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My first disassemble sp 101 was a bit nightmare. There was no problem until I had to reassembly the trigger guard assembly. I could not put it back in place no matter how I try. I spent almost two hours including checking the manual, youtube, web, etc with no success. Almost lost the front latch spring, too. It flied when I tried to move the trigger.

At last, I had to let a gunsmith help me. He did it right at first time !
It seemed that he did not do anything different from what I did.

Do you have any tips or advise about this. I need it before my second try.

By the way, this is my first gun. I never clean the gun since my ROTC field exercise several years ago. And that gun was HK 33 rifle :D
 

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I have 3 SP101s. 2 of the trigger guards snap right in. The third takes a real smack on the underside of the guard with my rawhide mallet to get the latch to snap closed
 

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I have several SPs and some times it requires a little more lining up than others. One of the main problems is the transfer bar will hang on either side just at the point where you apply pressure to the trigger guard. When the latch is still tight and even 2 hands won't close it, I use a small flat blade screw driver to depress the spring loaded latch while squeezing with the other hand and also watching the transfer bar. Just be careful it doesn't bite off a layer of skin between the frame and trigger group!
 

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I agree with the use of the leather or rubber mallet ,and can still feel pain from the skin I left between the frame and guard when tapping it in place the first time.
Best ,charlie
 

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With no disrespect intended, why is it necessary to disassemble the trigger guard assembly?

Is it a matter of cleaning debris or powder collection? Lubing? What?
 

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Discussion Starter #6
With no disrespect intended, why is it necessary to disassemble the trigger guard assembly?

Is it a matter of cleaning debris or powder collection? Lubing? What?
I bought it last week and want to check and clean before using.
 

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thjk, That is a good enough reason.

No doubt, each gun handler develops a technique for gun maintenance.

My approach to general gun maintenance differs when I handle a semiautomatic pistol or a revolver. Before my first shooting with a semi, I disassemble it completely, inspect all of the components and springs and thoroughly clean and lubricate the inner components of the pistol. I then oil the outside frame and slide surfaces and then wipe and buffer these surfaces leaving them as oil less as possible.

After each shooting session, I do a field strip, inspect, clean and lube all disassembled parts. I finish by oiling, wiping, and buffering the outside frame and slide.

I only do a detailed disassembly if my visual inspection discovers a problem or whenever I complete putting through 1,000 rounds.

My procedure for a revolver is different. Before my first shooting with a revolver I simply do a visual inspection of the revolver intact and then follow the SP101 manual bypassing a complete disassembly as I do for semiautomatic pistols. This is what the manual states:

“The internal mechanism of the SP101 revolver can be lubricated without
disassembly. A few drops of light oil recommended as suitable for firearms,
applied periodically about the various frame openings, will work its way into the mechanism parts. The exterior of the revolver and the bore and chambers should be thoroughly cleaned and then wiped with an oily cloth if the gun is to be stored. Do not apply excess lubrication.

To clean the revolver after firing, swing the cylinder out and clean the barrel from the muzzle by running a cleaning rod with a solvent coated patch through the bore several times. A bronze wire brush (of correct size for gun caliber) attached to the cleaning rod should then be pushed the full length of the bore several times. Again swab the bore with a solvent coated patch. Then wipe the rod clean and, using a dry patch, swab the bore until it is clean. Examine the bore to be sure that no fouling remains. Repeat the above procedure for each of the five chambers.

Chambers must be thoroughly scrubbed to remove build-up of bullet metal and firing residue. A dirty chamber can prevent full seating of a cartridge, which in turn causes the cylinder to bind. DO NOT APPLY EXCESSIVE OIL TO UNDERSIDE OF EJECTOR – AREA SHOULD BE WIPED DRY WITH OILY
CLOTH. Also, the underside of the ejector (‘star’) and the area of the cylinder where the ejector seats, must be clean. Dirt can prevent the ejector from fully seating. That condition can cause hard closing of the cylinder and interfere with proper cylinder rotation.

If lead bullet loads are fired extensively, lead build-up may cause cylinder
binding. Lubricate the cylinder crane gap with Break-Free® CLP or some other lubrication which meets mil. spec. Mil-163460 to prevent this condition.”

thjk, it is my personal opinion that a complete disassembly of a revolver is necessary only if a problem is observed. However, I do recognize that many gun handlers not only feel more secure doing complete disassembly but find the process relaxing and enjoyable.

I wish you years of enjoyment and protection with your fine revolver.
 

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I would " ASSUME" you troubles came from the transfer bar not going up into the frame properly and just needed a bit of coaxing to get it forward & then it went right up into place, since it was a new revolver, everything will fit really tight..No problem..
Give us a Range Report after you Break er in some & smooth the action out..
 

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I would " ASSUME" you troubles came from the transfer bar not going up into the frame properly and just needed a bit of coaxing to get it forward & then it went right up into place.
When my SP101 came home, I pulled it apart to, well, I take everything apart.

I was surprised when the trigger assembly didn't go back into the frame like every other Ruger I own. Lots of those.

The latch would not pass through the frame because there was a burr in the latch hole. After polishing the burr away, and polishing the machine grooves off the latch, it re-assembles perfectly with a touch of rubber mallet love.
 

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I agree with the rubber mallet method.

My latest Security Six required a couple taps on the back of the trigger guard during reassembly.
 

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I agree with the rubber mallet method.
Just to be clear, this shouldn't require much force. A dab should do it.

It should also be directed at moving the assembly squarely into place. Avoid off angle mallet force, the assembly needs to go straight in.

Mine will actually seat without the mallet, but it falls a hair short of seating completely into place. The mallet leaves less of a hairline between the surfaces. Very small difference, no difference in function. It just looks and feels better where the come together.
 

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Just to be clear, this shouldn't require much force. A dab should do it.

It should also be directed at moving the assembly squarely into place. Avoid off angle mallet force, the assembly needs to go straight in.

Mine will actually seat without the mallet, but it falls a hair short of seating completely into place. The mallet leaves less of a hairline between the surfaces. Very small difference, no difference in function. It just looks and feels better where the come together.
Just to add, keep your fingers clear of where the trigger gaurd assembly and the frame meet.:eek: you don't want your skin stuck in there when it does seat!
 
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