Ruger Forum banner

1 - 20 of 29 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
33 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I just returned from Academy with a brand new SR22. I am quite excited. This is actually for my wife, and the two of us are going to start plinking together.

The instruction manual gives safety suggestions while dry firing, and even says that the SR22 can be dry fired without damage to the firing pin or other components as long as the magazine is inserted.

However, from time to time I see comments from people that don't recommend dry firing a rimfire pistol. Is Ruger simply mistaken with what they say in their manual? I'm not trying to start something here, or stir up the pistol-police who hover these forums searching for opportunities to "right the wrongs".

Thanks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
331 Posts
I don't dry fire any weapon. Broke a firing pin on a 1911! It broke in the middle. Strange but sometimes weird stuff happens, If you need to dry fire. Put a spent casing in the chamber.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
517 Posts
Ur gonna get a boat ton of 'opinions' re dry fire. Follow the manual and you'll be fine. After all....it is the MANUFACTURES direction. Non SR22....22lr, unless the manual says so, no dry fire for me.

And off this thread goes like wild fire........:D:);)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,386 Posts
#4-6-8 by 7/8" plastic drywall anchors make great .22LR snap caps. Rotate them every time you load the mags, since repeated firing pin hits in the same spot will poke through the plastic.

They are good for several sessions each and a box of 100 is only a couple of bucks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
973 Posts
Search the forum for SR22 dry firing. There are a lot of threads on dry firing the SR22 and one a few months ago with a report that dry firing damaged the edge of the barrel. There seems to be a lot of passionate opinions about this topic and which lube to use.

I for one have no problems from dry firing my SR22. I don't sit and fire away countless times, but do several times for function check and finally to release the hammer before I put it away. The manual says it's OK and seems to even recommend it, so I'm not too worried about it.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,681 Posts
I have a couple of Ruger LCR'S in .22WMR that I dryfire the snot out of. By design the firing pin has never made contact with the cylinder. I've shamelessly dry fired every gun I own relentlessly and have never had a mishap. Ruger did replace a firing pin on one of my .22's because it was to short.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
33 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Good opinions here, thank you. Are there certain 22LR rounds I should avoid? I read that if my rounds aren't "fast" enough, it may not send the slide back entirely to eject the casing and chamber the next round. Any tips on this? Thank you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
616 Posts
Good opinions here, thank you. Are there certain 22LR rounds I should avoid? I read that if my rounds aren't "fast" enough, it may not send the slide back entirely to eject the casing and chamber the next round. Any tips on this? Thank you.
There's a variety of "High Velocity" .22lr out there that most semi-autos run better...the standard velocity ammo is fine in a revolver. Funny, but my Walther PPK/s .22lr cycles both very well...I guess it's a brand thing in a way!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
58 Posts
READ THE OWNER'S MANUAL THAT CAME WITH THE PISTOL:

firearm is known as “dry firing.” Dry firing can be useful to learn the “feel” of your pistol. Be certain that the pistol is fully unloaded (both the chamber and magazine are empty) and that the pistol is pointing in a safe direction at all times, even when you are practicing dry firing. The RUGER® SR22® pistols can be dry-fired without damage to the firing pin or other components as long as the magazine is inserted.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,681 Posts
Good opinions here, thank you. Are there certain 22LR rounds I should avoid? I read that if my rounds aren't "fast" enough, it may not send the slide back entirely to eject the casing and chamber the next round. Any tips on this? Thank you.
The only one that I would avoid is the Winchester low end ammo (white box sold at Walmart) In firing it in my revolvers I found it to be dirty, leaving a lot of residue and I had many FTF's with it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
87 Posts
I have dry fired my SR22 extensively without issue for years. My LCPII in .22lr, however, broke the firing pin with admittedly fairly heavy dry firing, despite what the Ruger CS guy said "we built them with a titanium pin expressly so you can dry fire it." They sent me a new pin without issue.

I find that I can run almost any cheap or fast ammo in the sr22. The only round that makes it flunk are the cci shot shells.

Sent from my Pixel 3 XL using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,441 Posts
Stick with CCI minimags in the beginning. They tend to work the best in semi .22's. After you have established that the gun runs well with those, you can introduce other ammo to see what works. If you find one that doesn't, just avoid that one. .22LR can be problematic as a whole by its very nature and many .22 semiautos are ammo picky. If you find a round that is 98% reliable, you are doing fine.
 

