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I just got a brand new SR40C for Christmas and while shooting it for only the second time at the range, the accuracy started to get off.

Checked the sites and everything was fine. It wasn't until about 75 rounds in we noticed the slide spring sticking out the end. I stopped shooting and took it right away to the dealer who found the problem; half of the metal "lip" that the slide spring sits in broke off.

Ruger is being really cool and immediately sent me a return UPS tag and RMA number and said 2-2.5 weeks I should get it back either with the part replaced or a whole new gun.

The dealers gun smith thinks it's either due to a bad piece of metal or they milled the area out just a bit too much and made it week.

Just thought this would be helpful.



 

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Ruger does certainly stand behind their products. It keeps me coming coming back.
Some simple quality control would of caught this with a gap tool.

Don't get me wrong I love my ruger. But had a very similar problem with my P95 and my gun store and gunsmith have see a higher than normal percent of new guns coming back for them to inspect and send to Ruger. This doesn't count the guys who contact and ship directly to Ruger.
But I'm watching them.
 

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Ruger might take care of you , but how long will it take. One of the magazines supplied with my new P345 is very hard to load the last 8 round and when you rack the slide the round fails to feed. I tried e-mailing a week ago, no reply. Tried calling at leats 20 times at all hours and never spoke to a human.
 

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Ruger will set it right, best CS around.
 

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I used to work for a Fortune 50 company, so I can guess why Ruger (and most other gun manufacturerers) does not do more quality assurance. To inspect every part and test every mechanism would add lots of time and labor into the production processes -- and all of that is expensive (fewer guns at higher costs per unit). The alternative, which they have taken is to have the consumer do the final inspection -- and if there is anything wrong, they fix it on their dime. By far most of the guns are fine -- and the price point can be kept lower. Works for me.
 

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I used to work for a Fortune 50 company, so I can guess why Ruger (and most other gun manufacturerers) does not do more quality assurance. To inspect every part and test every mechanism would add lots of time and labor into the production processes -- and all of that is expensive (fewer guns at higher costs per unit). The alternative, which they have taken is to have the consumer do the final inspection -- and if there is anything wrong, they fix it on their dime. By far most of the guns are fine -- and the price point can be kept lower. Works for me.
Exactly. And if it keeps the price low, I can deal with that.
 

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Been seeing alot of posts like this lately.....
Its almost like ruger, is sending out this crap on purpose, hoping the owner will over look these defects. This one seems like it was a slide that was sent back because it rattled and they tried to fix it and use it on another gun ????
or is it just me ??
 

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Ruger must not be doing this, every time i go buy the gun shops, any Rugers in the case are more expensive :(
Really? That's odd, they are staying low here.
 

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More expensive than what? The only cheaper guns around here are some Smith and Wessons and the Kel-Tecs.

Jeff
And it's only the low end Smith and Wessons.
 

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I haven't seen a Ruger pistol in a display case since early November. They have all been snatched up.
Plenty in Australia..... ;) :D
 

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Almost all the pistols that Ruger ships are fine. There are a few that have a problem. I am imagining that Ruger uses modern statistical quality control techniques, which does two things:

1. It keeps defective products shipped to a low level and eventually results in a correction of any recurring manufacturing problem or error.

2. Since it is not a 100% inspection regime, once in a while a defective product will ship.

Almost all modern manufactured goods are QCed this way and experts generally agree that statistical quality control is the way to go. It is ALMOST as effective as 100% inspection and far, far less costly.

My $.02.
 
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