Ruger Forum banner
1 - 20 of 21 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey I'm new to reloading. I'm Trying to load 9mm 115 Grain rounds for practice before i invest more money. The powder I have is HS6, according to what X-Treme says "Our Copper Plated Bullets can be run at mid-range jacketed velocities or higher end lead velocities. We recommend keeping velocities to less than 1500 FPS (Feet Per Second) and using only a light taper crimp" My Modern Reloading Second Edition has HS6 Lead 115 Grain starting at 6.4 and never exceed 6.9 with velocities at 1117 and 1170 respectively. Although my buddies Hornady Book has the max load for FMJ RN at 6.4 with HS6. So what would be a safe load? I'm just trying to be extra cautious, If 6.4 is the max for Jacketed how is Lead able to go to 6.9? When you go to Hodgdons website it only has data for GDHP and LRN. The LRN matches what my book has to say. How much do I load to start with a decent round? I don't want to go hot they will just be range ammo
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
636 Posts
Jacketed is harder and does not conform to the bore like lead.
Plated is softer than jacketed but harder than plain or coated lead.
The ones they say keep under 1,500 FPS are the hollow based ones which have thicker plating and meant to be driven somewhat faster.
Start at the minimum load and load 10 and then go up .1 or .2 grains of powder and load 10 more and do this till you reach close to max (not max yet).
Always check you charge weight, a little over is usually not bad but some powders have a very short range between min and max.
Once you find the sweet spot, functions well and is accurate work with length of loaded round to find the best length to use.
Never go under min length but a little longer may be better if it fits the magazine and chambers properly.
The reloading books have pretty good info but are set up to try to keep folks out of trouble with reloading.
Once you become proficient in reloading then you may want to play around with max loads but I have found most of the best loads for accuracy are below max.
Another thing to think about is the components the reloading book uses, if you are not using the same start a little lower in powder charge and work up, sometimes it doesn't matter much but the closer to max you get the more it does matter.
Just my nickels worth.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
295 Posts
Welcome to wonky world of which guide do you follow.
In a nutshell, a jacketed bullet can take more pressure and powder to fully obturate (seal the bore). Lead unless somebody really goofed up, and created hard cast, requires a little less.
Coated lead bullets are reported to be able to run a little faster, while plated bullets are "usually" loaded to the same standard as lead, and run a little slower than coated.

I prefer to stick with what the powder manufacturer recommends, if you can't find that then the bullet folks.
There's so much on line today, you'll be here next year trying to decide.

What you're after is a mid range target load. Start at the start load and document the load recipe, then increase a couple grains, until you're just past half way. Shoot those batches, if you find what you like, run it. If not, inspect all primers and cases, and gently ease up. Never go above max, ever. And of course, if your loading for target, why go to max in the first place.

Here's a digital playland for you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Jacketed is harder and does not conform to the bore like lead.
Plated is softer than jacketed but harder than plain or coated lead.
The ones they say keep under 1,500 FPS are the hollow based ones which have thicker plating and meant to be driven somewhat faster.
Start at the minimum load and load 10 and then go up .1 or .2 grains of powder and load 10 more and do this till you reach close to max (not max yet).
Always check you charge weight, a little over is usually not bad but some powders have a very short range between min and max.
Once you find the sweet spot, functions well and is accurate work with length of loaded round to find the best length to use.
Never go under min length but a little longer may be better if it fits the magazine and chambers properly.
The reloading books have pretty good info but are set up to try to keep folks out of trouble with reloading.
Once you become proficient in reloading then you may want to play around with max loads but I have found most of the best loads for accuracy are below max.
Another thing to think about is the components the reloading book uses, if you are not using the same start a little lower in powder charge and work up, sometimes it doesn't matter much but the closer to max you get the more it does matter.
Just my nickels worth.
Thank you! So I should start at that 6.4 and feel my way around basically?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Welcome to wonky world of which guide do you follow.
In a nutshell, a jacketed bullet can take more pressure and powder to fully obturate (seal the bore). Lead unless somebody really goofed up, and created hard cast, requires a little less.
Coated lead bullets are reported to be able to run a little faster, while plated bullets are "usually" loaded to the same standard as lead, and run a little slower than coated.

