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taking the brand new never been fired mini 30 to the range Saturday , any advice for day one use ? First time with a brand new rifle
 

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Field strip, clean, lube. Reassemble. ALWAYS. Even when it's just nee to you.

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I own two of them. Not much break in needed, especially the newer 580 series.
If it helps, I use Ruger brand 5 rd and 20 rd magazines.
Winchester brass, loaded with .310 dia soft point bullets.
My new one has a Leupold scope and it shot tighter groups than my bolt action 270.
 

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I own two of them. Not much break in needed, especially the newer 580 series.
If it helps, I use Ruger brand 5 rd and 20 rd magazines.
Winchester brass, loaded with .310 dia soft point bullets.
My new one has a Leupold scope and it shot tighter groups than my bolt action 270.
All I could get my hands on was some wolf for now . You wouldn’t recommend field stripping it and cleaning , lubing a brand new one ? Got 2-5 round mags and a 10 (max for mass)
 

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Brand new , I should still strip it down and clean , lube ?
Yes, Standard procedure with any new gun. And like I said my original post, any gun new or used to you.

New guns have oils or grease for shipping and storage. That need to be cleaned out . You then re-oil or grease with your favorite.

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Clean all the factory grease off with some Powder Blast or the like. I'd recommend cleaning out the firing pin channel in the bolt whenever you do a complete breakdown, but breakdown of the bolt is not the easiest thing to do. That extractor plunger is a bear to depress, small and slippery. Once the extractor plunger is pushed down enough the extractor and then the firing pin will slip out.
The only two likely parts that might break on a Mini-30, from shooting cheap steel case ammo, are the firing pin and extractor. Knowing how to change them, and having a spare is the most important thing you need to know.

You can put a drop of oil where the trigger and hammer pivot, and a drop where the mag release pivots.
Put a few dabs of grease in the rails where the bolt rides.

When you go to take down your new Mini, make sure the hammer is cocked back and put the safety on. Trying to pop open the trigger guard on an uncocked gun can tweak the trigger guard where it doesn't snap back easily.
Putting the safety on ensures that if you accidentally pull the trigger the hammer doesn't snap forward.

In order to remove the bolt, it is much, much easier if you first remove the bolt stop plate and bolt stop on the side of the receiver by the serial number. There is a spring and plunger there, take it out while working on the gun so you don't lose it.

The bolt is removed by twisting it as you lift up. When you go to put it back in, it helps to slide the firing pin back so the end of the firing pin can go through the notch in the receiver.

When putting the recoil spring back in, make sure that the pointy end of the guide rod inside the spring is pointing UP towards the handguard. If you put the guide rod in with the pointy tip down, the carbine will cycle roughly and the bolt won't come back far enough.

Wolf or Tula is NOT going to be the most accurate, cleanest or easiest for the Minis firing pin to ignite.
But I can understand that right now it might be all you can get.
Mini-30s come with different firing pin lengths (protrusion out of the bolt face is what is important).
You might get lucky and have a Mini that has enough protrusion to reliably ignite any and all Russian ammo.

If your get some failures to fire with Wolf or Tula, don't despair.
First, make sure there is not a raised ridge on your bolt face around the firing pin hole. That ridge is sometimes left over from the manufacturing process and effectively reduces your FP protrusion. If there is a ridge remove it.
I would next recommend getting a $38 firing pin protrusion gauge from Brownell's so you aren't guessing.
A protrusion of .035 to .040" will set off American or European brass cased, Boxer primed ammo but will suck at setting off Russian Berdan primed stuff.
.042" is better but is barely enough.
If you want your Mini to reliably set off anything, best to order a longer pin from firingpins.com and fit it to a protrusion of .044" to .046". Going longer is not advised as Bpxer primed ammo like Federal American Eagle or PPU could have the primers pierced.

A new longer fitted pin is the correct solution. Don't listen to guys that tell you to install a heavier hammer spring.
The FP is limited as to how far it can go inside the bolt, smacking a too short pin harder will only result in stressing your factory pin and shortening its life. it's protrusion that matters.
You might find that you get no misfires with your new Mini, that would be great. But if you do have problems, do the above.

Not all Russian ammo is equal either.
Red Army Standard or Golden Tiger (same thing, different packaging) are much easier to ignite than Wolf or Tula.
Silver Bear is better yet, almost as easy to ignite as brass case Domestic ammo.
With a stock FP, I would get 12 -15 rounds out of 100 of Tula that wouldn't fire.
With Red Army Standard (RAS) I get 1 or 2 out of 100 that fail.
With Silver Bear, I've never had one fail to ignite after 500 rounds.
Silver Bear is much cleaner and the most accurate of the Commie ammo I've tested as well.

For not much more than what cheapo Wolf and Tula will cost you, you can get brass case reloadable stuff like Geco or Fiocchi. They are accurate, but underloaded, don't expect full 2400 fps velocities.

For Mini-30 magazines, don't waste you money on aftermarket ones. Stick with Ruger factory mags.
I haven't tried the 10 rounders yet, but I have 12 of the 20 rounders (for 2 Mini-30s) and I keep a couple of the 5 rounders for range use and to be legal for hunting.
If you can find them the KCI 30 rounders are excellent and built like a tank. They aren't imported much if at all, so you have to look on Gunbroker ( a guy named Downslope sometimes sells them), or E-Bay or the forum classifieds.

I'd avoid Pro-Mag, Ramline, etc. For every guy that says they like them, you'll have 10 that say they are junk.
These are some Ruger 20 round mags that I've Cerakoted grey to make them rustproof and more durable.

Enjoy your new Mini and let us know how the range trip goes.
 

