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Grand Inquisitor
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
First of the year. Plenty of black racers, thank goodness, so far to keep the copperheads away, but heavy rain brought out out a small one right by the new work on footings for a screen porch. Juveniles are more dangerous when they strike, too.

My wife, coming back from checking the stock, just knew it was there.

Snakeshot from the Kimber K6S managed it well, as usual.
 

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PA is a copperhead paradise. Damn things are everywhere. Fortunately they tend to be unsggressive and bites are rarely fatal. I see them when walking through a woodland that borders 50 yards from my house. Two days ago for the first time ever there was one under my deck. There is toad family live under there so that is why the snake was there. We have black racers too. That’s a good balance. I am just grateful we do not rattlers near my house yet.
 

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We have a place in FL for the winter months and I bought a Bond Snake Slayer as my wandering around pocket gun. We have enclosed storage underneath (concrete pad) and I opened it up one day and they was a small Coral snake (red and yellow) so I cut it in half with a hoe. It gives opening my rodent bait stations a bit of an edge to it now. We have owned 4 RV's over the years and I have acquired a couple of the extra rods used to open awnings. They are my new best friend for getting things out from underneath.
 

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Here in North Georgia I almost stepped into one coiled with it's head back. They won't always run from you.
Scared the crap out of me. Hard to see in the grass or on the ground.
I'm looking at foot and leg protection when outside the house.
Recommend a strong light if you go outside at night.

PS: Seen a few black snakes too.
 

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Grand Inquisitor
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
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I'm looking at foot and leg protection when outside the house.
Recommend a strong light if you go outside at night.
I need to string trim around the new work today, so no workers get bitten. Will have on heavy snake chaps and my heavy work boots. The chaps go round the entire leg, almost up to my hips, and snap securely over my gun belt. I work in weedy areas on slopes, sometimes, so up to the knee may not suffice.

Better to have them and not need them Than to need them and not have them.

+1 on the strong light. I carry a Steamlight that I can recharge with a USB cable. I used it last night to spotlight the snake as I shot it, since my shotgun with a tac light was in another place. Practice your one-hand skills.

This is the 7th Copperhead in 3 years we have had near the house, in the garden, or dog run. Four were shot at night, spotlighted, as I walked to check on something. One of our big Anatolians got bitten on her snout and was in a world of hurt for a few weeks.

So watch you steps and keep the grass short :)
 

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Exalted One
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Here in central VA in an area called the Wilderness. No venomous snakes other than copperheads, which come and go depending on the year. If I could figure out a safe way to trap them and release across the stream from us (or miles away), I would - even though it is technically illegal in VA. So they are relegated to snake shot from a Heritage .22LR bought specifically for that sad task. Have used shovels and axes and machetes and even tree pruners in the past - all ultimately successful but not quick or humane in any respect. We love animals of all stripe, so even a kill of a copperhead that is not immediately a threat is very painfull, with lots of "I'm sorries" following. I got the Hertitage specifically to make it quick.

All other snakes are welcome here; I just wish the Copperheads would choose to camp out beyond our stream and property line, where they're no immediate threat to our horse or our barn cats.
 

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We have a small farm in southeast NC and raise goats and chickens. Where you have animal feed, you have mice, and where you have mice, you have snakes.

We kill several copperheads a year, and have to watch our step around the feed containers. I carry a Heritage 22 with shot shells when working around the animals, and have used it quite a bit on snakes. I let the non poisonous snakes go, but the copperheads and cottonmouths gotta go.
 

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Exchequer
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I'm interested in hearing from those of you who've been dealing with Copperheads and other venomous snakes as to a good brand of gaitors. Our new house is on nearly 3 acres of heavily wooded, sloped land and NE Tennessee is home to several venomous snakes. Also, anyone here ever been "saved" by a pair of gaitors?
 

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I'm interested in hearing from those of you who've been dealing with Copperheads and other venomous snakes as to a good brand of gaitors. Our new house is on nearly 3 acres of heavily wooded, sloped land and NE Tennessee is home to several venomous snakes. Also, anyone here ever been "saved" by a pair of gaitors?

Thick with copperheads here. Including one the made its way inside into the master BR to be discovered by the better half at 6 AM one morning last year after an addition got a make over with windows and doors replaced. Apparently it gained ingress during "lunch hour" when openings were truly open with no observation a few weeks before. Knee high snake boots are the best bet. If dealing with a slope for clearing, string trimming, etc.; snake boots plus chaps are the best bet. My property sounds similar in setting. We're on a western facing slope. If you get gaiters be sure to do the "needle test" on them.
 

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"The Real Deal"
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We have a small farm in southeast NC and raise goats and chickens. Where you have animal feed, you have mice, and where you have mice, you have snakes.

We kill several copperheads a year, and have to watch our step around the feed containers. I carry a Heritage 22 with shot shells when working around the animals, and have used it quite a bit on snakes. I let the non poisonous snakes go, but the copperheads and cottonmouths gotta go.
Yes water moccasins/ cotton mouths, which are very aggressive and copperheads too. Several rattlers too here. Have to keep your eyes open, and 410 ready.
 

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Yes water moccasins/ cotton mouths, which are very aggressive and copperheads too. Several rattlers too here. Have to keep your eyes open, and 410 ready.
We have wetlands on the back of our property, and I’ve seen cottonmouths the size of my arm back there. I’ve got deer blinds back there, and have been surprised by a cottonmouth in my blinds a couple times. The winters aren’t very cold here anymore and I have to be careful going through the wet stuff.
 

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Grand Inquisitor
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Discussion Starter · #19 · (Edited)
I'm glad you can snake-shot them and be rid of them.
Here in CA, that would be a felony in Sacramento county.
That is another reason why we live in the country. In town, firing a gun in public is a misdemeanor so I would keep a loooong handled hoe on the back porch for “nuisance” copperheads, legal to kill here under state law. Killing other snakes is not legal. I even let copperheads be, in the woods.

Out here there are just other farmers, none near enough to hear a small-caliber report.
 

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Grand Inquisitor
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2,540 Posts
Discussion Starter · #20 ·
I'm interested in hearing from those of you who've been dealing with Copperheads and other venomous snakes as to a good brand of gaitors. Our new house is on nearly 3 acres of heavily wooded, sloped land and NE Tennessee is home to several venomous snakes. Also, anyone here ever been "saved" by a pair of gaitors?
Once these chaps were tough to find, but there are so many brands now. Some are advertised as copperhead proof or rattlesnake proof. Mine button at the cuffs, which I prefer to zipping. Zippers get crud in them and can jam plastic ones in particular.

Check how they attach to your belt, too. Mine work well with a holster for any of my guns. All my outdoor rigs are full flap.

I do not wear snake proof boots, because my Georgia Boot or Redwings worn when farming are steel toe and the chaps cover the upper and back. I adjust them so I do not step on the back, too. Make sure the ones you buy have good hardware, not cheap plastic, so you can adjust the length.

As with guns, buy quality product; spend $200 and they will outlast you.
 
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