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Discussion Starter #1
I was cleaning some of my reloading dies when I noticed some build up on set of my 30.06 dies so I took 1 of my cleaning rags and started wiping them off then sprayed some rem oil and used a little piece of 0000 steel wool . Came off pretty good but what I'm wondering Would it hurt them to put'em in my lyman turbo tumbler for awhile with the treated corn-cob media ? So I thought This Definitely would be a good question for you forum members .


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I’ve never given that idea much thought but I don’t see how doing so would be problematic.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Yeah that's what I was thinking so to . If I clean them 1 piece at a time and don't let the other pieces bang into 1 another . You wouldn't think that it would hurt anything .


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I just run a wet patch, followed by dry patches, through mine. That said, whenever my dies start affecting my ammo, they get cleaned.
 

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If I clean them 1 piece at a time and don't let the other pieces bang into 1 another . You wouldn't think that it would hurt anything .


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Woodsey, how much bangin' do you think is going on in there? Now I would remove the de-capping mandrel and seater plug and blow the dies out afterward, but they won't be bangin' around like rocks in a clothes dryer. JMO
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Yeah your right . Wasn't worried so much about really banging around as much as rubbing together and maybe causing some damage but Yeah now thinking about it the metal that it is made out of is some of the toughest stuff I've ever seen


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I just ran a body die for awhile in my Thumbler, it works.........but you’ll need to give em’ a good wipe down afterwards. I think it’s more trouble than it’s worth. JMO
 

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Should not be an issue. I will put mine in the sonic cleaner occasionally with the other parts. Have not tried the we tumbler yet but have been tempted.
 
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In a case tumbler , with dry media , the dies are heavy so don't put two or three dies into one tumbler ...they might beat each other up and it might take a toll on belts .
A vibrating case polisher may work but again the dies are heavy .
Either one isn't made to clean heavy dies .
I wouldn't do it but you will be the one paying for the replacement parts not me.
Parts cleaners...Go for it these are designed to clean heavy parts , I've put 1911 frame, slide and barrel into them for cleaning ...works well .
Easy clean ...just soak dies in any solvent , Ed's Red , kerosene , Mineral Spirits , auto parts cleaner . After a few hours , remove from soak and wipe clean .
No sense damaging an expensive case polisher .
Gary
 

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I'm spoiled! Most of my reloading was handgun ammo on a Dillon RL550 using Dillon dies. Dillon dies come apart by just removing a keeper .... plus the body stays in the tool head so readjustments aren't necessary. I've been known to put the whole dismantled tool head in my ultrasonic cleaner with kerosene type solvent. They come out super clean so all you need to do is wipe off the solvent. I use the same procedure with rifle dies that I take apart before cleaning.

I would NOT recommend using any type of metal brush or abrasive pads because it could cause scratches that will show up on your brass cases.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Thanks Gentlemen for your input . Just pulled a die out of the tumbler that has been running for about 3 hour's and it was spot on and NO damage what so ever and after polishing it up with 0000 steel wool and some flitz Wow it's blinging now .
 

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Mark204 your post #8 still has me laughing. " rocks in a dryer". I have to hold my tablet on my stomach and it keeps moving from me laughing.
 

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Tried it only draw back is sometimes you get media dust/rouge accumulation or cob/ walnut chunks. Break cleaners are obviously oil residue free and dry in moments. As a powerful solvent gets all types of lube build up, out.
 

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Wear rubber gloves keep your vent hole clean and never look down the die hole while spraying. No pun or innuendo intended. Alrigh, pun and innuendo intended
 

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I will spray brake cleaner if there's a build up of wax or lube, wipe them out with a nylon brush & patch, then lube them with WD-40 or synthetic oil (whatever is handy and maybe depending on how often they get used... longer term storage I would definitely use a heavier oil). I have recently adopted a policy of cleaning my size dies after every use, something I didn't use to do, and then wiping them out with brush & patch before use as well. It might be my imagination, but it seems that leaving them sit for a long period without use invites scratches on the brass, especially at the base. Then again, it wouldn't be the first time my memory failed me in that regard!
Cheers,
crkckr
 
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