Ruger Forum banner

1 - 20 of 29 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
80 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
hey guys just wanted to know if this is this in any way harmful to the weapon I read that it wont hurt it to practice trigger pull also what is the normal trigger pull on a new ruger p944 thanks Brandon[?]
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
191 Posts
Any Ruger firearm can be safely dry fired. The P345 is the only one that has a condition attached and that is that an empty magazine must be in place.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
80 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
thanks guys the above post worries me a lil bit it but sill not sure wether or not to dry fire:)
 

·
Forum Founder
Joined
·
3,639 Posts
Brandon, Coffee Pot retired from Ruger and he worked with the P-series pistols. He knows, but if it made me uncomfortable I wouldn't do it. I have never dry fired and I don't like to decock them but it don't hurt them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
693 Posts
KP97DC, why don't you dry fire? It's very self-organizing ritual helping a lot if you’re not practicing everyday in a range.
 

·
Forum Founder
Joined
·
3,639 Posts
quote:Originally posted by blade

KP97DC, why don't you dry fire? It's very self-organizing ritual helping a lot if you’re not practicing everyday in a range.
Things that were taught to you as a kid are hard to change sometimes. I was taught not to snap a gun unless you were shooting at something. If you are taught that way, its the same as pointing a unloaded firearm at someone. You just don't do it. I am not comfortable snapping a gun. I don't point a empty gun at anything I don't want to shoot. Old habits dye hard, and I don't have reason to change. Just gives me more reason to snap the hammer on a loaded chamber at a target to stay in practice. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
693 Posts
KP97DC, I'm 100% with you on that. Safety is a must! Perhaps "don't point an empty gun at anything don't want to shoot" does not apply to dry firing, when you put a target on the wall and "shoot" it without live ammo when nobody's hanging around. Well, I guess if you feel uncomfortable doing so, you're right about not changing your habits.
 

·
Forum Founder
Joined
·
3,639 Posts
A Officer was in a habit of dry firing while watching TV. He was watching a Movie and Dry firing at the TV. He loaded his gun to go to work, and laid it on the coffee table, but a special program came on before left and he wanted to see it. After a couple of minutes, out of habit, he picked up the gun and shot out his TV set. Its easier for me to stay away from any thing that could cause a problem than to try to depend on my memory and forget. I don't have a problem with anyone that wants to dry fire as long as its not at me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
191 Posts
Hey guys, as KP97DC said, I retired from Ruger and know 'without a doubt' that dry firing won't hurt a Ruger firearm. However, I'm also of the generation that was taught not to point a gun at anyone nor dryfire it. To me, it's a built-in thing. I don't dry fire guns, mine or anybody else's, unless it's required as in .22 auto disassembly. There are still a lot of guns out there that dry firing will cause damage. In fact, I have a few. As for the man with his P944, I can assure him it will do no harm to his pistol. Just don't make dry firing a habit as one day you may pick up an old gun and damage it by doing so.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
693 Posts
Oh, man! It sounds like smoking while filling a tank of gasoline. Those things must never be mixed altogether. Besides, I would NEVER leave loaded gun on the coffee table.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
80 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
that helps me alot guys i wasnt sure if it is going to shater my pin i have an ithica .22 rifle from the 50s and friends will countinue to pick it up and pull the trigger i cant even find an instruction manual for it i bet a firing pin would be real fun,also i went to the ruger faq section and found this Factory specifications are: Single Action - 4 to 7 pounds, Double Action - 9 to 15 pounds. A certain amount of 'slack' in the trigger pull is characteristic of these types of Military/Police style pistols. great help and safe shooting
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,896 Posts
I don't dry fire my guns, and if I ever show someone one of my guns. I tell them do not dry fire it, if they do any ways I take the weapon from them. And they never touch one of my guns again.
My Dad taught me to respect the gun and it will respect you. We have a plenty of laws about kids being around guns. I lived around guns sure I wanted to touch hold and so forth. Not until the men flk came home from the fields could I touch a gun.
Guess I was raised different I didn't have electricon games to baby sit me. I played out side and made most of my toys, a stick was my gun and we hunted and played army. Boy does that bring back memories.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
540 Posts
Dry firing is routine practice for me. Much easier and cheaper to master trigger pull without it having to go bang every time (and easier to determine what's happening without the noise & recoil).

If in doubt, use snap-caps.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
693 Posts
Hey, fellers, looks like we have a simple misunderstanding of terms. There are two different things co-called "dry fire":
1. Discharge unloaded weapon under no condition;
2. Practical routine of drawing, targeting, and holstering weapon in SAFE environment (usually without going to a range for real bangs).

First one is absolutely NO-NO unless you do second. If you practice, you better to use weight-equivalent NON-LIVE ammo (e.g. snap caps), having live ammo safely locked far away. When you practice you can't watch TV in the same time or do anything else than practice. All safety rules to apply on the routine.

Have I filled the gap? :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,896 Posts
thanks for the site, I'll be ordering some soon.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
693 Posts
Snuffy, if you are reloading, you can make it yourself out of spent brass and cigarette lighter spring using gluegun for filler. Paint it all red and save a few bucks. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,641 Posts
quote:Originally posted by blade

Snuffy, if you are reloading, you can make it yourself out of spent brass and cigarette lighter spring using gluegun for filler. Paint it all red and save a few bucks. :)
Blade ---care to elaborate on this? Thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
758 Posts
I’m an old dry firer from way back, and I think anyone who ever went through Marine Corps boot camp will tell you the same thing, only we used to call it “snapping in.”

We did it for hours with a partner and we would switch off working each other’s bolts to simulate semi-automatic operation. We would go through the same routine each year before heading to the rifle range to qualify. You could always tell the guys that didn’t snap in; the usually didn’t qualify.

I still dry fire before going to the range, especially with a new weapon. If a person has some sort of probation against it that’s fine and it is entirely their business; as for me, I know it helps me to be a better shooter.
 
1 - 20 of 29 Posts
Top