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Id like to try my hand at casting my own 9mm bullets. I will be using range lead. So I expect to to be a lead, copper, steel mix. Can I use the same pot for seperating the copper and making ingots, as I do for remelting the ingots when I am ready to make bullets?

I have heard several people say they use different pots. If thats so, why?
 

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You will get a lot of debris from smelting the range lead. You could clean out you smelting pot after pouring your ingots of clean lead and then cast. I would suggest the Lee electric melting pot for ladle casting. They don't cost that much from places like Mid South and you will be much happier. You will be able to control your temp much better with their pot giving you easier casting and nicer finished bullets. Get the Lyman cast bullet book and log onto the Cast Boolit Forum. You'll be hooked.
 

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For smelting I use an old cast iron pot on a coleman stove. Also remember that most of your range lead will be soft lead so you'll need to alloy it. That can cost quiet a bit if you have to buy the needed metal to create the proper alloy.
 

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I melt and clean recycled lead before casting with it. I use an old Coleman stove and an even older cast iron dutch oven. Melt it, remove all the jackets and non lead particles from the top and flux it like you would when casting. I then pour it into aluminium cupcake tins. I do use two furnaces when casting, one is for linotype and the other at the moment is set up for BPCR bullets.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
For smelting I use an old cast iron pot on a coleman stove. Also remember that most of your range lead will be soft lead so you'll need to alloy it. That can cost quiet a bit if you have to buy the needed metal to create the proper alloy.

I hadn't taken into account any other metal costs. I guess I assumed that range lead would be fine as it was. What is the best way for me to accomplish this?
 

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Id like to try my hand at casting my own 9mm bullets. I will be using range lead. So I expect to to be a lead, copper, steel mix. Can I use the same pot for seperating the copper and making ingots, as I do for remelting the ingots when I am ready to make bullets?

I have heard several people say they use different pots. If thats so, why?
Same pot is fine, if you are using lead from copper jacketed bullets you'll probably want to add some lynotype, to increase the hardness since the lead recovered from jacketed bullets is often too soft for casting pistol bullets.

Be careful with lead salvaged from a range especially if you suspect it's been wet at one time or another. It has a nasty habit of trapping moisture between the jackets and cores. Make sure it's dry.
 

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PLEASE go here log onto the Cast Boolit Forum.
Cast Boolits
It's not rocket science but there is a lot you need to know so you don't hurt yourself,
and your happy with the results. Do not melt in Aluminum pots.
Your selling yourself short if you don't join that forum, ( very short )
 

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Lead is a dense material ,as you flux it pushes impurities outward , including sideways & down !

Clean ya range alloy up in a seperate pot & flux well .

After you`re done pour the last remaining out slowly & see what`s in the bottom .

You`ll be surprised , I promise !!

I would`nt want to contend with that in a bottom pour pot !!!

The question ya ask `bout copper & steel "blending" with the lead is a myth !!

Temps are way to low to melt copper/steel.

Now copper & steel can be incorperated with lead "IF" it`s in a fine powdered state & even then the lead/tin melt would see it as an unbondable element & push it out at every chance it gets
 
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