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Discussion Starter #1
I just finished cleaning two new mini 14s that I purchased for my son and myself. The preservative they put on the rifles is like extra thick oil, and there is so much of it I am not surprised by stories online from people who took their new gun to the range and had all sorts of issues. I am surprised that they do not fly apart. If you work the action before you clean it and after a thorough cleaning and light lubrication, you can tell right away especially side by side with the uncleaned one. This is why I keep brake cleaner on hand it makes quick work of oil and grease on metal parts. Finish with a light coat of Hoppes 9
on a rag and it just feels right. The last time I had a gun with so much stuff on it was a Garand caked with cosmoline. However I am now expecting the guns to work flawlessly.:)
 

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Corps Commander NGV
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It is so refreshing to read about someone cleaning their new gun. Most folks seem to just take it out of the box, load it with the cheapest steel-cased import ammo they can find, then post about how their new Ruger doesn't work. Have fun at the range!
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Yeah I read those posts too but I have more realistic expectations anyway. I have an older mini from the 90s and it has never failed to fire or eject. It also came clean in the box new all I did was run a few patches down the bore.
 

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Righteous Dude
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That's what I would do! Cut the grease and clean as normal.

I got my first Mini in NY. I got the rest here. The TN Minis have those evil threaded barrels... ;)
 

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Exalted One
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Have a new 583 Ranch, NIB, likely loaded with that gunk. Also have lots of carb cleaner to rid it of that and a torque driver ready to set the front gas block gap straight and even.

Won't shoot it until it gets a thorough cleaning and a check on the gas-block gap (both of which were bad in my 583 Tactical).

For anyone getting a new Mini-14: thoroughly clean them before first shooting. Otherwise, some of the crap Ruger coats mith (for justifiable reasons) getting all heated up with firing will just make things worse and tougher to clear out.
 

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I try to never shoot anything before cleaning it. I get to the range so infrequently, that I often clean guns more than once in between range trips.

I find it calming and I like keeping my hands busy while watching tv and such
 

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When it comes to cleaning, do not expect a concise answer. Some people clean after every use. Some don't clean until accuracy falls off. Some clean until the bore is factory-new. Others do less. My actual cleaning time is 10min or less. I am currently looking for a cleaning mat to get. Some gun owners say a mat is a must to have. Read this Best Gun Cleaning Mat (Updated: July 2020) to find your own method to clean your guns
 

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olouttt7, here is a thread I did last year about a Ruger Mini specific cleaning mat I bought:

Hoppe's #9 is a decent solvent to cut powder fouling, but really isn't a lube.
You want a light coat of oil and grease on a Mini, just in the correct locations.

CLP is a good all around thing to use if you don't want to keep several different bottles around, "cleans, lubes, protects".
I have a small tub of Brownell's grease to use on the receiver rails. The Mini is like a Garand as far as lube.
Remember the old adage, "Use grease for things that slide, oil for things that pivot".

Put a small dab of grease on the (non rolling) bolt roller, and on the areas where the bolt rides in the receiver, and where the op-rod moves in the receiver grooves. After your new Mini has had some rounds through it, you'll start to see rub marks in the finish, that's where you want a small amount of grease, on those friction points.
After greasing, work the action a few times and the grease will spread out where it needs to be.

If you notice a drop off in accuracy, it could be due to copper fouling. Some barrels will build up copper fouling more than others. The fit of the bullet to bore, how smooth the rifling is and other factors can make one Mini hardly ever foul, whereas another Mini will get copper fouling much easier.
You should check for copper fouling periodically by running a patch through with a copper cleaner on it.
I use Sweet's 7.62 solvent but there are a few others. All good copper solvents contain Ammonia.
Don't leave the barrel soaked overnight, it could "etch" the rifling. Let the copper solvent work for 20 minutes or so, then clean it out. If the patch comes out looking Blue/Green, you still have copper fouling in there.

Don't worry about getting 100% of it out, it's too much effort, and barrels tend to shoot best with a little bit of fouling in them. Just get the worst of it out.
I notice more copper fouling in the higher velocity varmint calibers, .223/5.56mm on up.
I haven't seen copper fouling to be an issue in the lower velocity 7.62 x 39 that the Mini-30 fires.

Wipe down the outside of the Mini with a very light coat of CLP or other lube that's proven to be a good corrosion protector, especially if it's going to be put away for several months. And a light coat inside the bore as well.
Magazines can rust too, keep a light coat of oil on the outside of the bodies. I put Cerakote on all of my mags, you'll never have to worry about rust appearing again when they are Cerakoted, plus they aren't as shiny after the treatment:

You don't want to put oil inside the mag bodies, or on the firing pin or it's channel, as it will pick up dust, lint and other crud. You can use a dry lube in those spots though. It will protect those areas without attracting undesirable junk.
 
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