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"The Real Deal"
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Discussion Starter #161
Thanks so much for sharing this with us. I'm in awe of the detail in your layout. I've always loved trains. I can remember picking up friends at the train depot in Junction City, KS with my parents. The locomotive was steam powered and it was a real thrill for a 7 year old to see it up close. I think Union Pacific discontinued using steam on passenger trains shortly after that. That was in 1950. My sister went to College in Colorado in 1957. She traveled by Union Pacific, but by then the locomotives were diesel. One of the trains she traveled on was called the "City of St. Louis". Another was called the "Portland Rose". About 5 years ago the Union Pacific ran one of their old steam locomotives across country. I drove to the old depot (now a museum) to see it arrive. I'm guessing there were several thousand there to watch too. It's a sight most people will probably never see again.
Thats awesome. The UP your talking about is the #4014 big boy 4-8-8-4 and it is a beauty. Would really love to see it in person as well. I cant imagine where the designers began when the laid plans for that monster. That is just mind boggling. I would have loved to seen the locomotives run in the 40's and 50's. Imagine seeing the greta rail guns the germans had being towed by several steam locomotives.

I am blessed to be able to share my layout with you guys, and glad you enjoy it as much as i do, and keep doing. I will continue to update this thread when i make additions in the future so you guys can keep up with the newest details.
 

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"The Real Deal"
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Discussion Starter #162
Ok so now my most prized locomotives from the 40's and 50's era. The Norfolk Western J class 4-8-4 and the little brother to the big boy, the challenger 4-6-6-4. The NW's are #604, #607 and union pacific is #3975. Also have Norfolk Western 2-8-0 # 718.
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Discussion Starter #163
More of up 3975 and nw 607, 604. These units are highly detailed, with smoke units syncronized to the sound, and load based. They run and sound awesome, and very close to the real mccoy.



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Discussion Starter #164
Some more of my locos, (3) SD90/43MACS Union Pacific #8104,8146,8059.
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Discussion Starter #165
Added some underbrush between the tracks
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I just continue to be amazed...

I don't know one train from another, but am loving the layout.

Keep it up.

Aqualung
 

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Discussion Starter #170
I just continue to be amazed...

I don't know one train from another, but am loving the layout.

Keep it up.

Aqualung
Will do. Yes the different kinds of locomotives can be tricky. I put them in 3 categories, Steam, before the safety cab or CW cab widened, and after the cab widened. Basically 2 companies make the diesels, General Electric, and EMD or electro motive division which was once part of general motors. They are basically like ford and chevrolet. GP known as general purpose and SD or special duty difference is the gp has 4 axles, sd has 6. The ge versions were the dash series like Dash 8-40c, Dash 9-44CW and the new evolution series the ES44 etc. They are confusing until you start looking at them, abd researching them.
 

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Discussion Starter #171
The 1660 axial flow combine, i have driven a few of these back when i worked on a farm, still see a few of these around here.

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Discussion Starter #172
Here are a few flat cars hauling m1 abrams tanks and a few bradleys. I see these on occassion pass by the house. Last one was about 2 weeks ago, must have been going to the port.
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In the mid-sixties, I worked for a short while for the C&S railroad. Their claim to fame was they hauled all the Coors beer out of the brewery at Golden, CO in those days. I was a relief clerk on night shift. Two nights a week I checked the line up of outgoing trains from the main yard in Denver. I had to keep track of the tonnage of the total train by checking the waybill for each car. Also had to make sure if there were any highly flammable or explosive materials (High busts) in a car that they were buried at least 7 cars deep from the locomotive or the caboose. The tonnage was important because westbound trains would be going over Loveland pass. The yardmaster would assign the appropriate type and number of locomotives to assure there was enough power to make the pass. Eastbound, south or west could use what they call jeeps. What the heck are those Tacky? Were they what you call GP's?
 

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Discussion Starter #174
In the mid-sixties, I worked for a short while for the C&S railroad. Their claim to fame was they hauled all the Coors beer out of the brewery at Golden, CO in those days. I was a relief clerk on night shift. Two nights a week I checked the line up of outgoing trains from the main yard in Denver. I had to keep track of the tonnage of the total train by checking the waybill for each car. Also had to make sure if there were any highly flammable or explosive materials (High busts) in a car that they were buried at least 7 cars deep from the locomotive or the caboose. The tonnage was important because westbound trains would be going over Loveland pass. The yardmaster would assign the appropriate type and number of locomotives to assure there was enough power to make the pass. Eastbound, south or west could use what they call jeeps. What the heck are those Tacky? Were they what you call GP's?
Yeah, its a slang term some gave the GP models among train fans, were i got it from. Very interesting story, thank you for sharing with us. I always find stuff like that interesting. (y)
 

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The 1660 axial flow combine, i have driven a few of these back when i worked on a farm, still see a few of these around here.

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We have more green ones here. But it is Deere country too. Spent many hours in them over the years. I liked working nights, never knew what you'd see.
 

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Discussion Starter #176
We have more green ones here. But it is Deere country too. Spent many hours in them over the years. I liked working nights, never knew what you'd see.
Aint that the truth night time brings all sorts of interesting things, wildlife, parked cars with fogged up windows, all sorts of crazy things.

There are many green machines here too, a few Massey's, Fords, Hollands Chalmers and Gleaners for that matter. I have driven a ton of Deere's too. Did a wheelie in a 70's model 4440 JD that had a planter on the back and not enough weight on the front. that no clutch power shift from 3rd to 4th is a doosey. :oops:

I also once was plowing a field and came to close to a utility pole with one of the discs ( outer ) and stuck it dead center of the pole. Had to beat it out wirh a 2lb hammer.

I plan to add a few john deeres to the layout. looking for the right touch, and model.
 

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Discussion Starter #177
So i finally got my led lights in and added them to my freight house and equipment repair shop, took several hours but the results were great.
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Discussion Starter #178
Here is the before and after of the repair shop.

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Will do. Yes the different kinds of locomotives can be tricky. I put them in 3 categories, Steam, before the safety cab or CW cab widened, and after the cab widened. Basically 2 companies make the diesels, General Electric, and EMD or electro motive division which was once part of general motors. They are basically like ford and chevrolet. GP known as general purpose and SD or special duty difference is the gp has 4 axles, sd has 6. The ge versions were the dash series like Dash 8-40c, Dash 9-44CW and the new evolution series the ES44 etc. They are confusing until you start looking at them, abd researching them.
I wonder how many people realize those (real) engines are actually electric engines and that's a big diesel engine, running a generator, that runs the traction motors laying down the power to the rail ? And have sanders for added traction when needed to get started or on some inclines. Not to mention there's a bit of a momentum game going on when they are in route for making inclines or declining grades.
 

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Discussion Starter #180
I wonder how many people realize those (real) engines are actually electric engines and that's a big diesel engine, running a generator, that runs the traction motors laying down the power to the rail ? And have sanders for added traction when needed to get started or on some inclines. Not to mention there's a bit of a momentum game going on when they are in route for making inclines or declining grades.
Yes its really interesting how they work, and the engineering behind them. I was also surprised to learn that they usually run at 1000 rpm or less. They sound like they are turning up higher when i hear them go by. Thats amazing. We have a generator at work thats a prine mover sane as some locomotives, its loud when its running, but it can run the entire fire station.
 
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