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Exchequer
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Many, many years ago, I read "The Art of Survival". It covers several real-life situations and what the survivors did to stay alive in various climes and locations; from being lost in the desert to lost at sea, the jungle, etc.

Very enlightening and I learned some lessons that have stayed with me for life. ('Tho I don't plan on getting lost at sea or in the desert ....but who does, right?)


 

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Tom Clancy writes some very good stuff like him a lot!!!

Tom Clancy died, years ago. I read his books and liked most, and enjoyed his revealing interview in, Playboy.

I'm reading Wilbur Smith's autobiography, On Leopard Rock.

I've read his adventure books since 1965. Most are set in Africa, and some are based in ancient Egypt. Because he lives in South Africa, I think he may have turned to ancient settings to avoid upsetting the present government. Prior to 1994, he was pretty honest in his accounts of life there.

You can see him in a really good interview from his scenic home near Cape Town, on YouTube. Well worth seeking out. Also see www.wilbursmithbooks.com (Scroll down slightly to see content.)

He's one of the bestselling authors in the world. His gun stuff is sometimes a little off, but is usually more accurate than what 90% of fiction writers manage.

I also follow several detective genre writers. David Lindsey seems to have quit writing, but look for his titles like, Mercy, Spiral, and, A Cold Mind for some of the absolute best fiction you'll ever read. I went to university with him but we didn't meet until years later. He graciously signed all of my copies of his books, to the vexation of the store owner, who was trying to limit signing to books bought that day, in his shop.

I follow John Sandford's series about Lucas Davenport and am glad that Sandford moved from MN to NM. I think he gets a more balanced, less liberal view of life now, and it's reflected in his books. I read his separate Virgil Flowers series, but prefer the Davenport books. Flowers is too much of a semi-hippie type character.

I've read most of the important gun authors and met many. I have several bookcases of their work and a couple devoted to African and Indian hunting. Yes, Jim Corbett and all that. I knew Peter Hathaway Capstick slightly and enjoyed his droll, sometimes macabre, humor and excellent safari accounts.


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From the genre of hunting/adventure the books by Capstick are great reading.
I knew him and will share a cartoon that I sent him. I've kept his reply, on a sheet of blue stationery that folds up to become its own envelope. I like the South African stamp.


The cartoon showed a couple of hyenas standing outside a safari tent. A sign by the tent read, The Millers.

One hyena looked to the other and said, "It's Miller time!" :D

I presume that you're familiar with Miller's old beer commercials?

Peter loved that and sent a very nice reply. I've kept it in one of his hardcover books. My son will inherit those.

I used to write gun and knife and similar material, and have over 5,000 publications. One thing I did was to review books. Of Peter Capstick, I wrote that, "He is perhaps the primary chronicler of safari lore today." You can find that quote in one of his paperback editions, I think in, "Death in the Silent Places." Peter deserved that accolade, and I was pleased to offer it.

I miss him and in a world increasingly critical of hunting, no one has stepped forward to take his place.
 

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Ruger Tinkerer
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Anything about Shackelton's Antarctic expedition in 1914. My favorites are

Shackelton' Boat Journey by Frank Worsley (the captain of the Endurance)

The Endurance by Caroline Alexander

The Shackelton Voyages by Summers/Rowley

An amazing story and one few people seem to know.
 

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Discussion Starter #27
Tom Clancy died, years ago. I read his books and liked most, and enjoyed his revealing interview in, Playboy.

I'm reading Wilbur Smith's autobiography, On Leopard Rock.

I've read his adventure books since 1965. Most are set in Africa, and some are based in ancient Egypt. Because he lives in South Africa, I think he may have turned to ancient settings to avoid upsetting the present government. Prior to 1994, he was pretty honest in his accounts of life there.

You can see him in a really good interview from his scenic home near Cape Town, on YouTube. Well worth seeking out. Also see www.wilbursmithbooks.com

He's one of the bestselling authors in the world. His gun stuff is sometimes a little off, but is usually more accurate than what 90% of fiction writers manage.

I also follow several detective genre writers. David Lindsey seems to have quit writing, but look for his titles like, Mercy, Spiral, and, A Cold Mind for some of the absolute best fiction you'll ever read. I went to university with him but we didn't meet until years later. He graciously signed all of my copies of his books, to the vexation of the store owner, who was trying to limit signing to books bought that day, in his shop.

I follow John Sandford's series about Lucas Davenport and am glad that Sandford moved from MN to NM. I think he gets a more balanced, less liberal view of life now, and it's reflected in his books. I read his separate Virgil Flowers series, but prefer the Davenport books. Flowers is too much of a semi-hippie type character.

I've read most of the important gun authors and met many. I have several bookcases of their work and a couple devoted to African and Indian hunting. Yes, Jim Corbett and all that. I knew Peter Hathaway Capstick slightly and enjoyed his droll, sometimes macabre, humor and excellent safari accounts.


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Thanks for the comments on Wilbur Smith. African politics can always be a touchy subject. Take a look back at some of Robert Ruark's books and writing on the subject. He was called everything under the sun including racist for his critical views on the way that Europe de-colonized the African continent and foretold many of the problems that have risen from the power vacuum.
 

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I knew him and will share a cartoon that I sent him. I've kept his reply, on a sheet of blue stationery that folds up to become its own envelope. I like the South African stamp.


The cartoon showed a couple of hyenas standing outside a safari tent. A sign by the tent read, The Millers.

