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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a new model single six .22 cal, can I swap in a ruger .22 cal magnum cylinder in that frame. I am told that the ruger frame is one of the strongest.
Thank You
 

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like models of "like" vintage (era) guns often the cylinders will interchange, and can drop right in, BUT you must make sure it "times" (locks up on ALL 6 chambers) the rest is kind of rudimentary once the cylinder had been fitted to another gun, same typre ,model and era and it may work , but most of the time it simply will NOT go in, so don't force it, and other times it may drop in BUT as I said if NOT from that gun, it may be loose, end shake ( head space)...better to err on the side of caution and have it checked out by some one who "knows" what they are doing...but I see all too often guys at the range , shooting, plinking whatever, and pick up the wrong cylinder from a buddies gun, and lo and behold it "worked"............
this used to happen more often in the days of the 'old models, and BOTH cylinders LOOKED the same, fluted, NO "22 Magnum rollmarkings...once you are used to using and shooting either ,both 22 lrs and Magnums it becomes second nature to simply glance and "know" just which is which caliber....that 2 thosuands inch difference will stand out, as well as the 'chamber' ring further down inside the chamber on the mag cylinders...................and obvisly the 22 mag will NOT fit ( chamber in the LR) but it does work the other way around and you won't be the first guy who shot a .22 LR or long or short , in a 'Magnum cylinder...again, SAFETY FIRST !! and foremost......
 

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Bore Diameter

There was a post awhile back about this and it was mentioned that the .22 mag bore diameter is larger for the mag. It was recommended using a 3/16" drill bit and checking the bore. Standard .22 the 3/16" will not fit but will
on a .22 mag.
I have tried it on several of mine and it seems to work, it will fit the convertibles but on the standard .22
Might be worth a try.
.22 mag .224" dia.
.22 LR .222"-.223"
 

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Goferit
Several new and used mag cylinders on ebay and GunBroker gun parts section. I've done this drop in swap on several over the years without a problem. Colt Frontier Scouts rarely fit trying any spare Colt mag cylinder.
 

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Just shoot the ammo that the weapon was intended for!
.22 LR and Magnum IS THE AMMO it was intended to shoot! Unless a single 6 has a serial # below 150,000 from way back in the 1950s, It's intended to shoot both.


Everybody wants to play schoolteacher to give admonitions whether or not they know enough to know if it's in the context of the thread.

And it's not a weapon unless used as a weapon which is the minority of firearms, especially 22s.
 

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People always say timing could be off, but in 30 years of swapping cylinders in Ruger SAs, I've never encountered an added cyl. that required re-timing, it's just that rare. Even using Colt cylinders in Ruger mid frames! Timing is not the issue!

Cases in point; look at the tens of thousands of convertibles Ruger makes each year with two cyls that both time correctly in the same gun. It's the Ely Whitney "uniform parts tolerance interchangeability" invention at work. That's not to say it couldn't happen, but it would be a rare exception.

ADDING A CYLINDER-THINGS TO KNOW:

The only fitting typically required on a cyl swap is the overall length because the individual cylinder frames vary due to the hand grinding of the frame castings. It's easier and cheaper to fit the cylinders to the frames than to make all the frames precisely the same size.

WHICH MODELS CAN SHOOT MAGNUMS:

All New model single sixes can use interchangeable cyls.

And all old models with 3 screws, if over the serial # 150,000. Before that # the barrel bore was sized for 22 LR only and the 22 Mag bullet is slightly larger.

Guns are all just marked ".22 cal." except old model 'magnum only' and 'magnum convertible' single sixes marked "Win. .22 RF Mag. Cal."
Only old models prior to c. serial # 150,000 are not considered convertible because they do not yet have the compromise bore size of .224".

The new and old model cyls will both work. In general the only difference is that OMs are fluted and NMs are non-fluted with a 22 mag stamping.

