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Discussion Starter #1
I've seen chronographs mentioned in several threads so, what brand of chronograph are you using?

I've got a Oehler 35P. I bought it to replace the Oehler 33 I had for a lot of years that a buddy of mine's kid stole.
 

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chrony here also, it works and works and it dosnt seem to be to pickey on light conditions as long as you dont shade it to much.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Does anyone else have an chronograph?
 

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I've owned several. I had a Pact that worked well until a friend (?) drilled it with a 44 mag. I still have an old Chrony that works perfect and a dual sky screen Oehler. Oehler is the top of the line, Chrony is the bottom. They both read the same when I test them together.

The Chrony is very easy and fast to set up. It can be a little fussy about light conditions and has been known to spook when birds or clouds move overhead. I use this chronograph the most because it is a fraction the cost of my Oehler (they no longer make chronographs) should a bullet stray. I often will use both at the same time. I set the Oehler up at 12 feet and the Chrony at 100 yards. I can plug the results into Ballistic Explorer to compute actual ballistic coefficient.

There are several brands available and all are quite good. If you want the extra bells and whistles like a remote readout, built in memory, printer, or calculator, it will cost you more. A remote read out is well worth the money however, I seldom use the math functions or printer.

Basically what you want to know is: Does your velocity match what the book says? When you shoot a 10 shot string, what is the max velocity spread from highest to lowest? When your max spread is tight, you know your reloading techniques are working. You can compute standard deviation but that really is a fairly worthless stastic that is a prediction of what the next round fired should be. The ballistic coefficient test is great for charting long range rifle loads.

I firmly believe a chronograph is one of the most valuable tools you can have, especially if you reload. When I work up a load for a new cartridge, I always buy a box of factory ammo with the same bullet weight. My goal is to match the factory velocity and keep max spreads less than factory ammo. One thing you will learn; most factory ammo is over rated in their literature.
 

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quote:Originally posted by Iowegan

I use this chronograph the most because it is a fraction the cost of my Oehler (they no longer make chronographs) should a bullet stray.
I didn't know Oehler no longer made chronographs. Since when? And why did they discontinue?
 

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Yes, Oehler quit making chronographs earlier this year. They still make a lab quality unit and are now into piezo pressure measuring equipment (for measuring chamber pressure).

No doubt, the $100 chronographs drove them out of business. Oehler makes fine equipment but you do pay dearly for it. For the bulk of us reloaders, a $100 unit will work just fine.
 

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quote:Originally posted by Iowegan


No doubt, the $100 chronographs drove them out of business. Oehler makes fine equipment but you do pay dearly for it. For the bulk of us reloaders, a $100 unit will work just fine.
Thanks for the info. Yes, I do see the point. $100 unit would be all I'd need.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
quote:Originally posted by Iowegan

Yes, Oehler quit making chronographs earlier this year. They still make a lab quality unit and are now into piezo pressure measuring equipment (for measuring chamber pressure).

No doubt, the $100 chronographs drove them out of business. Oehler makes fine equipment but you do pay dearly for it. For the bulk of us reloaders, a $100 unit will work just fine.
Oehler is still in business, why would you think they're out of business? Oehler stopped production due to problems getting printers for the 35P. They're trying to find/make a printer that will work with the 35P. If you find a new or good used chronograph they still have everything to do warranty work on it or sell you spare parts if you need them.

I really like my 35P, in a way I'm kind of glad my buddy's kid stole my 33 so I'd have to move up.
 

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I never said Oehler is out of business as a company, just out of the chronograph business. Last time I talked to them, I ordered a new set of sky screens. When I asked about the current model 35P, they told me they were no longer going to make chronographs. They will be putting their efforts into the new Model 43 Personal Ballistic Laboratory.

If you check their web site, here's their blurb:
"Oehler has reluctantly suspended production of handloader equipment, including the Model 35. Our current inventory of handloader systems is depleted. Production of industrial equipment and technical support for all Oehler equipment continues. You can still get warranty service and parts."

See: http://www.oehler-research.com/index.html
 

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Baldy, Where do you shoot? Most ranges allow you to use chronographs. If you shoot at an indoor range, an artificial light system is needed. Ideally, a chronograph should be placed 12 feet from the muzzle. This keeps the muzzle blast from spoofing the chronograph yet is not far enough away to loose much velocity.
 
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