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Discussion Starter #1
thinking about an accurizing kit for my MK II 10 in. don't really know why, its way more accurate as is than ill ever be, but still...
Pros? Cons? other recommendations?
my biggest issue is I may have to send it off for installation as there are no gunsmiths that I trust around me.
 

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Recommendations? If the pistol is already more accurate than you are, and you don't feel like you might get much better as a shooter, then the mods would be a waste of money. My Mark 1 was better than me, out of the box, back in 1972. I am now 73 and do not expect to get any better, only worse. The gun allowed me to achieve Distinguished Expert 'way back then. I deeply feel that your Mark 2 is probably as good as you could expect, already. Some day I'll rant about the people who spend so much on accurizing guns simply because they don't know how to shoot.
 

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thinking about an accurizing kit for my MK II 10 in. don't really know why, its way more accurate as is than ill ever be, but still...
Pros? Cons? other recommendations?
my biggest issue is I may have to send it off for installation as there are no gunsmiths that I trust around me.
Yes, the Ruger Mk .22 out of the box is very accurate. If you're happy with the way You shoot it, nuff said! If not and if I understood BV's point correctly, spending $$$ on tools to shoot better (if You are not serious about shooting better), might be working backwards. Developing proper shooting techniques and skills first through practice, practice and more practice would be more desirable! Now, my real issue is...if only I could Practice what I Preach!?! :rolleyes: :eek:

However, I must say for me, accurizing the tool has been almost as much enjoyment as shooting it and yes, it has helped Me to achieve Better and Faster precision success! :D

Ted
 

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I’ve had Mark 3’s and 4’s. All were very accurate as is, but the Volquartsen kit really makes for a nice, light trigger. The installation isn’t too bad provided you have three hands. It depends on what you want out of the pistol. If it’s primarily for target work I say go for it, but if it’ll be carried in the field for hunting/pest control then I might stick with the factory trigger.
 

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No experience with the handgun, but I did install a Volquartzen sear kit in my 77/22 boat paddle rifle.

It made a literal world of improvement.
Mine is 1999 vintage, and came with the F150TC trigger.
This is the "lawyer trigger" that requires an F150 + Tow chain to pull it... ;)
 

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Philc1, I bought a used KMK-10 about a year ago. The previous owner ran it through Volquartsen for several modifications to include an extended magazine release, a VQ trigger, sear, and hammer, plus it was drilled and tapped for a scope and has a VQ scope base installed. It also had a Volquartsen space wars target grip. I liked most of the mods but hated the heavy VQ trigger and grip.... went back to a standard black factory trigger and a Hogue grip.

The gun had a nice red dot mounted but it didn't get along with my aging vision so I replaced it with a variable power scope. It will now compete favorably with most 22 rifles …. at least out to 50 yards.

Here's the finished product:
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Philc1, I bought a used KMK-10 about a year ago. The previous owner ran it through Volquartsen for several modifications to include an extended magazine release, a VQ trigger, sear, and hammer, plus it was drilled and tapped for a scope and has a VQ scope base installed. It also had a Volquartsen space wars target grip. I liked most of the mods but hated the heavy VQ trigger and grip.... went back to a standard black factory trigger and a Hogue grip.

The gun had a nice red dot mounted but it didn't get along with my aging vision so I replaced it with a variable power scope. It will now compete favorably with most 22 rifles …. at least out to 50 yards.

Here's the finished product:
Heavy trigger?
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I do use this pistol for some hunting. It’s a heck of a squirrel getter. But mostly it’s target off the beach. It will punch really nice tight little groups if I really concentrate on my trigger work. The stock trigger is just a bit heavy and rough. Just looking to make it better!
 

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I do use this pistol for some hunting. It’s a heck of a squirrel getter. But mostly it’s target off the beach. It will punch really nice tight little groups if I really concentrate on my trigger work. The stock trigger is just a bit heavy and rough. Just looking to make it better!
Then Phil, dropping in THIS will cut your pull weight in half and smooth out the trigger travel! :)

Ted
 

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I have been shooting my MKIV now for a couple months. I love it. But, a fellow at the range let me shoot his with the V Kit. I thought the trigger was great and think I could improve my target shooting. Thinking about it.
 

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My name is OpSysWiz and I'm a Trigger Snob.

A fancy trigger isn't worth it, and won't help you become a better shooter until you've become a very proficient target or competition shooter and have grip and trigger control/press down pat. If you do, and it sounds like you are very proficient, I highly recommend the Volguartsen Accurizing Kit. Its installed in my Ruger MK IV 22/45 comp gun and I love it.

I helped a comp buddy install his and it does, INDEED, take 3 hands to install it. Being that I do not have 3 hands, I sent mine to Volquartsen to install - they turned it around in about 10 days as I recall. They had set the pre-travel a bit long for me but that was easily adjusted to my preference. Note that pre-travel impacts trigger reset - so go a little at a time to ensure reliability (which is why they probably set it a bit long to start you out).
 

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The VQ "Accurizing Kit" won't make the pistol any more accurate, it will make the shooter more accurate. A good trigger makes accurate shooting a lot easier.

As to Iowegian's comment about the Volquartsen "heavy trigger", I expect he was referring to the trigger blade itself, not the pull weight.
 

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GP Fan, You are right. The VQ trigger is stainless steel, thick, and heavy. I much prefer the factory aluminum trigger. Trigger pull weight is exactly the same with both triggers.

I totally agree with your comment about trigger pull or VQ's accurizing kit. It doesn't make the gun more accurate but it might make the shooter more accurate.

