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Tri Flow Spray
A little goes a long way. Been using that for years over WD-40 (WD is good for "some" things). Just need to be careful using it around some rubber products and some plastics.
 

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No, I use Ed's Red. I make it by the gallon, adding the optional Lanolin and deleting the Acetone from the mix, as acetone will remove paint. It cleans, lubricates and protects. But I don't user it typically for cleaning my firearms. I clean my handguns in a Ultrasonic cleaner then dip in Ed' Red, drip dry, wipe down and I am good to go of they can live in the safe untouched for years, as every part is coated.

I do use Ed's to clean & protect machine tools, hand tools, etc. using it in pressure assisted hand sprayer.

Why spend $$ an ounce when you can have a gallon that does the same thing, if not better?
 

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No, I use Ed's Red. I make it by the gallon, adding the optional Lanolin and deleting the Acetone from the mix, as acetone will remove paint. It cleans, lubricates and protects. But I don't user it typically for cleaning my firearms. I clean my handguns in a Ultrasonic cleaner then dip in Ed' Red, drip dry, wipe down and I am good to go of they can live in the safe untouched for years, as every part is coated.

I do use Ed's to clean & protect machine tools, hand tools, etc. using it in pressure assisted hand sprayer.

Why spend $$ an ounce when you can have a gallon that does the same thing, if not better?
I must be old, I still use Hoppes and CPL.
 

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I clean a lot of guns per year …. my own collection and many for friends. About every 3 years, I have to buy a new supply of Hoppe's #9 gun oil (2.25 oz bottle) and Hoppe's #9 solvent (1 pint bottle). This cost me less than $15 last time ….. about 5 bucks a year. I figure if I can't afford products made especially for guns, I'll quit shooting, sell my gun collection, and take up a new hobby.
 

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I clean a lot of guns per year …. my own collection and many for friends. About every 3 years, I have to buy a new supply of Hoppe's #9 gun oil (2.25 oz bottle) and Hoppe's #9 solvent (1 pint bottle). This cost me less than $15 last time ….. about 5 bucks a year. I figure if I can't afford products made especially for guns, I'll quit shooting, sell my gun collection, and take up a new hobby.
Thanks Lowegan, Hoppes has worked for me for over 40 years. With this recommendation, I guess it will work another 40, well with luck, maybe 20.
 

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I clean a lot of guns per year …. my own collection and many for friends. About every 3 years, I have to buy a new supply of Hoppe's #9 gun oil (2.25 oz bottle) and Hoppe's #9 solvent (1 pint bottle). This cost me less than $15 last time ….. about 5 bucks a year. I figure if I can't afford products made especially for guns, I'll quit shooting, sell my gun collection, and take up a new hobby.
I'm with you on this. Small bottles of gun lube last me years. For bore cleaning, I purchase a can of foaming bore cleaner and a bottle of Shooter's Choice every two years or so. For basic carbon/powder fouling, I have a large bottle of Hoppes No.9 solvent.

The "Ed's Red" crap has automatic transmission fluid as its main ingredient. ATF belongs inside a transmission, and nowhere else. ATF stains things and is not safe for skin contact.

Motor oil has all sorts of additives, such as viscosity improvers and detergents, that are not needed for guns.

Simple and inexpensive gun lube: mineral oil-based Hoppes oil or Ballistol.
 

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I clean a lot of guns per year …. my own collection and many for friends. About every 3 years, I have to buy a new supply of Hoppe's #9 gun oil (2.25 oz bottle) and Hoppe's #9 solvent (1 pint bottle). This cost me less than $15 last time ….. about 5 bucks a year. I figure if I can't afford products made especially for guns, I'll quit shooting, sell my gun collection, and take up a new hobby.
I think some of the people have a problem with "If a little is good, more is better" and waste more than what they actually need cleaning their weapons.
 

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The "Ed's Red" crap has automatic transmission fluid as its main ingredient. ATF belongs inside a transmission, and nowhere else. ATF stains things and is not safe for skin contact.

Motor oil has all sorts of additives, such as viscosity improvers and detergents, that are not needed for guns.
Couldn't agree more. :thumbsup:
 

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Streetwalker, So is a buck a year too much to handle? If you use gun oil properly and don't spill it, a 2 1/4 oz bottle should last the average shooter several years. Here's some Gun Oil education: First, gun oil is not normal petroleum based, it is way more refined. Gun oil does not contain anything that can contaminate your gun yet it provides good lubrication qualities and it clings to parts exceptionally well for rust protection. All you need is a very small drop on a part then use a cloth patch to spread it until the part feels dry.

Many people think you have to glop oil on until the parts are dripping wet …. like dealing with farm implements. This is exactly what most people do when they use automotive products because it is so cheap …. their concept being "if a little is good, a lot is better". Little do they know …. in a few weeks, the carrier in petroleum based oil will start to evaporate, leaving a gummy mess that instead of reducing friction, it actually increases friction because it tends "clot", almost like blood. The additives in engine oil will cause parts to develop small pits and will eventually eat the bluing off. Here's a very basic question …. if a metal part has pits from using engine oil, do you think that part will increase or decrease friction? So why in the world would someone want to increase friction and potentially damage their expensive guns?

I've mentioned this before but for your sake, I'll mention it again. When I had my shop, a very high percent of the guns that came in for repair were "excess oil related", meaning the owner had glopped oil on parts then when the carrier evaporated, springs no longer can overcome the friction needed to make a part move. Guns don't work well when parts can't move. Further, powder residue will blow back in the bowls of the gun and mix with oil. This creates a very abrasive sludge that resembles rubbing compound, which will wear parts much faster than when no oil at all is used. What many people don't realize is …. automotive oils are made to operate with high temperatures and very high friction …. on the order of tons, not like ounces in a gun, in fact there's no mating parts in a gun that exceeds 25 lbs and most parts have less than a pound of tension. Also, oil in an engine is pumped through the system and filtered. This doesn't happen with gun oil … it is supposed to cling to parts and not attract powder residue so the gun will stay operational.

