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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I mentioned this problem in passing on another thread, but since then there has been documentation on rimfire central of the same issue occurring with five other rifles with the same type of stock.

The rifles in question are model numbers 31139 and 31145. These were new this fall and I have read that these stocks will be a limited production run. These rifles are marketed as "optics ready". The standard Ruger 10/22 accessory rail is pre-mounted on the receiver. The 18.5" taper barrel has a dull finish and lacks front and rear sights.

https://ruger.com/products/1022Carbine/specSheets/31139.html

https://ruger.com/products/1022Carbine/specSheets/31145.html

The stocks are synthetic and are somewhat "sporter" in style in that they lack a barrel band and have molded checkering at the pistol grip and fore-end area. The model 31139 comes with a light grey stock and the model 31145 comes with a charcoal-colored stock. The problem that has been documented is a result of these stocks being molded significantly out of spec. I believe these stocks are also available for sale separately.

The problem I had was with a model 31139. But now exactly the same problem has been reported with a second model 31139 and also with four separate model 31145 rifles. The cut out at the bottom of the stock that the trigger group passes through when the barreled action is inserted has insufficient clearance to allow the safety cylinder to pass through even when the safety is precisely centered. And I don't mean it is just a little too small so the safety scrapes a bit. On my rifle, removing the barreled action required the safety lever to actually force the sides of the cut out apart to get the barreled action out. Measuring with a caliper, the width of this cut out was more than 0.1" narrower than that on either of my 10/22 carbine models, one of which has a birch stock and the other a synthetic stock.

The real problem is that in removing the barreled action by pulling the barrel up out of the stock, the safety lever is pinched so tightly in the stock that it gets rotated. If anyone has ever experienced a rotated safety lever they know that this will render the trigger group completely inoperable until it is corrected. If the hammer is cocked, it cannot be released by pulling the trigger. And getting the safety turned back into the correct position often requires complete or near complete disassembly of the trigger group. The problem is described in this article:

https://1022companion.wordpress.com/2015/08/10/as-the-safety-turns/

I have no idea whether all such models are affected but there is now documentation that two rifles with the grey stock and four with the charcoal stock were. And since they all probably come out of the same mold, most or all may be so affected. Individuals who bought these models may find that the first time they remove the barreled action from the stock, their rifle no longer functions. And if they are unaware of the rotated safety issue, or unprepared to fix it on their own, they will have no recourse but to send their rifle back to Ruger.
 

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So....Ruger's lowest priced 10/22 they have released in probably 10+ years (easily found online for $199!) a few people out of the THOUSANDS sold had a issue and this is somehow a major problem? Its a $200 rifle with a plastic stock, of course there will be a few with issues.
It is a VERY MINOR problem that is easily fixable, grab a file and fix it and be happy with your CHEAP purchase!
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited by Moderator)
So....Ruger's lowest priced 10/22 they have released in probably 10+ years (easily found online for $199!) a few people out of the THOUSANDS sold had a issue and this is somehow a major problem? Its a $200 rifle with a plastic stock, of course there will be a few with issues.
It is a VERY MINOR problem that is easily fixable, grab a file and fix it and be happy with your CHEAP purchase![/QUOTE}

It will not be a minor problem for those who find that their rifle is nonfunctional after the first time they remove the barreled action from the stock, don't know why, and don't have the means to fix it.

If six of these newly released stocks have demonstrated this issue and since the stock is molded it is very likely that more will be affected.

I took the time to post this issue as a heads-up to those who may have purchased one. I also took the time to call Ruger CS and make them aware of this problem, which they claimed not to have heard of.
 

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Thanks pblanc.

I am a long time Ruger fan.

It appears some here are so used to repairing the new stuff they buy from Ruger, that they seem to think it is normal to get tools out after you open the box. They think it should be the owners responsibility somehow, to make something work.....weird thinking in my book.
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
Relieving the stock cut out with a file and sandpaper is not a terribly difficult thing to do once you are aware of the need. But by that time there is a good chance that the trigger group will have been rendered inoperable and that can take a lot longer to remedy, even if you are prepared to disassemble and reassemble it. Sending the rifle back to Ruger takes even longer.