·
Retired Moderator & Gunsmith
Joined
·
16,156 Posts
There are many different designs for 22 LR handguns and rifles. The primary reason NOT to dry fire a rim fire gun is .... in some brands / models of guns, the firing pin will strike the chamber mouth or the cylinder. This can damage the chamber and possibly break or peen the firing pin. Ruger has a good solution for all of their rimfire guns .... for their SA and DA revolvers, they use a limited travel firing pin and recessed chambers in the cylinders. When a cartridge is NOT chambered, all the firing pin hits is air. For Ruger pistols, they are designed with a firing stop pin that limits firing pin travel. This means if the chamber is empty, the firing pin will be short of striking the chamber and only hits air. 10/22's and other Ruger 22 LR rifles use a similar firing pin stop pin that prevents the firing pin from striking the chamber mouth. Further, Ruger uses a specific alloy for firing pins that prevents them from being brittle so they don't fracture, and are not so soft where they peen.

Many years ago, the market was flooded with cheap 22 rimfire rifles that did not have any firing pin protection. This started the trend of "Don't dry fire 22 LR guns" because some guns would get damaged. Most manufacturers now have some sort of firing pin protection, however it's always a good idea to read the owner's manual for your specific gun before you dry fire.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
410 Posts
As usual, Iowegan presents excellent facts.

However, a box of yellow plastic wall anchors is so cheap that I use them in all of my 22's no matter what the owner's manual says. Perhaps I am an over-protective mother.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
33 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
I bought a box of (prepare for a mouthful) Winchester Super Suppressed 22LR 45 grain Subsonic Black Copper-plated Round Nose rounds. I read that since these are subsonic, these aren't as fast as typical 22LR rounds. Would these be sufficient rounds to shoot out of my SR22 for plinking? Or do you think I might have a few issues since these are subsonic and maybe a little slower? (No I don't have a suppressor).

The box does not have a muzzle velocity, but the Winchester website said these are rated at 1090 muzzle velocity.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
973 Posts
Maybe, maybe not. I've shot CCI Standard velocity - 1070 fps - and it's cycled just fine. I shot a lot of HV before trying the lower velocity so maybe that helped lighten the recoil spring some. The only ammo I've had issues with is Winchester Super X. The bullets were a tad too wide and I had feed problems in all my 22lr guns.

Only way to know is to try it and see how it works.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,386 Posts
As usual, Iowegan presents excellent facts.

However, a box of yellow plastic wall anchors is so cheap that I use them in all of my 22's no matter what the owner's manual says. Perhaps I am an over-protective mother.
Some .22s are dry fire safe (as mentioned by Iowegan). Some are not (e.g. CZ 75 Kadet .22 conversion). Easier to just use the drywall anchors than to remember which ones need them (guessing the Hi Standards do).
 

·
Retired Moderator & Gunsmith
Joined
·
16,156 Posts
Zokfend, Those 45 grain bullets rated at 1090 fps should cycle just fine in your SR22. The recoil spring and slide assembly has a +or- thrust rating based on a normal high velocity cartridge with a 40gr bullet. A 40gr standard velocity cartridge's slide thrust is about 90% that of a high velocity cartridge and your 45gr bullet will develop about 102% slide thrust versus a 40gr Hi Velocity cartridge. Where you might run into a snag is with accuracy. The twist rate for a SR22 barrel (1:16) is made for 40 gr or lighter bullets. 50gr bullets may not stabilize at the much lower muzzle velocity so you may see "keyholes" in your target and poor groups.

Just an FYI .... velocities for 22 LR cartridges are rated with a 20~24" barrel so you won't get anything close to the factory rating with a 3.5" or 4.5" SR22 barrel. The Winchester ammo you posted will likely chronograph at about 750 fps from a SR22 ..... no where close to the speed of sound , which is about 1150 fps +or- depending on climate factors.

You could save a lot of money without forfeiting function if you buy bulk grade 22 LRs. My SR22 eats anything and because it is not a match grade gun, it will produce 2~2.5" groups at 15 yards no matter what ammo I use. I normally shoot Remington Golden Bullets (36gr). Cheap entertainment with good results.
 
  • Like
Reactions: FastEddie

·
Registered
Joined
·
33 Posts
Discussion Starter #20
Such great and detailed comments. Thank you all so much. I'll let you all know how it goes; me and the wifey plan on shooting it in a couple weeks.
 
1 - 20 of 29 Posts
Top