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I get the concealed carry deal, got it. The one thing I think that folks overlook is how much your hearing/ringing starts after the first round is fired. Please understand in a situation other than the range, you won't have hearing protection on and maybe not your glasses. So you can't hear can't see now what? I shot one round of a 357 magnum today with no hearing protection on. Instant problems started, ice picks in my ear, ringing, off balance. Just something to think about.
 

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Yeah, I get what you're saying. However, in a life-and-death situation, I think that my ears will be the last thing I worry about, assuming that the threat was eliminated.
 

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I'm already deaf-too many jet engines in my life. I still wear plugs when I recreational shoot however!
 

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Sam, It's hard to talk to the 911 operator when you can't hear.

Many years ago I was deer hunting in Colorado. All day long I had a Blue Jay follow me …. squawking from the tree tops. Of course you don't see any deer when the silly bird warns them. I finally got fed up …. drew my Ruger Blackhawk 357 Mag, and used my Jeep for a rest. After I fired, my right ear started bleeding and I couldn't hear anything but ringing from either ear. It took several weeks for my hearing to restore but with healed pierced ear drums my hearing has never returned to normal. I now wear hearing aids in both ears.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Have you ever tried it to see how accurate you are after your hearing is gone? Or your vision. With a 357 magnum the first round rings your ears the next 5 you are DEAF. Your ears will be the first thing you worry about not accuracy.
 

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I get the concealed carry deal, got it. The one thing I think that folks overlook is how much your hearing/ringing starts after the first round is fired. Please understand in a situation other than the range, you won't have hearing protection on and maybe not your glasses. So you can't hear can't see now what? I shot one round of a 357 magnum today with no hearing protection on. Instant problems started, ice picks in my ear, ringing, off balance. Just something to think about.
I get what you're Sam, But I think I'll disagree you on this and here's why.....I'm going to go out on a limb here and assume you hunt. Have you ever heard the report of your weapon in a hunting situation? I hunt with a TC chambered in 7-08 Rem, its basically a pistol shooting a rifle round. Now maybe its just me, but I never hear the gun go off, I believe its because I'm focused on the game.

I'll admit I've never encountered a situation such as you're describing, (don't want to), but maybe the same audio "shut down" would occur. I'm just throwing that out there, I could and probably are wrong though, but it makes some sense......


Here Kitty Kitty
 

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I think in a "stand your ground" situation where I fire my adrenaline will be pumping so fast that I may not even notice the hearing loss till it is over. I would be so focused at the target that my eye sight and other senses take over. "Fight or flight" for instance. "Eyes on target". And most of all, my survival instincts kick in and if there are multiple targets I can understand the need for hearing but my eye sight will be my biggest friend and life saver. Again, IMO!
 

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I have a similar story to Iowegan's..mine came at the range. I had just picked up my brand new Security Six and a box of 357 ammo. Stopped at the range on the way home to try it out sans ear protection. They had picnic tables for your gear. I was at the 50 yard range and using the table top to rest my elbows I cracked one off...realized I had made a grave error and my ear sealed off. No bleeding thankfully...but no hearing out of the tight ear for a couple of days. Never was 100% again...that and many years as a carpenter with screaming saws pretty well finished them off. Even with hearing aids it's difficult to carry on a conversation with my wife. That being said...if it came down to a life threatening moment..I'll sacrifice the rest of my hearing for choosing to live.

On a side note...I had a red squirrel that was intent on letting every creature in the woods know I was there. My .308 BLR made short order of the nuisance. Out in the woods the sound gets absorbed rather quickly.
 

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I've always been concerned with the potential for hearing damage/deafness but it begs the question... what about people in combat situations? What about all those guys in World Wars 1 and 2? They didn't all go deaf from from hearing one or two shots without hearing protection and they were used to hearing more powerful guns then a .357mag. Lots of vets coming back who weren't completely deaf for hearing gunfire. There must be an adrenaline surge that helps protect your hearing under these extreme situations?

Regarding the .357Mag, I would only load up with this caliber for defense if I had planned on being outdoors most of the time, probably in a camping/hiking/hunting scenario where I'm more likely to face 4 legged threats. No way would I want to touch one off inside a vehicle or in my bedroom against a human threat. I want to stop the threat but I also want to continue to be able to hear afterwards.
 

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Any defensive gun use without hearing protection is going to result in hearing loss. About the only thing you can do to protect yourself is to select an effective caliber that won't damage your hearing as much. I have respect for the capabilities of say the 357 Magnum, but would prefer a quieter round that won't hurt my hearing as much. For instance if I'm going to carry a 3" medium framed revolver I opt for a 44 Special over a 357 Mag for many reasons, but one of them being the lower decibel level.

