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I have been dry fireing my new Blackhawk Bisley and the transfer bar broke. Only has 30 rounds through it. Anyone else had this happen?
 

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Gosh no! I'm not aware of any stories about that piece failing but I guess it's like anything else - stuff happens..

Call Ruger. The might just send another. There's no fitting involved, in fact new GP100 owners frequently post that their new guns rattle. It's the transfer bar sloping around.

Call Ruger. I'm sure they'll make it right.
 

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They can break over time. Only 30 dryfires does indicate a fault with the part. Call Ruger.
Ruger will most likely send you a new one for free.
I still use snap caps myself, even in my Rugers
I get a little more comfort knowing that there is actually something there for the firing pin to hit upon as it's design was intended to to.
 

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Happened on my 45LC Bisley when it was new. It is not a fitted part, so Ruger can just send you a new one. Give them a call. Mine is fine now.
 

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Had it happen to my .357 Blackhawk (80s vintage) just a few months ago while doing some tests. So even happens to the older ones after lots of firing. Replaced and all good. Have a couple 'extra' now laying in my cabinet to keep Murphy at bay.

Call Ruger as suggested. They'll take care of you.
 

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It's not common ... we are just the unlucky few..... Mine happened while I was testing loads at the range. Put an immediate stop to my testing.... Hate to have have Murphy get involved when facing a charging Moose ... or Bear..... So I now relieve the hammers on mine if needed.... Just in case :) . No I don't dry fire hardly at all either. I was brought up to 'not' dry fire any guns.
 

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...No I don't dry fire hardly at all either. I was brought up to 'not' dry fire any guns.
What never? Well, hardly ever! I too was taught to never dry fire any gun. Then I grew up and bought my own guns. I took the time to read the manual from Ruger, it states clearly that its OK to dry fire, so I do.
 

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That is, of course, up to you :) ... I read the statement too in the manual. I fully understand how a Ruger works as well... but I personally don't see any need to do any dry firing, so I don't ... except a few times just after a trigger job and then I usually put my thumb in-between. Just me :) .
 

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... but I personally don't see any need to do any dry firing, so I don't ... except a few times just after a trigger job and then I usually put my thumb in-between. Just me :) .
Same upbringing. Always amazes me to see a 'shopper' at a gun shop cock & dry fire a gun.

I either use my thumb or stick a foam ear plug in-between if I'm testing a trigger pull.

Have 3 Rugers with the TB's and all good - so far. Have 2 w/out and never plan to have those modified.
 

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I dry fire to gain familiarity with the individual gun's trigger characteristics and help break in the trigger. I've heard that Appleseed specifically recommends dry firing to help become a better shooter.

It appears you two have issues with dry firing, as if dry firing is bad manners, like farting in church. But if there's no bad effects to the gun and the manufacturer specifically states it's OK, what's the big deal?

Some transfer bars fail after 30 trigger pulls, some fail after a few thousand trigger pulls, dry firing isn't the issue with transfer bars breaking. Poor design/tolerances are the cause. It is worrying to me, a single point failure will prevent the gun from firing, not good for hunting or protection.
 

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After reading this post I ordered a transfer bar from Midway just incase .
 

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Back when I used to shoot in M-1 matches an old timer by the name of Norm Ricci gave me some good training tips. Among them was to practice dry firing at a small target. It was amazing how my scores crept up, it works. Norm was a master rifleman at the camp Perry matches.
 

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Good job on ordering a spare. I bumped the old thread so folks could see there's an issue and give them a chance to order a spare ($10) before it breaks and they're unable to shoot for a week. Back to dryfiring :)

...Norm Ricci gave me some good training tips. Among them was to practice dry firing at a small target. It was amazing how my scores crept up, it works. Norm was a master rifleman at the camp Perry matches.
I've had the same positive effect. Since I started dry firing, my ability to group has increased significantly. And the trigger is much smoother. Makes me doubt the trigger jobs I had done on my GP and SP revolvers. They were low round guns and I've found all my low round Rugers have crappy triggers. My new SBH Bisley's trigger is great after a few thousand dry fires, I doubt I'll change the springs or have a trigger job done on it.
 

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Don't believe I have heard of a transfer bar breaking that did not get 'pinched'...

If you are now dry firing with the same gun without 'curing' the pinch, you are simply going to break another bar sooner or later...
 

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...If you are now dry firing with the same gun without 'curing' the pinch, you are simply going to break another bar sooner or later...
Based on the reports here, it's the act of using the gun that causes the failure, not dry firing specifically. If your t-bar is pinched, it's going to break eventually, no matter if the gun is dry fired or not. Dry firing just brings the breakage event sooner. For the record, I do plan on thinning my new t-bar to eliminate pinch. And if your gun is used for hunting or protection, you should be very sure the t-bar isn't pinched....
 

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I filed down the hammer(s) on mine that needed it. However .... don't take off to much! I had to purchase a new hammer for my .357 50th as I was getting light primer strikes! Learned my lesson....


Since I started dry firing, my ability to group has increased significantly.
Glad it has worked for you :) .... But for me, I'll continue to go to the range a few times a week to exercise my trigger finger there, and continue to cycle my un-tuned SA revolvers (about one every couple months) to the gunsmith for a good action job. Some day, they all may be 'up to par'.... Because, for me, that has made a world of difference once I know what a good trigger should feel like. Before I shot them 'well', now I shoot 'em even better. Not a goin' a back! :) Next one that is getting the treatment is an SS Old Army .
 
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