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My book list.

1) Ruger Pistols and revolvers by John C. Dougan

2) Bill Ruger's .22 pistol By Don Findley

3) Ruger and his Guns By R. L. Wilson
 

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Discussion Starter #43
The 16th edition of Cartridges of the World was released today. Haven't looked yet to see what's new, but I expect all the PRC cartridges, etc. will now be included.
 

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One of my favorite hunting books is American Buffalo by Steven Rinella. Aweful lot of history tied to his Alaskan buffalo hunt. Recommend to anyone interested in hunting. Also gives a good view to show how far this county has come in conservation efforts.
 

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Discussion Starter #47
Currently reading Shotluck by Jeff Cooper. Like many of his books, at least that I have and have read, is a collection of his stories and thoughts and wisdom (according to him) on a range of topics. While he is not everyone's cup of tea, I always enjoyed Jeff's writing and wisdom.
 

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At the moment , " Sixgun Cartridges & Loads " by Elmer Keith 1936

A reprint from amazon , under $20.00 , growing up reading his magazine articles and books , soaking up his thoughts like a sponge , this book had always eluded me until reprinted in 2016... I jumped on the reprint .
Yes it was written in 1936 , but there is a lot of wisdom in it.
What alloy of tin and lead to use , velocity , pressure ...these things don't change.
I also just enjoy hearing what Elmer has to say , reading his stories and looking at the the photo's .
For $18.95 it's worth every penny !
Gary
 

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Discussion Starter #50
At the moment , " Sixgun Cartridges & Loads " by Elmer Keith 1936



A reprint from amazon , under $20.00 , growing up reading his magazine articles and books , soaking up his thoughts like a sponge , this book had always eluded me until reprinted in 2016... I jumped on the reprint .

Yes it was written in 1936 , but there is a lot of wisdom in it.

What alloy of tin and lead to use , velocity , pressure ...these things don't change.

I also just enjoy hearing what Elmer has to say , reading his stories and looking at the the photo's .

For $18.95 it's worth every penny !

Gary


That is a good one. It’s amazing how relevant so much of his wisdom still is. Bullets, powders, and equipment might have come a long way since he was doing it, but his wisdom is timeless. If you liked that, read “Sixguns” and his autobiography “Hell, I was there.”


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Discussion Starter #51
I finished "The Wheel of Life" by Bunny Allen. Honestly, it was a bit disappointing. Not enough on hunting and his experiences as a Professional Hunter. The book digressed into a story more about his romantic encounters while on Safari with very little actual hunting stories. I was hoping to read more about the Africa that was, that I will never see and that will never be again from a guy who was there. Oh well, if you are looking at this book, I wouldnt recommend it. I guess there is a reason that if you look it up on Amazon, it is The Wheel of Life: Bunny Allen, A Life of Safaris and Romance. Guess I didnt pay enough attention.
Just starting "The Case for Trump" by Victor Davis Hanson. It was in my stack of to be read and Bald Eagle prompted me to move it to the top of the stack.
 

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When I was younger i read "Joe and Me" and have read it recently again as well. It's mostly about fishing and a young boy who befriends a game warden, but I love the "life" aspect of the book. Great read! And for me "Atlas Shrugged" is probably the best book I have read in my 33 years of life I have lived. I know mine aren't hunting or firearms related but I thought these might add something to the theme of this post perhaps. New here and I hope I am not breaking any decorum with my book choices.
 

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Discussion Starter #54
When I was younger i read "Joe and Me" and have read it recently again as well. It's mostly about fishing and a young boy who befriends a game warden, but I love the "life" aspect of the book. Great read! And for me "Atlas Shrugged" is probably the best book I have read in my 33 years of life I have lived. I know mine aren't hunting or firearms related but I thought these might add something to the theme of this post perhaps. New here and I hope I am not breaking any decorum with my book choices.


Not breaking anything here with your suggestions. Any input is great and only adds to the depth of the discussion. I also have to agree with you on Atlas Shrugged. That book has been instrumental to me in so many ways.

Based on your recommendation of “Joe and Me,” check out Ruark’s classic “The old man and the boy” and it’s follow-up, “the old man’s boy grow older.” Also, take a look at “They used to call us Wardens.” There are two volumes by Bill Callies. Sounds like they might be right up your alley and welcome to the forum from Michigan if I have not previously welcomed you.


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I can't read or write ….. but I can trace!

I'm always looking for anything concerning John M. Browning. Currently looking for "American Gun Maker".
 

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When I was younger i read "Joe and Me" and have read it recently again as well. It's mostly about fishing and a young boy who befriends a game warden, but I love the "life" aspect of the book. Great read! And for me "Atlas Shrugged" is probably the best book I have read in my 33 years of life I have lived. I know mine aren't hunting or firearms related but I thought these might add something to the theme of this post perhaps. New here and I hope I am not breaking any decorum with my book choices.


Not breaking anything here with your suggestions. Any input is great and only adds to the depth of the discussion. I also have to agree with you on Atlas Shrugged. That book has been instrumental to me in so many ways.

Based on your recommendation of “Joe and Me,” check out Ruark’s classic “The old man and the boy” and it’s follow-up, “the old man’s boy grow older.” Also, take a look at “They used to call us Wardens.” There are two volumes by Bill Callies. Sounds like they might be right up your alley and welcome to the forum from Michigan if I have not previously welcomed you.


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Thanks for the reassurance, everyone is so friendly here I didnt want to break any decorum written or otherwise. I will take those suggestions and read them! If they are anything like Joe and Me they will be right up my alley. And I'm always happy to interact with another Atlas Shrugged fan, Rand's works (all of them) pretty much changed my life and said everything I always felt, just never was able to articulate. Who is John Galt? Or actually where is he? Thanks again for the welcome and for the suggestions!
 

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Discussion Starter #57
My wife and I had a dinner with another couple on Saturday. Our hosts have an 11 year old son. I brought him the book Johnny Tremain. I just hope he is not too far past it as he is a smart kid and a big reader. I dont know how many times I read that book in my pre-teen days. I went from that book to Louis L'amour. Got some strange looks in Jr High doing book reports on his books but I digress.

I have a copy of that book for my boys for when they get older along with a couple other series. I have the full series of Rush Revere books and The Tuttle Twins series. Those I am able to start reading a bit to my 3 year old. I have also been slowly acquiring as many of the classics as I can. I started doing this years ago, even before I was married. I was listening to talk radio and someone was talking about a "new" edition of The adventures of Huckleberry Finn was coming out with some of the language cleaned up for today's world (think Jim's adjective). So, I thought, if this is what literature is coming to, I need to get copies of as many of the classic books as possible, because who knows if the original versions will be available in later years. I think the classic stories need to be read in their original form, as the author intended, and that opens the door to discussion.
 

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A book which is central to my collection of reference works is Phillip Sharpe's The Rifle in America; it covers from flintlock to late 1930's (post-WWII rifles in the third edition), with copious photos and detailed information & descriptions.

I occasionally see copies on gun show tables at reasonable prices; his book on reloading is scarcer, though - I've been looking for a copy for quite a while.
 

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On the fiction side, I have thoroughly enjoyed the Bob Lee Swagger series. The movie "Shooter" adapted from the book by Stephen Hunter and is one of the series. Most of Stephen Hunters stuff is entertaining.

Doh, upon further reading he has been recommended multiple times!

Stephen King's Dark Tower series is very good with an epic good guy "The Gunslinger"
 
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