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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited by Moderator)
My Mark IV is a gift from god compared to my Mark II's as far as ease of take-down and reassembly but surely the devil himself had a hand in designing the bolt components.

As I speak I am experiencing the horror show some call simple cleaning and oiling but damn Bill, what were you thinking?
 

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My Mark IV is a gift from god compared to my Mark II's as far as ease of take-down and reassembly but surely the devil himself had a hand in designing the bolt components.

As I speak I am experiencing the horror show some call simple cleaning and oiling but damn Bill, what were you thinking?
What's the concern? Are you going beyond a basic field stripping? I recommend using the OTIS limited breech cleaning kit for 17/22. Neither the MK IV or Mini-14 seem to be "rod friendly."

Cue tips are also your friend on the MK IV. Most of my cleaning outside of the barrel is cue tip + Hoppe's No. 9 solvent.

The Ruger Tech Tip videos are also very good.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Just a rant really, as the pistols run reliably when well cleaned.

I have a bunch of Ruger pistols and I shoot them until they start jamming. When that happens, I have to completely disassemble the bolts down to the firing pin and extractor and soak them in carb cleaner to get them good again.

The bolt design is so Rube Goldbergish that I often wonder about the process but I suppose when the Mark I first came out it was hailed as innovative. When they redesigned the Mark 4 for ease of takedown, one might have though they would simplify the bolt as well, but no... lol.
 

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Just a rant really, as the pistols run reliably when well cleaned.

I have a bunch of Ruger pistols and I shoot them until they start jamming. When that happens, I have to completely disassemble the bolts down to the firing pin and extractor and soak them in carb cleaner to get them good again.

The bolt design is so Rube Goldbergish that I often wonder about the process but I suppose when the Mark I first came out it was hailed as innovative. When they redesigned the Mark 4 for ease of takedown, one might have though they would simplify the bolt as well, but no... lol.
Hmmm...

I suppose it makes sense that the firearm would require some "special" attention beyond additional scrubbing if neglected for an extended period of time.

I believe there are a number of users on this forum however that don't clean their guns much without issue.

I'd like to fully disassemble my MK IV one day, but I fear it would bring me more frustration than pleasure :)
 

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I don't shoot mine much, and struggled the few times I cleaned it with long periods of time between cleanings. Got this therighttool all-in-one tool.



It's helpful, mainly for being able to get at and hold pieces with non-marring tool. Some of the frustration is that brand new, the pieces will probably be really tight. Reading about it makes it tougher than seeing it and there is a technique and 'feel' needed to get it right. But, yes there is a 'hokey-pokey-dance' feel to disassembly.

There are videos on the site that were helpful to me.
 

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Just a rant really, as the pistols run reliably when well cleaned.

I have a bunch of Ruger pistols and I shoot them until they start jamming. When that happens, I have to completely disassemble the bolts down to the firing pin and extractor and soak them in carb cleaner to get them good again.

The bolt design is so Rube Goldbergish that I often wonder about the process but I suppose when the Mark I first came out it was hailed as innovative. When they redesigned the Mark 4 for ease of takedown, one might have though they would simplify the bolt as well, but no... lol.
I tend to do as you do, shoot them until maintenance is really needed but many defer maintenance seemingly forever by soaking in cleaner and re-lubing without tearing them down.

Bruce
 

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TerribleD said:
I have a bunch of Ruger pistols and I shoot them until they start jamming. When that happens, I have to completely disassemble the bolts down to the firing pin and extractor and soak them in carb cleaner to get them good again.
With the exception of removing the extractor, I think disassembling the bolt for cleaning is pretty simple and straight forward. To make pulling the extractor easy, I cut a small notch in the extractor plunger.



Now I can easily pull the plunger back with a small slotted screwdriver, and the extractor comes out hassle free.
 

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I don't plan on taking my MKII down again til something breaks or wears out. Toothbrush, bore snake, patches and a little Breakfree seems to do just fine with out disassembly.
 

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Wow! I had no idea the Mk II pistol is so difficult to maintain. Especially the bolt. I've only owned my Mk II Target pistol for about 35 years, though.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Wow! I had no idea the Mk II pistol is so difficult to maintain. Especially the bolt. I've only owned my Mk II Target pistol for about 35 years, though.
I've only had my two for about 20 years and still struggle with first, removing the bolt and then, disassembling the bolt. In addition I've had a half dozen firing pin springs break or wear out over the years.

But thanks, maybe your sarcasm will help all the other posters above deal with their issues on this Rube Goldberg design.
 

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I've only had my two for about 20 years and still struggle with first, removing the bolt and then, disassembling the bolt. In addition I've had a half dozen firing pin springs break or wear out over the years...
Going through six firing pin springs: wow! My pistol's spring was replaced once a long time ago, as it got lost during a rebluing project. I did have a Firing Pin Stop pin break many years ago. I replaced it with a section of appropriate diameter HSS drill rod, and it has been fine ever since. I've only removed the extractor twice, IIRC. I haven't found it necessary to remove it for routine cleaning.

Operating a machine, and repairing/maintaining that machine can sometimes be mutually exclusive. It's just the nature of humans. There are some excellent race drivers who can barely change a tire, as there are some top race mechanics who would always finish last if they were drivers.
 

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I've had a couple firing pin springs and an extractor break. Additionally, I've worn out a half dozen extractors. And I tend to agree with TerribleD that the design of the bolt/extractor interface leaves a lot to be desired. It's a problem of putting a square peg into a round hole. As long as the peg remains sufficiently square, the extractor performs well. Once the peg has galled out of square a bit, the fit is sloppy loose and failures start to occur.

Here's a pic of 2 Volquartsen extractors. New on the left, and nearing end of useful life on the right.



Red show where heavy galling occurs, while pink and yellow are somewhat lighter. Red and pink galling is in/out of the screen as you are viewing, while yellow galling is moving toward the left and in toward the center of the extractor. All of this galling is bad for function, and it would not be happening if the extractor pivoted on a pin instead of floating around in drill holes.

I can't stand failures, so I replace the extractor and FP spring together now after every 10-12k rounds fired. I pull the FP and spring for cleaning after a few hundred rounds, and the extractor for cleaning and inspection during regular pistol deep cleanings (1-1.5k rounds fired). With this regular maintenance schedule, I KNOW my pistols will be failure free on every outing. And that makes me happy!
 
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