TO GET A CYLINDER OF PROPER SIZE:

You can purchase a used Mag cylinder usually around $75 more or less, on the forums, ebay, Gunbroker, etc. In 30 years I have never installed one or heard of one that did not function and "time" correctly. They are assembly line produced to a common plus or minus tolerance. The exception and only important issue is that it has enough overall length for your frame at the front hub which is fit and sized to each individual frame window. If too long you can dress it down and is simple to 'fit' with a little stoning, usually under .005", that's not a lot. To have a gunsmith do it would be a minimal charge if you're more comfortable doing it that way.

You should take an overall length measurement of your LR cyl with a dial caliper in .001 of an inch and seek one the same length or longer (1st photo). A cyl with a gap as shown at the bottom arrow, in the 2nd photo below: will rub on the end of the barrel at the top arrow because it will move back and forth in the gun called "cylinder end shake" in gunsmith terms.

Cylinders will more likely swap with similar vintage parts:

Overall cyl length is the only most common issue. I have found timing to be very, very seldom an issue in 30 years of working with Rugers.


Photo courtesy of “rugerguy"


Generally if overall length is correct, barrel to cyl gap will be within tolerance:



If it fits in the frame, check for too much for and aft end play ("clylinder end shake"). If nice and snug, check for free rotation and check for a .004" to .007" bar/cyl gap. Cycle the action to confirm all chambers lock u at full cock. And you're safe to go.

One solution for cyls that are too short is a tig welded bead and then filed to fit frame. The other two are drilling out the hub, turning and press fitting a longer one, or drilling out and installing a Colt cyl pin bushing. The advantage of the Colt bushings is that you can use the cyl in more than one gun by having cyl bushings that fit each frame.

RugerForum.com ? View topic - Is welding stainless possible?

Photo by NitroAcres


Note: Magnum 22s are expensive, but the mag cyl will also shoot 22 Winchester Rim Fire ammo which is a bit cheaper with similar performance.

Shims: free shipping, TriggerShims Brand Shim Kits

FITTING CYL/CYL GAS RING BUSHING TO CYL FRAME:

This normally done in a lathe but we don't all have that luxury.
1st check bushing length end to end at 4 places around it to be sure it's square when you start. If not, square up the offending area.

To file bushing, clamp in vise with the end to be fitted pointing up and level using a level. Coat with black magic marker. Use a medium cutting flat file wide enough to cover the end of the bushing. Use in a draw filing position, parallel to the vise and workbench with one hand on each end of file. Push it away and back towards you concentrating on "feeling" the file surface staying flat on the bushing surface as you 'draw file' away from you then back towards you; back and forth. Check the black ink often to observe if it's being removed evenly. Re-coat with ink and keep going. Check bushing length again in 4 places to be sure it's remaining square. Put in cyl and check in gun before you think you've taken off enough, just in case measurements might be a little off. Clean file every few strokes so you don't get any galling or gouging. When done you can smooth up file marks with 600 grit paper wrapped around the flat file using same draw filing technique.


WHICH CYL WILL WORK:

NM 22 LR cylinders are not all the same. Early NM cylinders are the same as OM cyls.
You need to date your gun or provide a serial # and we can identify when it was made.

Old Model and early NM 22 LR Cylinders look like the one on the left with the firing pin groove.
Post c. 1975-1976 New model 22 LR cylinders look like the one on the right, no firing pin groove. Either is correct for NMs depending on the vintage.


RATCHET BOSS DIAMETER CHANGE NM:

Fairly recently and coinciding with single ten introduction post 2010, there was a change to a smaller ratchet boss diam. (same size as the .32 Mag cylinders have had since their introduction in 1984). Personally in all my testing I have found the two different ratchet boss sizes to be interchangeable. But I can't guarantee it in every case.
Late NM .22s have a ratchet diameter of .560” and all the rest of the NMs and all OMs have the large diameter ratchet of .622".
The only things to be concerned with are the OAL of the cyl and the ratchet boss size. Just looking for a NM cyl will not guarantee one that will work.