I prefer to stick with what the powder manufacturer recommends, if you can't find that then the bullet folks.
There's so much on line today, you'll be here next year trying to decide.

What you're after is a mid range target load. Start at the start load and document the load recipe, then increase a couple grains, until you're just past half way. Shoot those batches, if you find what you like, run it. If not, inspect all primers and cases, and gently ease up. Never go above max, ever. And of course, if your loading for target, why go to max in the first place.

Here's a digital playland for you.
Thank you for the fantastic set of data you linked there
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
317 Posts
I've loaded and fired thousands of plated 9mm from rainier ballistics using standard data from Hornady 9th. I only load 124gr, my powder of choice is unique.. never an issue. You'll be fine
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
276 Posts
Good info posted previously.

Edit: RN bullets. Around 1100fps is about right for any 9mm Xtreme bullets that they list in their manual. COL's around 1.150.

Consider getting xtreme reloading manual in pdf for $5. ( Reloading Manual ) Skimpy with only a 3 recommended powder loads for each of their bullets, but good for COL and bullet speed as start for another powder's load. It's a cheap way to learn a bit from their section on reloading and supporting a company that's been shipping bullets to me for the last two months within weeks when others have not had any available or took a month to get it here.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
636 Posts
Being a new reloader I would start at min and work my load to where I want it to be.
Start slowly and work up always.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
293 Posts
Why don't you start with JACKETED and learn to reload before giving yourself problems you don't need. All new reloaders should start with jacketed.
Even better, DON'T use plated bullets at all. You've spent money for the gun and reloading equipment, so why cheap out on bullets? Buy high quality jacketed bullets (I really like Zero bullets from Powder Valley or Precision Delta jacketed bullets) in bulk. You'll have a lot fewer issues and likely much more accurate ammunition.
Load data? START at the start load. Either work up using lead bullet data for that weight of bullet or work up to mid-range jacketed data. This is what your plated bullet company says and has been standard for several decades. It used to be a bit simpler: use lead bullet data for that weight of bullet or for a heavier bullet.
NOTE: DON"T call the START load the MINIMUM load. It is NOT the minimum load, it is the safe starting load based on the maximum load. If you check, you'll find the start load is almost always 10/12% below the max load. Only 296/H110 in some manuals uses a start load less than 10% of max.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
276 Posts
What has been said about jacketed being more forgiving and therefore a good place for beginners to start is true. However, unless you can get some jacketed in the current component scarcity and you already have the Xtreme plated bullets there's no reason for you not to use those.

You might want to start with an empty, UNPRIMED case with NO powder in it so you don't waste primers and powder while experimenting. You can invest in a bullet puller (inertia ones are pretty cheap and effective) and remove the bullets from the cases and reuse at least the case (bullet might be deformed).

Bell (enlarge) the case mouth somewhat excessively, to the point where the bullet will sit in the case without you holding it. Seat the bullet using your dies and press. If you see shaving of copper or lead off the bullet when seating them, then stop and bell the case deeper.

Once you get an assembled cartridge to seat the bullet securely without shaving off anything from the bullet, completely load (primer, powder, bullet) a few cartridges (maybe only half dozen to start). Test them at the range. I'd suggest only loading one at a time for the first few. Then, if there are problems, you don't have to deal with multiple live rounds in the gun.

Once you get comfortable that the ammo fires ok, you can start lessening the case mouth bell. The only bad thing that excessive belling will do is shorten the case life a little as it works the brass more.

Reloading is very safe, but you have to respect that you are dealing with potentially dangerous materials and be careful. Take things one step at a time and pay attention to details and practice safe procedures that loading manuals teach.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
295 Posts
Why don't you start with JACKETED and learn to reload before giving yourself problems you don't need. All new reloaders should start with jacketed.
Even better, DON'T use plated bullets at all. You've spent money for the gun and reloading equipment, so why cheap out on bullets? Buy high quality jacketed bullets (I really like Zero bullets from Powder Valley or Precision Delta jacketed bullets) in bulk. You'll have a lot fewer issues and likely much more accurate ammunition.
Load data? START at the start load. Either work up using lead bullet data for that weight of bullet or work up to mid-range jacketed data. This is what your plated bullet company says and has been standard for several decades. It used to be a bit simpler: use lead bullet data for that weight of bullet or for a heavier bullet.
NOTE: DON"T call the START load the MINIMUM load. It is NOT the minimum load, it is the safe starting load based on the maximum load. If you check, you'll find the start load is almost always 10/12% below the max load. Only 296/H110 in some manuals uses a start load less than 10% of max.
Good points +1.
Negative 1 for sending him after zero bullets, mainly because there are zero, zero bullets!

