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This thread is in regards to possibly build a 10/22. I have questions as to if its economical, whats parts are needed to completey build one. If its a better idea to buy a base one and switch parts on it. I am no gun expert so I am asking for peoples expierences. I have bought the parts neccesary for an AR 15 and my friend put it together but I have Heard you can do the same for a ruger 10/22. If its not worth it i would like to know. Thank you
 

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There are two paths to a custom 10/22; build from scratch (including an aftermarket receiver), or buy one off-the-shelf and substitute parts as you want, selling off the removed stock parts, and keeping the stock receiver. Selling the stock parts will offset some of the cost of the custom parts; of course, your total cost will depend upon the components you select.

It all depends on what you want to end up with; however, don't discount the potential in a stock rifle; a bit of work on a stock 10-22 can reap excellent results, at a significantly lower cost than an all-out custom build.

I can't offer first-hand specifics, though, as mine is stock with the exception of a Brimstone Tier 2 trigger job, which I think was money well spent. I've done a bit of work in bedding it and installing a home-made pillar for the takedown screw, which took minimal cost and few hours of my time.
 

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"The Real Deal"
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First 10/22 was given to me as a gift when I was 14. Later I decided I wanted a target 10/22, this was before ruger started offering a version similiar to what I built 3 or 5 years before. So what I did was bought another bone stock 10/22, then since my first ones wood stock was a little worn I moved it to my old rifle, wanting to keep it pretty much as I received it. I then purchased a new hogue overmold stock, butler creek .920 fluted barrel, threaded it 1/2×28, new trigger, new scope base, bipod, and other goodies. It was pretty close to buy one and change it as it was to buy the receiver sets and build one at that time. They are very simple to build, and are alot of fun. That also left me spare parts for my other 10/22 if they are needed later on. So i have an extra trigger, barrel band, barrel, stock, etc.

The ar15 is more complex than the 10/22 as far as parts in my opinion, and ruger is easier to build without specialized tools, versus the ar15. Its a fairly simple job to assemble one at home, and very rewarding. As far as price, I think they will be very close if you buy and change a complete rifle, versus building a custom from scratch depending on what parts you use.;)
 

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If you after a functioning 10/22 its cheaper to buy the whole rifle for $200 bucks. If your after a custom 10/22 then start off with an aftermarket receiver. A few of your parts will easly end up costing more than what a stock 10/22 sells for.
 

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First, don't say custom 10/22 and economical in the same sentence. I've spent enough on a custom bench rest 10/22 to cover the cost of just buying a more accurate bolt action rifle. Winchester 52 C or a Anschutz. !0/22's are more fun and you can burn thru ammo so much faster. MY vote is buy a base rifle from Ruger that most closely matches where you want to end up. Shoot it and have fun, while you figure out what you really want the rifle to do. There are too many after market companies to list for parts for one of these rifles, so having one and finding out the capabilities of it and yourself while you make the decisions on parts, cost, looks, scoped or not, heavy barrel, whose customs trigger, those decisions are much easier to make once your shooting. You may decide the rifle you have is perfect for what you want to do with it and save yourself a lot of time and money.
 

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Sethinator, My first 10/22 build for myself .... I bought a used 10/22 Carbine at a gun show for $150 . Little did I know the threads in the receiver for the "V" block and stock mount were stripped. After rethreading the receiver and making new screws, I went on a quest for perfection. I machined the bolt for headspace perfection and modified the trigger system for a 2 lb creep free trigger pull. I bought and installed a new 20" Green Mountain bull barrel. I also bought and installed a Fajen target stock. I then installed a 3.5~10X side dial 50mm scope. During the process, I test fired the gun several times and found the groups shrunk after each "upgrade". With all the work done, it now shoots tiny groups with match grade ammo and functions perfect.

My costs: Basic gun $150 (used), Scope $160 (on sale), scope base and rings $25, Stock$100 (on sale), Barrel $100, extra magazines $40, for a total of $575. If I would have paid someone to machine the bolt, rethread the receiver, or would have bought an aftermarket pre-machined bolt, you could easily add $150. Same for the trigger system ... had I not done it myself, it would have cost at least 50 bucks for a quality trigger. Had I started with a new 10/22, you could add at least $100. In other words, I could have easily spent $900 or more on this build. I did have a couple parts left over that I sold .... stock $25, barrel $25, which reduced my overall cost to $525.

I priced aftermarket parts ... receiver, bolt, and trigger group. This would save buying a new or used doner rifle but the total of just these parts were about double the cost of a brand new 10/22. I would expect to spend about $1k for a high quality 10/22 "from scratch" build.

Here's my 10/22 build:
 

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One thing I can say is know why you are building a custom rifle. If you have plans to compete, participate in competitions with a stock rifle. See what the shooters that are competitive are doing.
 
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