All the .32s have a ratchet diameter of .560” and the newest .22 I own is a fixed sight, 4 5/8”, #268-03410 from 1995, NR4F model 0645 roll marked Ruger Single-Six .22 CAL. It still has the large diameter ratchet of .622





Old Model Cylinders look like this:



Post c. 1975-1976 New model 22 LR cylinders look like the one on the right, no firing pin groove, BUT do not have shoulders in the chambers.
.22 Mag cylinders can be fluted (Old and early New Models) or non-fluted and marked .22 Mag (New Models only). They always have shoulders in the chambers.

All of the Old Model Super Single-Sixes had fluted 22 and 22 Mag cylinders. The non-fluted Mag cylinders started for the New Models in 1975 for the Blue guns and in 1976-1977 for the Stainless Steel guns. The elimination of the firing pin groove in the 22 LR cylinder roughly coincides with the introduction of the non fluted Mag cylinders but there are transition guns with both old model cylinders or an old type LR cyl. with the new non-fluted type Mag cylinder. The blue guns switched to the new type cylinders around 64-15000 to 64-17xxx c. 1975 or so before the 1976 Liberty marking and the stainless guns switched about 64-70000 c.1977, after the Liberty marked guns.


THE PURPOSE OF THE FIRIMG [IN GROOVE:

Because the hammer on OMs must be manipulated for loading and unloading. When the hammer is lowered from half cock w/o cocking all the way back to complete the cylinder cycle, the firing pin would contact the cylinder face between chambers and wear on the firing tip as it rubs along the cylinder when manually indexed. (Another reason for drag marks between the notches as well.) W/o the firing pin groove you would also see some dimples in the cylinder face from the firing pin when a cylinder is out of time or from sloppy handling of the hammer. Some gun store clerks are famous for this as well as inexperienced SA users.
This is often seen on the OM Mag cylinders and Smith revolvers because they don't have the groove.

So why doesn’t the OM Mag cylinder have the groove?

When the .22 Mag came out, experiments with the same type cylinders with the groove at the rear found that the cartridge would do a lot of spitting and case rupture, so they had to enclose the case head on the .22 Mag. cylinders

No groove on NM cylinders:

Ruger originally put a firing pin groove in the rear of the cylinder to keep the firing pin from battering the cylinder, or breaking.
Turned out, their fear of firing pin breakage was not warranted, because I've never heard of one breaking. And since c. 1975-1976 none of Ruger's .22 cylinders have the groove at the rear. Besides the extra cutting of the groove isn't needed on new models since opening the loading gate locks the hammer. Plus the transfer bar disallows hammer-to-firing pin contact unless the trigger is held back, which eliminates the firing pin from contacting the cyl face when the cyl is not locked in battery. It can still happen but much harder to do.

The service folks at Ruger say they can install a new convertible cyl for $185 including return shipping as of 4/1/15
Any New Model single six can use a Magnum cyl. It's a little expensive to send your gun to Ruger however so you'll have at least $200 in total cost including shipping your gun to Ruger. Much cheaper to buy a gun with both cyls and resell yours or keep them both and give one to your wife, child or grandchild :).
Available in forum classifieds, e-bay or Gunbroker among other places. Price range $65 to $100 for .22 depending on condition and seller. And $100 to $150 for centerfire cyls.
 

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thank you Hondo 44 and what I was going to say, BUT was too tired to type and look for all the pictures......;)
Great job..............


and yes, boys and girls even with all the info he covered above, you can and will find "exceptions", sometimes things just do not work out and we always wondered "why"..
bottom line, "safety first and foremost....."
 

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.22 LR and Magnum IS THE AMMO it was intended to shoot! Unless a single 6 has a serial # below 150,000 from way back in the 1950s, It's intended to shoot both.


Everybody wants to play schoolteacher to give admonitions whether or not they know enough to know if it's in the context of the thread.

And it's not a weapon unless used as a weapon which is the minority of firearms, especially 22s.
As my comment wasn't directed to you, I will put your comment in my "BS" file! Have a nice day...
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Abig thanks to everyone for the input, "Especially Hondo, wow a big thanks, a lot a good info you can only find from someone who has the experience, know how, and patience, It's like an online class, can't than you enough and the time spent on it.
sixgun russ
 
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