More than likely that's one of many reasons why he has plated bullets. Which load and shoot just fine.Especially for 9mm plinking.

I run SNS Casting, Acme, or Missouri, all coated 148 DEWC with Vihtavouri N32C, in whatever case and primer I can find. These work great on steel, and are pretty darn accurate coming out of a pair of 2.5" snubbies at 15M.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,181 Posts
I've shot thousands of Xtreme bullets. I ran em in 357/38, 9mm, .45ap and .44 magnum. They'll take any jacketed load short of top magnum loads. I have a chrony and keep the magnums under 1250.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
I use a good deal of xtreme. I have found as with a lot of others they might very a tad. Use a
mich and see what actual diameter measures. Some are more like lead and some are like jacketed.
Go with that to decide plated, lead or jacket. I would say you can't speed them up enough to much if using safe loads.
Get a Chrony. It will tell you a lot of good information. Can't help you with HS6. I don't use it. Good luck. Be careful.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
293 Posts
More than likely that's one of many reasons why he has plated bullets. Which load and shoot just fine.Especially for 9mm plinking
No, the odds are he went to his local gun store and found the plated bullets to be cheaper/available and bought them. Lead bullet shoot even better compared to the plated bullets I have tried.

PS: Last I checked, Roze Dist. has some 9mm bullets available and some 0.357" bullets that I have used quite happily in my 9x19, 9x21, and .38 Super guns. I did not check their stock at that time for other calibers.
How is Montana Gold or RMR (?) for jacketed bullets.
Since folks are stocking up for the "every four year" election scare, and the all new antifa/BLM civil war scare, added to all the new gun owners have to purchase ammunition, I am afraid that things will be tight for a while.
Also, my responses are not just for the OP but for others who are reading and may like to consider other approaches. It simply makes sense to always tell new reloaders to only use bullets and powders that they have load data for. They have enough problems without creating more for themselves. As much as I love lead bullets in all my guns, I don't recommend them to beginners either.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
295 Posts
Montana Gold seem to also be evasive ATM.
The Swamp has some of their in house jacketed bullets in 9mm: I can vouch for their superior service, and qaulity in their higher grade bullets.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
488 Posts
Montana Gold seem to also be evasive ATM.
The Swamp has some of their in house jacketed bullets in 9mm: I can vouch for their superior service, and qaulity in their higher grade bullets.
A few thousand Montana gold and Everglades with no problem. Haven't shot them lately though.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
488 Posts
There's a lot going on in this thread. Sometimes I think it's a disservice for newbs to post on a gun forum to get information. You get opinions from all angles and it can be hard to sort out. Sometimes you get erroneous information but the community usually does a good job of policing up after itself with corrections.

Here's my take and it's the most pertinent. In my never to be humble opinion.

The main reason plated bullets have a recommended velocity limit is to prevent leading. The same reason they recommend a light (taper) crimp so you don't break the copper plating. The plating is just that a thin plate that can be broken with a heavy crimp and expose the lead. Excess velocity can also burn off the plating unlike a thick covering jacket of gliding metal. All this adds up to leading concerns which if it occurs negates coating it with copper.

You could probably load up the same amount of powder as a jacketed bullet of same shape, size and weight. The result will more than likely result in leading and not a kaboom if that's your concern.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Andre Coop

·
Registered
Joined
·
207 Posts
How is... ...RMR (?) for jacketed bullets.
I intend to try RMR. I have them on back order. I received a email a few days ago from them that said:
"We wanted to let you know that your order (#XXXXXX) has been sent to our packaging department to be prepared for shipping. THIS DOES NOT MEAN IT HAS ACTUALLY SHIPPED. Just that we printed a label. If your order was on backorder there will be no updated tracking until the items are in stock. We automatically print all the shipping labels when the order comes in so that when the products are back in stock they can be ready to ship right away. "

I was optimistic until I read the note a second time while pasting it here.
 
1 - 20 of 21 Posts
Top