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I'm not concerned about cylinder turn lines on my revolvers. I shoot them all and consider the turn lines to just be a part of owning and shooting revolvers.

However, how many trigger pulls does it take on average to develop a cylinder turn line?

I know this is like asking how many licks does it take to get to the center of a Tootsy Roll Pop.

I ask because I am watching an auction on Gunbroker in which the seller claims to have only shot the SP101 20 times. Yet there is an obvious cylinder turn line that seems to be evidence of heavier use. Is this guy trying to pull one over on a buyer or would 20 shots alone cause a line. check out the link below for pictures.

Ruger SP101. 357 Magnum Stainless 3 inch barrel EX : Revolvers at GunBroker.com
 

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Maybe only 20 rounds through it, but who knows how many dry firings?
 

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From Land of Fruit & Nuts
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I have several hundred rounds through my GP100 and more than 100 rounds through my SRH Alaskan and the cylinder turn line is not as dominant. You are right to ask the question.
 

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Fewer turns on a blued revolver will show a turn ring. But it seems to vary. My S&W 686 has thousands of rounds through it with just a faint turn ring, while my SP101 and S&W 637 both have just hundreds of rounds with more pronounced rings. Turn rings are like tire wear--unavoidable.
 

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My LCR had one after just a few times around the ring. My new cylinder is much less noticeable.

Ruger ended up replacing the cylinder when I sent it in due to a transfer bar malfunction. It would still fire, but the firing pin wouldn't rebound after striking the primer.
 

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As a general rule, turn lines on Rugers and Smiths are a fact of life. The bolt, or cylinder stop if you prefer that nomenclature, pops early in the cycle, particularly in double action. This helps make sure that it doesn't race past the cylinder notch, especially in fast double action.

Colts, i.e. the Python, have a different lockup but if you start to really go fast in double action a turn line will appear. In Single Action Armies, where fast draw contestants did an awful lot of fast shooting, it is not uncommon that the cylinder notch lead-ins be lengthened so the cylinder doesn't skip past the bolt.

I'm sure a good gunsmith can set up the timing differently for a Ruger but I've never bothered or worried about the turn lines.
 

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The turn line is more visible on that firearm than on my new SP that I have dry fired 50 times or so (the trigger was so bad that the cylinder would lock up and not rotate at all). Will do a trigger job on it or send it back to Ruger. I don't think the price is good for a used SP, but then I don't care much for gunbroker as the prices always tick me off (even before adding shipping and FFL fee). My brand new sticky trigger SP cost $505 from my LGS when I could finally find one.
 

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Ausmerican.
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After 100 rounds with my SS.
 
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