I think most everyone would agree …. a lighter and smoother (creep free) trigger pull is more desirable however it usually doesn't result in higher scores at the range. Back when I had my shop, I encouraged my customers to do a "before and after" on guns they had me work on. Many actually did this and liked the trigger much better than the way it was shipped from the factory …… however, most people did not improve their scores much, if any. When people really practice a lot, I think a good trigger job may improve scores but for the average shooter, they tend to keep their bad shooting habits no matter how good the trigger feels.
 

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I put the VQ kit in my MKIII. Pain in the rear to install, but there are numerous videos on YouTube to walk you through it. If you're a klutz like me, keep your surrounding workspace as clear as possible. That way, if you drop something, it will be much easier to find.

All that being said, I love the trigger on the VQ kit. It's super light and crisp. There was nothing wrong, per se, with the stock trigger, but I feel that got my money's worth with the VQ kit.
 

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Trigger pull weight is exactly the same with both triggers.

//Maybe I misunderstood the above, however, the factory trigger pull weight on my MK IV 22/45 varied between 5 and 6 pounds, was gritty and pre-travel was too long for me. The pull weight for my Volquartsen kit is a consistent 2 1/4 pounds.//

I totally agree with your comment about trigger pull or VQ's accurizing kit. It doesn't make the gun more accurate but it might make the shooter more accurate.

//Yup, given good training and much practice.//


I think a good trigger job may improve scores but for the average shooter, they tend to keep their bad shooting habits no matter how good the trigger feels.

//Agreed. Adding or replacing parts with fancy high priced stuff will NOT make a better shooter. Thousands of rounds and hundreds of hours of good training DOES. Practice does not make perfect, perfect practice makes perfect.

Bottom line: I've seen many shooters with $1000 to $4000 guns but have spent ZERO on training (not practice - training)//
Pistol Grip Lesson- Shannon Smith- Grand Master and World Champion Shooter
 

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Philc1 said:
thinking about an accurizing kit for my MK II 10 in. don't really know why,...
This is typical, and surprisingly honest. It seems to me that 99% of the aftermarket parts get sold because people read what others have done and what "miracles" they claim resulted from doing so. They buy the parts more to "fit in" and have something to post about in forums or other social media, rather than to meet a specific goal. The "kits" are generally overkill for what most people need to make them happy with their guns.

The stock trigger is just a bit heavy and rough. Just looking to make it better!
Now this is a goal!

You don't need to spend the $$ getting an accurizing kit to reach this goal. All you need is a smoother sear/hammer interface. The sear Ted provided a link to is the only part of the "kit" you would need. The other part of the equation is smoothing & polishing up the hammer notch.

OpSysWiz said:
Pistol Grip Lesson- Shannon Smith- Grand Master and World Champion Shooter
The others that have posted about accuracy are correct about practice. But putting all 10 rounds in the X ring at 25 yards has never been one of my goals. If it were, I'd invest in a setup exactly like Iowegan's wonderful 10" pistol. For my 4.75" fixed sight pistols - I'm thrilled to keep 3/4" groups at 15 yards.

I'll never be as accurate as Shannon Smith, nor as fast as Jerry Miculek. I'm perfectly okay with that.

My goal in modifying my pistols has been about improving reliability. The stock design of the mark pistols is good, but like many other brands - they fail to fire "bad ammo". Easy enough to only buy "good ammo" or accept the occasional failure, but I was obsessed with ending all failures with all ammo. My ideas were initially only that - ideas. I spent a ton of time any money redesigning my MKIII to remove all friction and to find the optimum firing pin design. I no longer believe any thing I read from those who claim "bad ammo" causes failures to fire. My mostly stock MKII will have 1-3% failures with junk ammo (about like anyone else with a "good gun"), but the MKIII never hiccups on anything I feed it. It's boringly reliable.

As far as getting "training", there is value to that. But it's not going to make you a great shooter either. It's about the same as buying the aftermarket parts IMO. I've tried using the "pistol grip" Shannon says is "correct", and it doesn't work for me. I experimented with a variety of holds before coming up with the one that works best for me. But chances are that Shannon's grip will work better for most shooters than what my hold is. So yes, get training; but adapt the training to what meets your needs/goals.

JMO.
 

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Shoot more
Train with specific goals
As the goals are reached move them out and add to them
8-10,00 rounds down the road you'll see how much can be accomplished and how little changing the equipment is needed.
But
at that point you'll most likely be able to make your own decisions on what should be changed
 

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I'll just relate my own experience. I have a 1994 MKII stock Standard. I took it in to a shop and directly compared the trigger with a "Volquartzenized" gun. I would not give $0.05 for the "upgrade." The only difference was about 1/8" of take up on my trigger. Other than that I could tell no difference. YMMV. All I do is plink.
 

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thinking about an accurizing kit for my MK II 10 in. don't really know why, its way more accurate as is than ill ever be, but still...
Pros? Cons? other recommendations?
my biggest issue is I may have to send it off for installation as there are no gunsmiths that I trust around me.
I put a Volquartzen trigger into my new Mark IV Competition because the factory one was just terrible. Yeah, the gun was already more accurate than me, but I couldn't take advantage of that with the crappy trigger. I have modest mechanical skills, and less than average patience, but was able to install the Volquartzen trigger in under an hour. Very happy with the result, and got some satisfaction from doing it myself. Alternatively, I believe you can send it to Volquartzen for the installation.
 
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