In my case, it happened twice. The instruction manual for the 10/22 instructs the user after loosening the take down screw to center the safety cylinder and then "swing the barrel-receiver assembly upward away from the forearm of the stock". When you do this, as you look at the rifle from the right side, you are rotating the barreled action in a counter-clockwise direction. If the safety cylinder is tightly pinched in the stock cut out, it gets rotated in the opposite direction.

The first time this happened to me, I was not aware of the potential issue of the safety getting rotated. All I knew is that the trigger assembly no longer worked. The safety cylinder had lost its positive detents, and the cocked hammer could not be released with the trigger. I had to completely disassemble the trigger group to diagnose and correct the problem.

The first time this happened I chaulked it up to a fluke occurrence. But when reassembling the rifle I noticed that the centered safety lever was actually forcing the sides of the stock cut out apart to get through. At that point, I removed the barreled action again to relieve the stock, and even though I did so very carefully the safety got rotated again, requiring another disassembly and reassembly to fix. And relieving the stock actually required removing a good bit of polymer with files and sandpaper. In my case, I had to take off about 1/16" of thickness on each side of the cut out.

I posted that experience on rimfire central. Another frequent poster (username chaser) then posted he had exactly the same thing occur with four separate charcoal stock versions of the same carbine when he removed the barreled actions to do trigger jobs on them for a friend. Since then, another individual has posted on rimfire central that his trigger group became non-functional after removing the barreled action from his grey stock version of this carbine.

These models were only announced by Ruger in early August of this year. I have no idea how many have actually been purchased. This same thing might have occurred to other owners who were unaware of what caused the issue and have not reported the problem. And there may be other owners who have not yet had occasion to disassemble their relatively new rifles.

If someone has purchased one of these models I would suggest the following procedure be used the first time they disassemble the rifle. First uncock the hammer by dry firing. The safety lever can get rotated whether the hammer is cocked or uncocked. But if it happens with the hammer cocked, you will likely have to disassemble the trigger group by driving the hammer pin out with the cocked hammer under the tension of the hammer spring, which is a bit more difficult. Then carefully center the safety cylinder with your fingers and try to remove the barreled action in a straight vertical direction by pushing upward on the trigger guard as you pull straight upward on the receiver with your other hand.

As soon as you get the action out, carefully check and see if your safety lever has lost its positive detents. If it has, it almost certainly got rotated in a clockwise direction looking at it from its right side. If so, immediately try to rotate it back in a counter-clockwise direction. If the safety cylinder does not get rotated too far you may be able to turn it back with your fingers. If it gets turned too much, the safety spring and detent will push against the flat cut out step on the safety cylinder that accommodates the sear extension when the trigger is pulled and at that point, you will probably need to remove the hammer, and the trigger/disconnect/sear assembly in order to be able to push in on the little safety detent ball with some narrow, thin tool in order to be able to turn the safety lever back into position.

Once you get the barreled action out of the stock, measure the width of the cut out that the safety cylinder has to pass through using a caliper, if you have one. The cut out needs to have a width of at least .900" to allow the centered safety to pass through without interference. If it is less, relieve the cut out before you reassemble the rifle.
 

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Thanks pblanc. We have new shooter that had issues described here regarding getting the stock back together with cutting away some polymer. Lucky for her the LGS got it all back together and with a call to Ruger they are now back at the range. She had issues again later with the safety cylinder. Very curious now to see what Ruger will do regarding this.
 

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Again I stress, I am a huge Ruger fan and have more of them than any other brand in my collection. I own some Ruger stock.

I assume somebody paying minimal attention when they were assembling these guns for sale should have caught the issue. So, they ship product they know is defective and are fine with the costs associated with correcting the issue after the fact.
 
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