Ruger Forum banner

1 - 20 of 38 Posts

·
Banned
Joined
·
269 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Has anyone installed a Wolff Shooters Spring pack on their Ruger Redhawk .44?

Do you need a gunsmith or is this something that could be done easily?

no special tools?

the spring pack reduces trigger pull in a double action revolver.

the factory springs are set at 15 lbs.

the kit comes with 9 10 and 12 lb springs. for the hammer and return spring.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
3,167 Posts
here is a video straight from ruger on disassembly,

I just need to contact ruger and see if I should replace both springs or just one. just trying to reduce trigger pull. without misfires.
1) Ruger will tell you not to replace any spring - they have a "no modification" policy for their firearms satisfaction guarantee. If you ever sent your revolver in for service, they'd replace your aftermarket springs with factory ones before sending it back. That's how they roll.

2) If you can change the oil in your car, you can change the springs in your Ruger revolver, regardless of model.

3) But your posts aren't quite making sense - You're talking about a Redhawk, but a spring kit and action type of a Super Redhawk.

The Redhawk only has one spring, and the Wolff Kit for the Redhawk isn't a 9, 10, & 12 kit, it's a 12, 13, & 14lb with a factory spring weight of 17lbs. The Super Redhawk kit is 9, 10, & 12, with a factory spring weight of 15lbs.

So are you looking at the wrong kit for your Redhawk and misinterpreting your action type, or do you own a Super Redhawk?

4) Either way, I run the minimum power spring in all of my Ruger revolvers, DA, SA, large or small. Due to the generous manufacturing tolerances that ensure reliability, unfortunately, many of them require technical smithing to allow this to function properly. ALL reduced power springs make your revolver less forgiving - weakening your springs increases your lock time, which makes every little nano-meter bobble in your follow through that much more apparent on the page.

Not everybody wants a forgiving revolver that's easy to shoot, but it does make a difference.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
269 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I never posted a link to the spring kit, but Midway sells all sorts of spring kits for any type of Ruger.

I posted both videos, but the model I have is just a Redhawk.

You're right about the spring kit, as in the description of the Redhawk kit states: The hammer spring also functions as the trigger return spring in this gun.

Which makes installation of the spring kit and my decision on which spring to change, that much easier!

I'm glad you brought that minor detail to my attention. Too bad Midway doesn't have them in stock, they are backorderable. might have to order directly from Wolff.


here is a link to the difference on a Redhawk and Super Redhawk.

for some reason I thought I had a Super Redhawk, but its just a older model Redhawk.

Looks like I won't need the special "fork" to change my spring!

Ruger Redhawk vs. Super Redhawk: what?s the difference? ? www.GrantCunningham.com
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
269 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I will update after getting the spring installed.

I just ordered directly from Wolff Gunsprings.

for the Redhawk the lowest spring they had was 12 lbs.

They list that the factory trigger pull is 17 lbs.

I ordered a 3 pack. the total was $13 and some change.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
269 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
starting at que 2:30 in the video, quick explanation on removing the spring on a Redhawk using the disassembly pin found in the handle.

Remove the disassembly pin and push the rod with the spring on it down, remove old spring, replace with new spring, push down, re-insert disassembly pin.

I took my gun apart using a allen key as a punch.

I left the cylinder and trigger guard installed, there isn't very much more I could clean with it out, and it would just be more to install later.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nxVNQPe5s5k
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
269 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Followed along with the Video Ruger produced and it took about 5 minutes. Gonna bag these parts up and wait for the spring to come in the mail and reassemble. Gonna clean everything up while its apart, you can see in the photo how dirty the trigger is.
 

Attachments

·
Banned
Joined
·
3,167 Posts
It took longer for you to write all of these posts and link all of these videos than it should have taken you to do the job. The instructions to change springs on a Redhawk are essentially found in the owner's manual, since it takes the same steps to clean as it does to change springs.

No googling or research needed for me to figure out your misidentification, anyone talking about a 9lb spring and two springs isn't holding a Redhawk...
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
269 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
thank you

It took longer for you to write all of these posts and link all of these videos than it should have taken you to do the job. The instructions to change springs on a Redhawk are essentially found in the owner's manual, since it takes the same steps to clean as it does to change springs.

No googling or research needed for me to figure out your misidentification, anyone talking about a 9lb spring and two springs isn't holding a Redhawk...
If it wasn't for your nack for minor details I may have ordered the wrong part. and for that I have to say thanks.

what can I say I'm bored, and wanted to write a thread for any future Redhawk owners who want to do this themselves.

and if you check out some of my other threads, I did link a pdf file for the Ruger Redhawk manual straight from Ruger.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,095 Posts
Not hard to do but do it in the house. I did mine in the yard on my picnic table and some of the trigger group went flying into my lawn, found some ordered some of the parts. I could have found everything in the house.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
269 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
too cold

Not hard to do but do it in the house. I did mine in the yard on my picnic table and some of the trigger group went flying into my lawn, found some ordered some of the parts. I could have found everything in the house.
haha, I had that happen it the house, went walking with one of pins that holds the trigger spring to the hammer, and lost the pin, walking into the other room, luckily I found it. I have everything in a plastic bin now, and just waiting to get the springs in the mail. I ordered 3 just in case something happened, and I needed another one. Like if I lose one.

The springs I ordered are all 12 pound springs.

What springs did you use, and how much of a difference did it make?

With no trigger spring in the revolver now, the trigger pull feels just about right for me, haha.