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If this rifle is to be some pampered range toy then yeah, do all that stuff to it. But if it is to be a utility rifle/truck gun/saddle rifle/defensive weapon then it should function out of the box with less than perfect maintenance. And really, what's the point of a 7.62X39 rifle that can't eat cheap, steel cased ComBloc style ammo?
 

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Prise, I do nothing to any of my rifles that would make me worried about it's reliability. 24 years in the Infantry taught me that.
Far from being pampered range toys, my confidence in my two Minis led me to ignore all my other platforms to the point of selling most of them.

I put out all of the above info "in case" Frank or another new Mini-30 owner needed to go that far.
No one that knows about Mini-30s would go so far as to claim that every single one out of the box will function 100% with cheap steel case ComBloc ammo. If someone claims that any new Mini-30 will, or should, function out of the box with any steel case, then that tells me, and any others that are experienced with them, that they no little about them.
Not all of them come out of the factory with sufficient firing pin length, hence the misconceptions and sometimes bad reputation of Minis.

Google problems with Mini-30s and steel case ammo or search here or on perfectunion forum if you deny that there is a problem.
Some, but not all will balk with deeper seated Berdan primed ammo. Ruger TELLS THE OWNER NOT TO USE IT.
It has always been Ruger's policy, and the manual states it, to use "Only Domestic (Boxer primed Brass ammo).
Whether you like that or not, that is the case. If a new or bought-used Mini-30 feeds everything, that's just great.
But if it doesn't, and you want a lightweight, handy reliable hard hitting carbine like the Mini that will fire any x39 ammo, just do what it takes (the longer pin mentioned above ) and be done with it.

If you aren't willing to do that, just buy something else and let us enjoy our Minis.
 

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"Not all of them come out of the factory with sufficient firing pin length, hence the misconceptions and sometimes bad reputation of Minis."
Ah so! I think this one change could have increased Mini 30 sales significantly. I know I may have bought one instead of the Romanian AK in the days when 1000 round cases of 7.62 were going for $100 per.
 

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Ruger might be finally coming around, I have heard more reports of new Mini-30s coming with a decent FP length.
Remember, it only took them 30 plus years to listen to customer requests for a heavier barrel Mini !
 

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Just give it a good cleaning before you go to the range.Enjoy your day at the range.(y)
 

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Break in procedures at the range are tiresome, but will pay dividends afterwards. Fire 1 round, punch the bore with a brush dipped in solvent, then run a patch down the bore. Do this for 5 rounds. For the next 10 rounds, fire 2 rounds, then brush and patch. The last 10 rounds are fired in groups of 5, then brush, and patch. For very accurate rifles, especially target , or long range guns, the drill is the same, except doubled. This is basically the break in procedure recommended by barrel makers.
Good luck
 

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Barrel break in procedures listed above are great for a precision varmint or benchrest bolt action rifles, but breaking in the barrel on a Mini is not what the focus should be. Minis are 2-3 MOA carbines at best.
What you are wanting to break in on a Mini is the action, shooting enough rounds so that the bolt "wears" in to the receiver. The way to do that is to just go out and shoot a few hundred rounds through it.

If your Mini has had several hundred rounds through it and is still not reliable with brass cased ammo, send it back to Ruger.
BTW, if you desire to fire steel case through your new Mini-30 and find out it doesn't do that, fit the firingpins.com pin to it, and now it will fire anything 100%.
The pins are quality heat treated steel and every bit as durable and well made as the factory pin, just longer.
Fitting the new pin makes it an awesome carbine that will fire any ammo that you run across, even cheapo Tula and Wolf.
Making that new Mini even better does not in any way make it "pampered" or a strictly range toy.
 

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If this rifle is to be some pampered range toy then yeah, do all that stuff to it. But if it is to be a utility rifle/truck gun/saddle rifle/defensive weapon then it should function out of the box with less than perfect maintenance. And really, what's the point of a 7.62X39 rifle that can't eat cheap, steel cased ComBloc style ammo?
No reason at all not to take care of a firearm.

Idiotic not to field strip, clean and lube a brand new gun.

I have known of misfires with AK's, 7.62x39 AR's,SKS's, etc. with the cheap foreign ammo. If someone wants to put corrosive primer ammo in their rifle, fine. If someone wants to shoot lacquer coated steelcase that will leave a hard to remove residue, fine.

I will shoot ammo made in the US or Israel, with the exception of Fiocchi which is good quality, in my rifles. No corrosive primers, no lacquer. But then I intend for my firearms to be handed down to subsequent generations.

Break in on a Mini? Shoot it. Take it home and clean it.
 

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Ruger might be finally coming around, I have heard more reports of new Mini-30s coming with a decent FP length.
I can attest to this. I recently bought a new Mini-30 and it shoots cheap steel cased ammo just fine. I was leery of buying another Mini-30 but I like the platform so much I decided to give it another chance. I know about the problems some Mini-30 owners have had but I knew that going in and decided I would deal with them if necessary. I much prefer a Mini-30 over an AK and AK platform rifles don't function perfectly either. All I did was run a bore snake through the barrel, apply a couple of drops of CLP to the bolt and went out and shot it. No problems at all. I had a few Ruger magazines left over from my last go around with a Mini-30 and I was still able to buy a couple more from a LGS. Overall, I'm extremely glad I decided to give the Mini-30 another try. Great little rifles.
 

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To each his own on break in. That is the "short and fast" breakin. For hunting I would double that, and if a serious long range shooter, or competitor, I would probably triple that. That is the break in procedure recommended by several barrel makers. Once that is done, a few mag dumps will help settle in the action. From there, it's just time and rounds fired. My methods, maybe not yours. YMMV 🙂
 

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I'm not a believer barrel break-in and not all barrel manufacturers believe in it either. None other than Mr. Gale McMillan himself said it's mostly bunk. YMMV
 
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