Ruger Forum banner

1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
86 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello everyone,

I have a New Model Single-Six that I think I'm having issues with, but it might be my astigmatism. Any insight would help.

I bought this NM SS [6.5" blued, 1974 production] for a decent price as it only came with the .22mag Ruger cylinder.

I bought an 8-shot Story SS .22lr cylinder for it, and like the quality so much I got the 8-shot Story SS .22Mag cylinder to go with it, for having the same capacity.

They fit/function just fine!

As I began using the gun and sighting it in for .22lr ammo [which is my preferred round for this handgun], I began noticing an issue.

The rounds were striking so far to the right that I had to move the rear sight to the right to compensate and bring POI back to where it should be.

Upon close inspection, it looked like the front sight was canted to the right about 1/2-1 degree.

I sent it in to Ruger, but with the .22Mag cylinder, as I had heard stories that they may not send back the gun with the attached parts, or I might be billed for a Ruger cylinder before they would send it back.

Ruger's paperwork said they adjusted the rear sight [to center again], and the test target [15 yards, 6 rounds] showed it as decently on target. It kind of looks like they gave the barrel a quick muzzle crown recut, but that isn't indicated on the paperwork.

I won't have time to get to the range with it for a few more weeks, but this is starting to bug me.

I admit I have an astigmatism that causes vertical lines to tip at an angle if my head tips at any angle. It isn't a horrible thing, but enough to account for a degree or two of alignment issues.

What is bugging me is whether I misread the whole situation, or if the cylinders might contribute.


When I was shooting, the rear sight had to be drifted so far to the right that the screw was in danger of falling out, and the sightblade was about to fall out.

Only with the rear sight at this location could I get the .22lr rounds to hit to POA.


MY QUESTION:

Can chamber/bore alignment result in a consistent 1-1 1/2" POI to the left of POA, with all 8 chambers in the cylinder?

Thanks in advance.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,618 Posts
Your answer is yes. Whether or not that's your problem is harder to determine. Shoot factory ammo in the factory cylinder from a rest. See if that works.

Jeff
 

·
Retired Moderator & Gunsmith
Joined
·
17,058 Posts
bczrx, I would say NO ... here's why. Typically when cylinder-to-bore alignment is off, the group spreads in all directions ... not just to the left or right, up or down. Poor C-T-B alignment causes the bullet to get damaged, which in turn makes it go into an ever increasing spiral that spreads the group in all directions.

Here's something to consider: your 6 1/2" barrel has a sight radius of 8 inches. Doing the math .... 25 yards = 900 inches; 8/900=.0088. So ... for about every .009" of sight movement (either the front or rear) it will move POI 1" at 25 yards. A canted front sight can move the top of the blade quite a bit, which could account for 10" or more POI change. Just the thickness of a fingernail (about .030") will move POI by more than 3". I doubt if most people could even detect a .030" canted front sight so if it is bad enough to detect with the naked eye, chances are it is off a tenth of an inch or more.

My conclusion is .... it's the canted front sight that is the cause of your POI versus POA discrepancy. It could be compounded by your vision issues or ability to hold the gun steady. All single action revolvers have a very long lock time ... which means the time it takes for the hammer to fall once you pull the trigger. In what seems instant ... it really takes about .075 seconds for the hammer to drop then another .025 seconds for the hammer to strike the transfer bar, the transfer bar strikes the firing pin, and the firing pin strikes the priming compound in the rim, causing the powder to ignite and send the bullet down the bore. In this approximately 1 tenth of a second total lock time, your hand can move a considerable amount ... remember the math from above .... .009" of sight movement will change POI by 1" at 25 yards.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
3,167 Posts
Your answer is yes.
Not correct - except in the world where "everything is possible" and mechanical troubleshooting is random, which it isn't.

bczrx, I would say NO ... here's why. Typically when cylinder-to-bore alignment is off, the group spreads in all directions ... not just to the left or right, up or down...

My conclusion is .... it's the canted front sight that is the cause of your POI versus POA discrepancy. It could be compounded by your vision issues or ability to hold the gun steady.
Most likely, this is correct. Iowegan's assessment is most likely spot on. Bullet damage from mis-aligned C-t-B tends to cause dispersion, not displacement.

It's also very quick and cheap to buy range rods, or pay a smith to dip your revolver and confirm alignment to disprove or confirm your mis-alignment hypothesis.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,755 Posts
I think any gross cylinder barrel alignment issue would be flagged by Ruger techs. At one time I had a single six that was sort of messy in the cylinder barrel area having what I thought was excessive chamber/cylinder alignment problems as some bullet/lead particles were in that area. I was able to hit a large coffee can at 100 yards from sand bags so I quit worrying about it.

I see Ruger provided a test target and it looked acceptable.

I also see Ruger may have touched up the crown.

My suggestion would be to shoot from sandbags at the same distance that Ruger shot the test target. Be sure to keep the front of the cylinder away from the sand bag. Try 20 cycles or so of dry firing to see if the sights remain lined up after that old style hammer completes its fall to land on the firing pin.

Shooting handguns with their stubby short barrels is sort of an exercise in technique like pitching curve balls.

I think this is a technique issue rather than a problem with your revolver.
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top