I gotta call Wolff tomorrow, didn't realize they closed at 4:30PM. Midway had their spring kit on backorder, and I just want to be sure I'm not patiently waiting for the springs to come in the mail, just to find out a month later that the springs are still on backorder.....

I ordered directly from Wolff, and I would expect that they kept those in stock always. hoping to get it by the weekend at least.
 

·
Ruger Tinkerer
Joined
·
11,898 Posts
You may find you like the lighter pull of the 12 pound spring but discover you have entered the Redhawk no-bang zone. Light strikes are a common problem with the Redhawk running lighter springs and the reason Bowen came up with the longer firing pin retrofit for the Redhawk. I'm not saying you will have a problem but just noting it's a common issue. You've selected the lightest Wolff spring so you'll find out soon enough. This is what Varminterror was referring to in his earlier post - action tuning by a skilled hand is often needed to achieve reliable ignition with a light spring in a Redhawk. The Super Redhawk/GP100/SP101 two spring action is a lot more forgiving of spring swaps and you can often get away with simply swapping out springs and leave it at that. The Redhawk is a different animal.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
269 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I'll have to look at the Bowen pin. Thanks for the heads up. Here is a photo of the trigger guard and the rest of the parts removed. I figured while I was waiting for all of these parts I could spiff it up some.
 

Attachments

·
Banned
Joined
·
269 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Firing pin

You may find you like the lighter pull of the 12 pound spring but discover you have entered the Redhawk no-bang zone. Light strikes are a common problem with the Redhawk running lighter springs and the reason Bowen came up with the longer firing pin retrofit for the Redhawk. I'm not saying you will have a problem but just noting it's a common issue. You've selected the lightest Wolff spring so you'll find out soon enough. This is what Varminterror was referring to in his earlier post - action tuning by a skilled hand is often needed to achieve reliable ignition with a light spring in a Redhawk. The Super Redhawk/GP100/SP101 two spring action is a lot more forgiving of spring swaps and you can often get away with simply swapping out springs and leave it at that. The Redhawk is a different animal.

So did you change your firing pin or what spring weight did you use?
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
269 Posts
Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Ruger

While searching the Bowen firing pin kit, I came across this article that says the firing pin clearance, at least it this Ruger Redhawk, was sufficient to ignite the primer, even with a 12 pound spring.

Real Guns - Stop picking on the Ruger Redhawk!

I guess I will try the spring first, and then consider the bowen kit, or not, maybe just install the factory spring back.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
3,167 Posts
As Wave mentioned, the two spring Super RedHawk action (and Sp101 and GP100) is much more forgiving of spring swaps - not to mention that it uses a lighter mainspring to start with. Because the mainspring does double duty in the RedHawk, it requires a bit more punch. The compounding spring result in the two spring action isn't necessarily lighter, or vise versa, or more or less prone to stacking (feel), but since the trigger reset spring can be manipulated independently from the mainspring, the two spring action allows the "smith" to reduce single action pull without reducing mainspring strength or increasing lock time.

Personally, all of my RedHawks have 12lb or less springs (cutting a few coils and extending the spring) however, all of them have had intensive internal polishing, and all of them required correction of unique poor fitment issues on one part or another. Whether it's a matter of adding a trigger plunger shim (not the part you're thinking), or fitting the trigger to the gullet of the hammer more precisely, there are a few not so intuitive corrections that may be required.

The Bowen extended firing pin is a good product, but generally not an advantage for 357, 44, or 45 revolvers. The harder primer cups on 454c can benefit from a deeper striking pin, but to be honest, most of mine have never had an issue with 9lb springs and factory pins - I do have 3 SRH's currently with long pins though. Replacing the front mounted firing pins isn't for the feint of heart, and doing so for the new rear mounted pins requires a specialty driver/wrench tip.

Most Ruger revolvers leave the factory with excessive hammer nose, such that additional pin strike depth can be gained by simply honing the nose of the hammer, without actually extending the pin itself. This should be corrected using a fixture, lest you create an uneven hammer strike on the frame.

It sounds like you bought the wrong spring pack, as there are "smiths packs" with multiples of the same spring available from Wolff, then a "tuner's pack" with 3 different spring weights. If the 12lb spring doesn't work for you, you're SOL - OR you have to figure out how what parts aren't tracking and figure out how to fit them.

Dykem is your friend. Dremels are not.

I've never seen a YouTube video that described a proper action job on a RedHawk, or any other Ruger revolver for that matter.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
269 Posts
Discussion Starter · #19 ·
I'm going to call Wolff in the morning and see if I can change my order, I don't think it's shipped yet. To get the 12 13 14 spring pack. I hardly shoot the gun, but have seen posts where dry firing the factory spring decreased trigger pull. I looked at a price to get Bowen to do the work on the firing pin, and it was $65 just in shipping. No gunsmiths around my area with tools.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
3,167 Posts
A hammer, punch, file, and sandpaper is all that's needed to drive out the recoil plate retaining pin and replace it.

For the new style rear entry pin, any good smith, or hobby tinkerer can make their own, or have access to buy them. It's not expensive, but it's a unique tip. I made mine in an hour for about $9.

Don't let yourself get too distracted. It's highly unlikely that you'll have a protrusion issue with any RedHawk. The Super RedHawk in 454c is even still unlikely to need an extended pin. An extended pin is also not a guaranteed fix for light strikes.

Plainly - it's very unlikely that you will need, or even benefit from an extended pin.
 
1 - 20 of 38 Posts
Top