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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have over 500 rounds through my LCR (38 model), mostly 38 special with a few +P. I love the little gun and I wasn't expecting a swiss watch; but it has always been a little loose. I don't think I have stretched the frame, or peened the crane much with the shooting I have done, but it has an .008+ (depending where you measure) BC gap, and .0055 endshake. I have never seen any information or utube videos on how to remove the ejector extension to get the cylinder off the crane so endshake washers can be added. In addition, I have not seen endshake washers specifically for the LCR and I don't know if they cross reference to any other revolver. Any suggestions?
 

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Don't worry about endshake until it stops firing. I don't know what the specs are for cylinder gap on the LCR, but. 006-.009 is not unreasonable and I would think anything less than. 005 is too tight.

Shoot it until it quits working and then send it into Ruger for a rebuild.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
VA27- Don't worry, I plan to shoot this gun until it is no longer safe, which should be a long time. Also, I am not concerned about the .008-.009 BC gap; but the endshake is out of spec as far as most revolvers go. If I can lengthen the life of the gun with a couple of washers, is seems like a simple enough thing to do. Specifically, I was wondering if the ejector rod came out like the security six by unscrewing the left hand threads. I was also wondering, before I started twisting, if I need to be concerned about lock tight being used. Finally, if the proper endshake washers don't exist, then the job gets more complicated.
 

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Call Ruger and tell them what your specs are, worst case scenario they send you a prepaid shipping label and you get a new LCR.
 

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I've posted twice about disassembling the LCR cylinder. No one seems to know how. I'd just like to know in case I ever need the spare springs I have for them, or another problem.

I've got .006 and .005 gaps on my 357 and 22, with shakes no more than .002, IIRC.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
bearcatter: Last week I picked up a LCR22, which I also love. The BC is .007 and the endshake is .004. - definitely tighter than my 38. I agree with you that it would be nice to know how to disassemble and inspect the cylinder and crane mechanisms. I am reluctant to put serious effort into unscrewing the ejector rod until I know if it is a right or left hand thread, and if they perhaps used a type of Locktite that requires the part be warmed before unscrewing. Both guns shoot well, so I do not need an immediate answer, but I plan to keep looking. It is good to know that other people are also interested, and that an answer is not readily available. At least I did not miss something obvious. I will post the information if/when I find out the proper method of disassembly, and I will keep you in mind to make sure you are onboard.
 

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As stated by others in this thread; keep shootin' and don't worry. You'll know when it's time to tune the cylinder when you begin to feel a "gallop" or periodic "tension" in double action.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks for "weighing-in" everybody. I plan to keep shooting (48 rounds yesterday) until I can learn more, and then I will re-post anything that might interest everyone.
 

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I've posted twice about disassembling the LCR cylinder. No one seems to know how. I'd just like to know in case I ever need the spare springs I have for them, or another problem.

I've got .006 and .005 gaps on my 357 and 22, with shakes no more than .002, IIRC.
Ran across this again yesterday, and knew those numbers sounded wrong. I got out my gauges and checked them again.

The 357 B/C gap is .005, 22's is .004. Folks should know this is with the cylinder pushed forward firmly. Pushed back, I get a snug .009 and .008. So both endshakes are a smidge under .004.
 

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I have an LCR .22 and the B/C gap is .007". The gap with the cylinder pushed forward is about .0015". That means I have about .0055" fore/aft movement. If I point the muzzle up and close the cylinder, the back of the barrel will hit the frame (has chipped the coating already). It's a new replacement LCR that I just picked up yesterday (not shot yet). The first one I had had an .011" B/C gap and was splattering lead all over the frame, forcing cone area and flutes. It was a mess, so after about 3 1/2 weeks I received a replacement. With this said - the B/C gap doesn't concern me, but the slop in the fore/aft movement does. Should I be ... Or am I being way too picket for a revolver ?
 