Decibel Levels

Table 3. CENTERFIRE PISTOL DATA

.25 ACP 155.0 dB
.32 LONG 152.4 dB
.32 ACP 153.5 dB
.380 157.7 dB
9mm 159.8 dB
.38 S&W 153.5 dB
.38 Spl 156.3 dB
.357 Magnum 164.3 dB
.41 Magnum 163.2 dB
.44 Spl 155.9 dB
.44 Magnum 165 dB
.45 ACP 157.0 dB
.45 COLT 154.7 dB
 

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Any defensive gun use without hearing protection is going to result in hearing loss. About the only thing you can do to protect yourself is to select an effective caliber that won't damage your hearing as much. I have respect for the capabilities of say the 357 Magnum, but would prefer a quieter round that won't hurt my hearing as much. For instance if I'm going to carry a 3" medium framed revolver I opt for a 44 Special over a 357 Mag for many reasons, but one of them being the lower decibel level.

Decibel Levels

Table 3. CENTERFIRE PISTOL DATA

.25 ACP 155.0 dB
.32 LONG 152.4 dB
.32 ACP 153.5 dB
.380 157.7 dB
9mm 159.8 dB
.38 S&W 153.5 dB
.38 Spl 156.3 dB
.357 Magnum 164.3 dB
.41 Magnum 163.2 dB
.44 Spl 155.9 dB
.44 Magnum 165 dB
.45 ACP 157.0 dB
.45 COLT 154.7 dB
Interesting that the .38spl is quieter then both the .380acp and 9mm. I wonder where .38spl+P falls in place?

Also, I didn't know that .44spl is quieter then even .38spl and 45LC even more so.
 

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There must be an adrenaline surge that helps protect your hearing under these extreme situations?
There is no such thing as an adrenaline surge that helps protect your hearing. A shooter may not immediately notice the report of a gun, but the damage will be done. Hearing loss is hearing loss plain and simple. The only way to protect your hearing is to not be around loud noises or to muffle the decibel level with hearing protection.

There are lots of vets with hearing loss and many (not all) who don't have hearing loss were in the rear with the gear.
 

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There is no such thing as an adrenaline surge that helps protect your hearing. A shooter may not immediately notice the report of a gun, but the damage will be done. Hearing loss is hearing loss plain and simple. The only way to protect your hearing is to not be around loud noises or to muffle the decibel level with hearing protection.

There are lots of vets with hearing loss and many (not all) who don't have hearing loss were in the rear with the gear.
I understand but we have some here who are reporting that they had tremendous hearing damage/loss from just one shot of .357mag. If that's so then you would think that any vet who saw even minor combat on the front lines would be completely and utterly deaf but that's not the case.

Is it because .357mag revolvers by nature are just so much louder then the semi-auto pistols and rifles used by soldiers in combat?
 

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I understand but we have some here who are reporting that they had tremendous hearing damage/loss from just one shot of .357mag. If that's so then you would think that any vet who saw even minor combat on the front lines would be completely and utterly deaf but that's not the case.

Is it because .357mag revolvers by nature are just so much louder then the semi-auto pistols and rifles used by soldiers in combat?

Good point. The feeling/hearing during and after an adrenaline surge is what it is with that individual. Some may report what they honestly lost as far as hearing goes and others may not. Last year I went to my outdoor range and
forgot my hearing protection. After 2 rounds I went to the office and bought some ear plugs. When I went to go home, my ear protection was in my center console all the time and not in my range bag so I assumed I didn't have it at all. Sometimes I roll my eyes at my own self for being stupid or assuming.
 

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Years ago, when I was in the Army, I ended up in a very short (and one-sided) firefight inside a concrete building, pitting me and my .45 ACP (yeah, THAT long ago) against a very angry feral dog. Not pleasant. For a couple hours, everyone who talked to me sounded like the adults in the “Peanuts” cartoons.

Now, I keep a pair of electronic ear muffs in my bedside table, on top of the pistol safe where I keep a loaded GP100 and two speed loaders. If SHTF, I retrieve the revolver, don the muffs (and turn them on) and then I’m ready.


Jim
 
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Rock concerts, drag racing, road racing, firearms, power tools.
How is it I can still hear? I do have tinnitus in one ear, but it's unrelated to the noise I've been around for over half a century.

Sent from my SM-G955U using Tapatalk
 

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Rock concerts, drag racing, road racing, firearms, power tools.
How is it I can still hear? I do have tinnitus in one ear, but it's unrelated to the noise I've been around for over half a century.

Sent from my SM-G955U using Tapatalk
.....and you know this, how?
 

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Here's a quote from the Mayo Clinic regarding Tinnitus.
Common causes are excessive or cumulative noise exposure, head and neck injuries, and ear infections. It can occasionally indicate a serious underlying medical condition. There is no cure for tinnitus, but there are ways of managing it. ... Most tinnitus is due to damage to the cochlea, or inner ear.
I've been afflicted with Tinnitus for the last 20 or so years. It's always there..you just have to learn how to put it on ignore. Was it caused by all the noise pollution I allowed into my ears? I can't say I for sure, but probably.

I do know this. A few years ago I was awaiting TKR surgery and there was a backup in operating room. To relax me I was given a injection of something. The ringing in my ears immediately and abruptly stopped. I asked the nurse who administered the injection what it was. She told me but I didn't have anything to write it down, thought I would remember it. Never gave much thought of it until months later but could not recall what it was.
 
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