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I have a Ruger Vaquero in 45 Colt. I keep it meticulasly clean and had the chamber throats opened up to match the bore. All my brass that I reload is within specs. Problem: when cocking the hammer the brass rubs on the recoil plate sometimes to the point of stoppage. There is also alot of sooty blowback on frame and cylinder. I reload using H-110 mild loads. Any thoughts?
 

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I have a Ruger Vaquero in 45 Colt. I keep it meticulasly clean and had the chamber throats opened up to match the bore. All my brass that I reload is within specs. Problem: when cocking the hammer the brass rubs on the recoil plate sometimes to the point of stoppage. There is also alot of sooty blowback on frame and cylinder. I reload using H-110 mild loads. Any thoughts?
There is no such thing as a mild load with H110. H110 is a magnum powder and needs a certain amount of pressure to burn clean. Have you checked the OAL of your finished loads? Something has to be pushing the bullet back into the recoil plate. Moreover if the bullets were just falling back in the cylinder they all would be pressing back on the recoil plate.
 

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What's your headspace? The brass SHOULD rub on the recoil shield and plate, that's the controlling dimension for headspace. If your headspace is too tight, then you may need to send it back to Ruger. The recoil shield and plate keep the brass pressed into the chambers, that's their job - they NEED to be close enough to do that job.

At the other end, revolvers have b/c gaps, and b/c gaps lead to dirty frames and cylinders. If your b/c gap is excessive, then you'd need to set back your barrel, or, again, send it back to Ruger for replacement.

I do tend to agree, there's really not a lot of opportunity to make true mild loads with H110/W296. If you're running a sub-starting load, then it's quite likey your load is burning poorly, and dirtier than it should be.
 

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Another possibility is that your bullet choice may be a factor along with possibly undersized chamber throats.

Many of Ruger's .45 Colt chambers have considerably undersized throats. A bullet with a "full diameter" shoulder ahead of the case mouth can hang up on the throat edge and prevent full-depth cartridge insertion.

If you cannot slip one of your bullets into the front of the cylinder chamber without difficulty, this may be your problem. The throats on .45 Colt chambers should be 0.4525" diameter, but many of Ruger's aren't . . . nor are they round, either.

I've experienced this situation with more than one Ruger .45 revolver, and having the throats reamed to proper size fixed the situation. This may not be your problem, bit it's something to check out anyway as proper throat sizing helps eliminate leading and other problems.

Good luck, and welcome to the party.

:)
 

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I ran into a similiar issue with my DA/SA gp100 when i first purchased it, sort of. I had bought some pmc ammo, brass case to shoot in it. Well it would rub and made cocking the hammer tough to cock is SA. Come to find out the primers were not seated deep enough by the factory. So I pulled the remaining bullets, removed the powder, and hand primed them a little deeper. Then reloaded the rounds with new powder and bullets. Problem solved. The primer was what was rubbing on the rear of the action. Since I reload as well, I make sure I use my uniformer to make sure my primer pockets are deep enough, and have had no issues since over a year or so. So that may be a possibility, I never expected that from factory ammo.
 

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Another possibility is that your bullet choice may be a factor along with possibly undersized chamber throats.

Many of Ruger's .45 Colt chambers have considerably undersized throats. A bullet with a "full diameter" shoulder ahead of the case mouth can hang up on the throat edge and prevent full-depth cartridge insertion.

If you cannot slip one of your bullets into the front of the cylinder chamber without difficulty, this may be your problem. The throats on .45 Colt chambers should be 0.4525" diameter, but many of Ruger's aren't . . . nor are they round, either.

I've experienced this situation with more than one Ruger .45 revolver, and having the throats reamed to proper size fixed the situation. This may not be your problem, bit it's something to check out anyway as proper throat sizing helps eliminate leading and other problems.

Good luck, and welcome to the party.

:)
I agree 100% with this statement. Any revolver I plan to keep I send it to a gunsmith to be reworked. One of the things the gunsmith does is ream and chamfer the cylinders. Gunsmiths use a tool that reams the cylinders perfectly every time. You can ream your cylinders at home with a wood dowel and sand paper. You will get usable results but you will have some variation in each and every cylinder.
 

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I have a Ruger Vaquero in 45 Colt. I keep it meticulasly clean and had the chamber throats opened up to match the bore. All my brass that I reload is within specs. Problem: when cocking the hammer the brass rubs on the recoil plate sometimes to the point of stoppage. There is also alot of sooty blowback on frame and cylinder. I reload using H-110 mild loads. Any thoughts?


Does factory ammo have the same effect? If not, the gun is fine and it's your reloads.



Jeff
 

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It's pretty easy to tell if you have a throat/bullet size issue. If the cartridges drop in fully to allow the rim to rest against the cylinder, then you're not having a throat fit issue.
 

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The original poster said he had the throats reamed to bore size already.

Sounds like his reloads may have a few high primers. Maybe not enough crimp, allowing some bullet jump out, causing case push back and a tight fit? WAG!

Have to agree. No such thing as mild H110 loads. I shot H110 in my .45 Colt Blackhawk years ago. What a flamethrower it was at an indoor range I used to frequent. Same with WW296. Split almost every case down the sides with WW brass. :eek: Gave up on magnumizing .45 Colts after that!
 

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It's pretty easy to tell if you have a throat/bullet size issue. If the cartridges drop in fully to allow the rim to rest against the cylinder, then you're not having a throat fit issue.
Obviously. But if someone is not watching closely he might miss this situation. That's why I mentioned it.

:D :D :D
 

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I think you all are making it way too difficult. Not enough information from the OP by the way. New gun, old gun, modified? Did it ever work right, or when did the problem happen?

Simple matter to see if you have a throat issue or an issue with OAL of reloaded cartridges. (You should of course have already measured your OAL with your calipers.) Just plunk in plain brass cases into the cylinder and see if they rub.

It sounds to me like the OP is having the latter problem which is too little headspace. Put another way, the distance between the rear of the cylinder and the recoil shield is too small. If that is true, it is time for a little vacation to the factory.

Put those plain cases in the chambers. Get out your automotive feeler gauges and find the one that will fit into the gap between the case head and the recoil shield. Post the number.

Eor
 
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