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I posted a detailed reply about my first, and replacement, LCR-22s on your other thread:

http://rugerforum.net/ruger-double-action/63158-ruger-lcr-22-cylinder-rubs-rear-frame-normal.html

Are you sure you're checking your B/C gaps correctly? The actual barrel/cylinder gap is with the cylinder pushed snugly forward, but not as hard as you can. Then you push the cylinder back, snugly, and measure again to figure the end shake. The feeler gauge should just lightly rub in a good measurement.

Ruger's B/C gap "standard" is .003-.008. I've been told this by reps on the phone. Most leave the factory at .005-.007. Endshakes average .004-.006, IIRC a post Iowegan made.
 

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As an addition, I posted this somewhere on RF already. A member PMed me about an email answer he got from Ruger about disassembling the LCR crane.

The ejector extension (the part you push to eject the brass) is left hand (reverse, or righty-loosey) thread, and it is thread locked. You have to very careful not to scar it up or bend it when unscrewing it.

Of course, Ruger recommended that all LCRs should be returned to them for service and repair.
 

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Yeah, I believe I'm measuring them correctly. I may be pushing the cylinder forward a bit too hard, so it may be closer to .002", but for some reason, my feeler gauge set doesn't have a .002" ... WTF ?? At any rate, the gap seems acceptable and the fore/aft play may be just the way it is. I just found it weird that it actually could contact the rear frame when held muzzle up while closing the cylinder. On the other hand, you would never close the cylinder muzzle up anyway, unless you wanted to lose all your cartridges. Thanks for your response - I appreciate.
 

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I think you're good to go. Your gaps are in spec, and the cylinder closes well in "normal" positions. Your B/C gap is on the smaller side of good, which most people like.
 

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Dave007, It really doesn't make much difference but true B/C gap is measured with the cylinder wedged forward. Any endshake will appear to increase B/C gap. If you have ever used endshake bearings (washers) they will remove excessive endshake but true B/C gap will not change. The most important thing is to subtract the "held forward" cylinder gap from the "held rearward" to get the amount of endshake.

Here's an example: Lets say you measure the B/C gap at .006" with the cylinder wedged forward. You then measure the B/C gap again with the cylinder wedged to the rear at .010". This indicates an endshake of .004". When two .002" thick endshake bearings (.004" total) are installed, endshake is reduced to zero but the B/C gap will remain at .006". This concept holds true with all single or double action revolvers.

I don't know what the Ruger factory specs are for an LCR but the general "gun smith" specs are not less than .002" nor more than .005" for endshake in DA or SA revolvers.

When endshake gets excessive, you run the risk of having the cylinder latch release under recoil. This can allow the cylinder to misalign with the bore and can result in a dangerous situation for the gun and the shooter. Usually you get a warning …. meaning misfires due to light primer hits.
 

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Dave007, I guess it depends on where your information is coming from. In gunsmith school back in the early '70s, we were taught to measure the way I outlined in my last post. Non-gunsmith school graduates may come up with a different procedure. Endshake bearings will repair endshake but it won't change true B/C gap. If you send your LCR to Ruger, tell them it has excessive endshake.

Here's a photo that shows the proper procedure for measuring the B/C gap. Note the brass wedge that is used to push the cylinder forward. True B/C gap is .004"



Here's how to measure for endshake. Subtract the measurement in the first photo from the measurement in this photo (.006"), which is an endshake of .002"

 

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Dave007, I undeleted your post #18. As you can see, it was a near duplicate of your other post …. your mistake, not mine. Part of the moderator's job is to clean up duplicate posts so the poster doesn't look stupid.

I really don't care how you measure a B/C gap as I noted in post #16 …. just trying to help you understand the right way.

SSBN620GOLD, Yes, an automotive gap gauge is the best tool for measuring B/C gap. The better sets go as thin as .001".
 

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Also my barrel to cylinder is out of align. I can shine a light down the barrel and see the edge of the edge cylinder on one side, that with cylinder locked/hammer cocked, looking down through the barrel -unloaded of course. :eek:
Guess I have to send my new gun to Ruger for repair. :(
Yes...IIRC that means the timing is off. I know it is an old thread you brought back from the depths, but I would contact Ruger right away.
 
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