articles and his books are very good as well. I am about halfway though the book and I am looking forward especially to the end of the book where there are collections of letters. Volume 1 was equally interesting in the letter department as it included correspondence between Keith and O'Connor. It was very interesting to see how they interacted outside of the public view.
 

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The Book of the Revolver by Grant Cunningham.

Not only all about revolvers, but the section on shooting DA makes you a better DA auto shooter.

Warning: May cause the purchase of revolvers.
 

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< Avid reader here, and maybe my suggestion is off base from what you want since i'm more of a fiction fan vs reading technical stuff, I prefer to learn/entertain from that perspective. so here goes.

One suggestion that will keep you busy is the Emberverse Series by SM Stirling.
(also known as Dies the Fire, which is the name of book #1)

It has an apocalyptic theme, but before you discount it, i'll explain why i'm suggesting it, besides the fact that its awesome.

The theme of the series is that one random day, everything electrical just stops along with combustion engines and gunpowder. Basically civilization is reduced to primitive machines along with bow's and arrows and of course mass panic ensues.

VERY well written, and once the first part (millions die) ends and the last pieces of civilization struggle to survive, it really gets hard core into how they hunt, build, restore whats left using what technology then can still use.

For the first 5-6 books which are easy reads, its very good, then the author gets somewhat into some little bit of supernatural stuff, so its not as good as the first few, but IMO you will really enjoy reading this series. I have all the paperbacks as well as the epub versions (kindle/tablet) and i've recommended them multiple times with no complaints.

I'm not sharing my paperbacks, but if you are a tablet reader, send me a message and I'll see if I can send you the epubs via email or on a SD card/snail mail

I've also read many general survival/prepper type books from the SAS manual to others but its possible that i'm way off base from what you are looking for so i'll stop here for now.
 

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Nothing hunting related but will read a good military service account once in awhile like the Tom Clancy series on the different branches of the service.
 

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I too am a voracious reader. I enjoy fiction and have read all of S. Hunter's Bob Lee Swagger (Bob The Nailer) novels. My true love is military history, particularly 1st person accounts of 20th century warfare. Infantry, Armor, Naval, and Air combat all fascinate me. Amazon has recently published many WWII books available for between $0.99 and $1.30 on the Kindle. I have been in heaven reading accounts of German snipers and machine gunners, Royal Navy sailors, American/German/British fighter pilots and bomber crews, WWI fighter aces, artillery men and more. Some of the most outstanding are Shots Fired In Anger, Flying Fury, Sniper On The Eastern Front, Alarm Starboard!, and Blood Red Snow. I also love a good African safari tale. Hemmingway's Green Hills Of Africa is a classic. Any of Peter H. Capstick's titles (Death In The Long Grass, Death In The Silent Places, Return To The Long Grass etc.) are wonderful reads.
One of the great all time military fiction writer just passed away a couple of weeks ago. W.E.B. Griffin (he also published under many pseudonyms) wrote wonderfully entertaining novels that were well researched and historically accurate. He developed wonderful characters and inserted them into our history while giving insight into many of the real historical figures that shaped the 20th century. I highly recommend the books in the following series: The Brotherhood Of War, The Corps, Men At War, Honor Bound,and the Presidential Agent. I have read them all, and I will miss his writing talent.
 

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I too love to read. I really like good espionage thrillers and military novels.

I also mix in some non-fiction every couple of reads. Lately I've been into western history. I devour anything about Lewis & Clark. Probably read 30+ books about their journey. I've also traveled their trail from South Dakota to Oregon. It fascinates me how they did it and only lost one man.

Theodore Roosevelt is also a favorite author. Not the biographies, but the books HE wrote. He was a prolific writer and wrote a lot about hunting and travel adventures. Hunting the Grizzly, African Game Trails, Hunting Trips of a Ranchman, River of Doubt are the ones I remember off the top of head.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I forgot to mention Man-eaters Of Tsavo. What a hunting story!


That is another great one I have. When you read Col. Patterson’s book it is so much more than just his encounter with the lions the Ghost and the Darkness (I have seen them at the Chicago field museum. They need to be moved out of the basement and placed in a more prominent location IMHO). The book is a biography of his time working on the lunatic line and his hunting adventures.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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I forgot to mention Man-eaters Of Tsavo. What a hunting story!


That is another great one I have. When you read Col. Patterson’s book it is so much more than just his encounter with the lions the Ghost and the Darkness (I have seen them at the Chicago field museum. They need to be moved out of the basement and placed in a more prominent location IMHO). The book is a biography of his time working on the lunatic line and his hunting adventures.


Sent from my iPhone using

Tapatalk
Col. Patterson was an amazing man. An engineer that was forced to become a lion hunter to try to keep his railroad project (Nairobi to Mombasa) going. I have the tee shirt from the Field Museum with the lions on the front.
 

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I’m currently reading Tom Clancy’s Patriot Games.
Next is John Bunyan’s The Pilgrim's Progress. I might add a Robert Ludlum or John le Carre novel to the queue.
 

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I found Tom Clancy's fictional books hard to get into but then almost impossible to put down. Another good book if you study Pearl Harbor is At Dawn We Slept, about 950 pages though and non fiction.

Currently Hand Loader, American Rifleman and Outdoor Photographer as well as various hand loading manuals.
 

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I want to know what people think of the book "Leadership in Turbulent Times", about the presidencies of Lincoln, T. Roosevelt, F. Roosevelt, and Johnson.

I have a theory, but want to know what others see.
 

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Tom Clancy writes some very good stuff like him a lot!!!
All of Clancy's books are great. The Hunt For Red October, Clear and Present Danger, Red Storm Rising, Patriot Games and all the rest. When he started collaborating and co-authoring and was hanging his name on lower quality stuff I quit reading it. Dale Brown and Harold Coyle write good military thrillers too.
 
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