Ruger Forum banner
1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Most of the posts I've read about this are quite old. Not to say they are not correct but I would like to contribute a method that I use that will hold up to the normal use of holsters and firing.

To start, unless you would want to completely disassemble the firearm, this method will not include painting the interior. You would never want to spray paint the inner mechanisms of a firearm. So to begin, lets say we painting a handgun with a slide and polymer frame.

Remove the slide from the frame and prepare the polymer for painting. Use a rubbing alcohol or alcohol wipe to clean the polymer of any grease or chemical. Tape off the inner mechanisms of the frame or anything else you do not want to paint. Rustoleum makes a universal bonding primer, this is what I typically use. It is very important to use these paints as directed on the label. With the primer I spray several light coats until total coverage is achieved, usually 2-3 coats. Next a rustoleum enamel, I dont use rustoleum double coverage paint plus primer. Just a ordinary can of rustoleum enamel in the color of your choosing. I prefer to use flat/matte colors only on this stage and achieve the desired finish with the clear coat. Anyways, multiple light coats with the color of choosing. Once, that is done and directions on the label have been followed, a clear coat for protection needs to be applied. Now personally i can not imagine why a gloss clear would be used on a handgun but to each his own. I would use a matte/satin clear. Once again several light coats to achieve total coverage. Also, I believe rustoleum dries best at around 80 degrees fahrenheit but if you can't paint at that tempature its fine. I just wouldnt attempt paint at anything lower than 65 degrees. A very light buffing pad can be used to remove dust and overspray after clear has dried. Thats it!!

For the metal slide the only difference in painting would be the initial step. You will want to start by sanding the slide just scratch it up for better adhesion. The universal bonding primer will work but you could also use an automotive primer. The rest of this process will be just like painting the polymer.

Im aware there are better more professional ways of painting a firearm. However, this method can be done at home and in my experience will hold up to the punishment of everyday use.

"The tree of liberty needs to be replenished from time to time with the blood of patriots and tyrants"
-Thomas Jefferson

-B Ham
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
39 Posts
Most of the posts I've read about this are quite old. Not to say they are not correct but I would like to contribute a method that I use that will hold up to the normal use of holsters and firing.

To start, unless you would want to completely disassemble the firearm, this method will not include painting the interior. You would never want to spray paint the inner mechanisms of a firearm. So to begin, lets say we painting a handgun with a slide and polymer frame.

Remove the slide from the frame and prepare the polymer for painting. Use a rubbing alcohol or alcohol wipe to clean the polymer of any grease or chemical. Tape off the inner mechanisms of the frame or anything else you do not want to paint. Rustoleum makes a universal bonding primer, this is what I typically use. It is very important to use these paints as directed on the label. With the primer I spray several light coats until total coverage is achieved, usually 2-3 coats. Next a rustoleum enamel, I dont use rustoleum double coverage paint plus primer. Just a ordinary can of rustoleum enamel in the color of your choosing. I prefer to use flat/matte colors only on this stage and achieve the desired finish with the clear coat. Anyways, multiple light coats with the color of choosing. Once, that is done and directions on the label have been followed, a clear coat for protection needs to be applied. Now personally i can not imagine why a gloss clear would be used on a handgun but to each his own. I would use a matte/satin clear. Once again several light coats to achieve total coverage. Also, I believe rustoleum dries best at around 80 degrees fahrenheit but if you can't paint at that tempature its fine. I just wouldnt attempt paint at anything lower than 65 degrees. A very light buffing pad can be used to remove dust and overspray after clear has dried. Thats it!!

For the metal slide the only difference in painting would be the initial step. You will want to start by sanding the slide just scratch it up for better adhesion. The universal bonding primer will work but you could also use an automotive primer. The rest of this process will be just like painting the polymer.

Im aware there are better more professional ways of painting a firearm. However, this method can be done at home and in my experience will hold up to the punishment of everyday use.

"The tree of liberty needs to be replenished from time to time with the blood of patriots and tyrants"
-Thomas Jefferson

-B Ham
150200
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
603 Posts
The British painted lots of their small arms 50 to 100 years ago . Lots of it is still on guns that were used pretty hard .
Often though they painted over Parkerizing .
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Top