So I'll ask again ….. is a buck a year too much to pay for proper lubrication and rust prevention in your gun worth hundreds of dollars? I consider it cheap insurance!
 

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Streetwalker, So is a buck a year too much to handle? If you use gun oil properly and don't spill it, a 2 1/4 oz bottle should last the average shooter several years. Here's some Gun Oil education: First, gun oil is not normal petroleum based, it is way more refined. Gun oil does not contain anything that can contaminate your gun yet it provides good lubrication qualities and it clings to parts exceptionally well for rust protection. All you need is a very small drop on a part then use a cloth patch to spread it until the part feels dry.

Many people think you have to glop oil on until the parts are dripping wet …. like dealing with farm implements. This is exactly what most people do when they use automotive products because it is so cheap …. their concept being "if a little is good, a lot is better". Little do they know …. in a few weeks, the carrier in petroleum based oil will start to evaporate, leaving a gummy mess that instead of reducing friction, it actually increases friction because it tends "clot", almost like blood. The additives in engine oil will cause parts to develop small pits and will eventually eat the bluing off. Here's a very basic question …. if a metal part has pits from using engine oil, do you think that part will increase or decrease friction? So why in the world would someone want to increase friction and potentially damage their expensive guns?

I've mentioned this before but for your sake, I'll mention it again. When I had my shop, a very high percent of the guns that came in for repair were "excess oil related", meaning the owner had glopped oil on parts then when the carrier evaporated, springs no longer can overcome the friction needed to make a part move. Guns don't work well when parts can't move. Further, powder residue will blow back in the bowls of the gun and mix with oil. This creates a very abrasive sludge that resembles rubbing compound, which will wear parts much faster than when no oil at all is used. What many people don't realize is …. automotive oils are made to operate with high temperatures and very high friction …. on the order of tons, not like ounces in a gun, in fact there's no mating parts in a gun that exceeds 25 lbs and most parts have less than a pound of tension. Also, oil in an engine is pumped through the system and filtered. This doesn't happen with gun oil … it is supposed to cling to parts and not attract powder residue so the gun will stay operational.

So I'll ask again ….. is a buck a year too much to pay for proper lubrication and rust prevention in your gun worth hundreds of dollars? I consider it cheap insurance!
I shoot 3-4 times a week. About 10 months of the year here in Texas I'm dripping with sweat. I shoot 500-1000 rounds a week through several firearms. I sweat so bad that I have to grease under the grip panels of my 1911 pistols to prevent rust.

I go though a LOT of lube on my firearms.

You claim that gun oil isn't petroleum based, that might be true with Frog Lube, aka coconut oil, or FireClean, aka, rapeseed oil. But many traditional lubes are still petroleum based.

My guns don't get a chance to have the oil dry out. I've got a couple of 1911 pistols that need to be run wet. If they aren't then you're going to have problems.

You go ahead and use your oil and I'll use mine.

BTW, neither oil nor grease "attract" dirt.
 

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Streetwalker, People like you are the reason my gunsmith shop was so successful. I do agree: "You go ahead and use your oil and I'll use mine."
 

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BTW, neither oil nor grease "attract" dirt. QUOTE STREETWALKER

This is what we call in the real world the opposite of truth. Motor oil for cars actually has detergent in it, mixed in with the other ingredients. You know why? TO ATTRACT DIRT! Unless you plan on tearing your motor down every so often to clean out the inside components; this is necessary for an engine to last a long time. Anywhere you get something burning, whether an engine or a gun, you will have a certain amount of residue built up over time. The detergents in motor oil do what you can't do.

Now you might say, if this is the case, why not use that same detergent to clean my gun? As IOWEGAN has said many times, there are ingredients in motor oil that are not very friendly to guns. Is it true? He certainly has the experience I lack, so I will believe him. I do know enough to be able to say that the metals and the tolerances used in making guns is different than that used in cars. Since I CAN get to the inner components in my guns, I won't take the chance and clean them myself. Also, none of my guns has an oil filter to remove the deposits my motor oil would be picking up along the way.

At $170 a gallon, that corresponds to $1.33 an ounce. I use about 4 drops of oil when I lube my guns. I wipe the outside of my guns down with an oil infused cleaning cloth. I'm not certain how many drops are in an ounce, but it must be a lot. Between my wife and myself, we have 7 guns that all get cleaned at least once every 2 months; more when we are shooting more often. I have the same bottle of oil I started with over 3 years ago.

Streetwalker,
If you are shooting 500-1,000 rounds a week, I can't believe you would complain about the cost of gun cleaning products. Even if you are reloading, you have to be going through hundreds of dollars a month.
 

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I changed the oil in my ‘84 Z-28 today,.....five quarts of Butches Gun Oil. It only cost $302 plus the filter.

Why would anyone do that? That same question goes through my mind whenever I hear people talking about using motor oil on a firearm.......
 

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I changed the oil in my ‘84 Z-28 today,.....five quarts of Butches Gun Oil. It only cost $302 plus the filter.

Why would anyone do that? That same question goes through my mind whenever I hear people talking about using motor oil on a firearm.......


+1 Well Said!

The cost of the properly formulated maintenance supplies is so small and when properly, a container lasts so long, I don’t understand why one would not use the correct cleaners and lubes/oils. I don’t understand trying to save a few fractions of a penny per application. And I don’t buy the idea of a massive markup and paying for the gun-specific marketing. Do you really think there is any product that they don’t market the crap out of for its intended purpose?




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I will stick with Ballistol.
 
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