One hyena looked to the other and said, "It's Miller time!" :D

I presume that you're familiar with Miller's old beer commercials?

Peter loved that and sent a very nicet reply. I've kept it in one of his hardcover books. My son will inherit those.

I used to write gun and knife and similar material, and have over 5,000 publications. One thing I did was to review books. Of Peter Capstick, I wrote that, "He is perhaps the primary chronicler of safari lore today." You can find that quote in one of his paperback editions, I think in, "Death in the Silent Places." Peter deserved that accolade, and I was pleased to offer it.

I miss him and in a world increasingly critical of hunting, no one has stepped forward to take his place.
Very nice memories, and great insight. Thanks for sharing.
 

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Thanks for the comments on Wilbur Smith. African politics can always be a touchy subject. Take a look back at some of Robert Ruark's books and writing on the subject. He was called everything under the sun including racist for his critical views on the way that Europe de-colonized the African continent and foretold many of the problems that have risen from the power vacuum.
In my opinion, Robert C. Ruark was the only knowledgeable, honest American journalist to have covered African politics. In, "Something of Value" and in, "Uhuru", he was both realistic and prophetic about how events would proceed in Kenya. You hit the nail on the head there!

He was also a novelist and a highly successful syndicated newspaper columnist. In later life, he was, Playboy's Travel Editor and published at least one good short story there. If you have access to back issues of that title, maybe at the library, look for his safari article in the March, 1965 issue. I think the main photo of gear was taken at Abercrombie & Fitch in Chicago, back when that was still a top expedition outfitter, not a brand since sold to a women's store chain.

Did you see the film version of, "Something of Value"? I thought it was somewhat miscast and yielded to PC pressures that had already arisen in the movie industry, but was still well worth watching.

Along those lines, check YouTube for a different safari film, "Safari", starring Victor Mature and Janet Leigh. Made in 1956, it describes a white hunter's quest for the treacherous houseboy who killed his son in a Mau-Mau attack. Very well done, with the hunt for a man-eating lion as a secondary plot.

It was made by some of the same people who later made the James Bond films, and Janet Leigh was then one of the hottest actresses. An excellent African adventure film. Here it is:

 

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Here's the Wilbur Smith interview from Cape Town that I mentioned above. Nice home!

You can find additional interviews with him on YouTube, also.
 

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It isn't about shooting, hunting or firearms and it isn't new (1970's) but I highly recommend "The Path Between The Seas" by David McCullough. A fascinating history of the building of the Panama Canal.
 

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I almost forgot.

This one is about different kind of survival.

"You Just Don't Understand:Women and Men in Conversation" by Debra Tanner

Partially responsible for a 56 year marriage.
 

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Discussion Starter #36
On May 14th, the 16th edition of Cartridges of the World will be released. If you havent ever flipped through the book, its an encyclopedia of most cartridges from around the world. It includes current cartridges, obsolete, wildcat, proprietary, etc. Definitely worth checking out. Is it perfect? No, I wish it had some more in depth information in it. Depending on the cartridge, you might find more specific information in a reloading manual. However, as a huge overview of what is and was out there, I dont know of anything better to help you start your research.

Anyway, on to my point. I pre-ordered my 16th edition last night and thought, what the heck, I will flip through one of my old versions just to see what has changed. I grabbed my 8th edition published in 1997 (back when I was in high school) since it was halfway to where we are going to be in a couple weeks. One thing that stood out in the current cartridges section for 6.5mm bore size. Only two were listed, the 6.5X55 Swede and the .264 Winchester Magnum. This was pre-6.5 craze. Pre PRC, pre-Creedmoor. Even the 6.5 Remington Mag was considered dead at that time. It is always interested to look back and compare it to what is popular now.
 

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On May 14th, the 16th edition of Cartridges of the World will be released. If you havent ever flipped through the book, its an encyclopedia of most cartridges from around the world. It includes current cartridges, obsolete, wildcat, proprietary, etc. Definitely worth checking out. Is it perfect? No, I wish it had some more in depth information in it. Depending on the cartridge, you might find more specific information in a reloading manual. However, as a huge overview of what is and was out there, I dont know of anything better to help you start your research.

Anyway, on to my point. I pre-ordered my 16th edition last night and thought, what the heck, I will flip through one of my old versions just to see what has changed. I grabbed my 8th edition published in 1997 (back when I was in high school) since it was halfway to where we are going to be in a couple weeks. One thing that stood out in the current cartridges section for 6.5mm bore size. Only two were listed, the 6.5X55 Swede and the .264 Winchester Magnum. This was pre-6.5 craze. Pre PRC, pre-Creedmoor. Even the 6.5 Remington Mag was considered dead at that time. It is always interested to look back and compare it to what is popular now.
It is a good reference (I have the 13th edition in the other room). It would be even better if it listed the SAAMI &/or CIP pressure limits for cartridges.
 

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Discussion Starter #38
Those are exactly some of the things I wish was included. But it’s still a great starting point for any cartridge research project.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Those are exactly some of the things I wish was included. But it’s still a great starting point for any cartridge research project.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
It also convinces me I need to buy a lot more since I only own things chambered in such a small fraction of the book. :eek:
 

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At least once a year I read the books of Patrick F. McManus. I've done this ever since I first read his stories in Field and Stream in the barbershop back in the early '70s. I still laugh out loud while reading the stories.
 
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