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Discussion Starter #1
I had an oven control blow during a power surge caused by the water utility (long story there). It's a digital panel on the backsplash of the stove.

I also had a TV and VCR/DVD die, but replacing internal fuses saved them. I was surprised that the oven control does not have a fuse. $100 for a rebuilt one, new was not available.

I want to add an inline fuse to help save it if there is a "next time". It has a transformer on it, but not marked. I see one item on the board that is marked 5 amps, but doubt that matters.

Anyone know how I could determine which size fuse to use?
 

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That really depends on what the oven control actually does. Do you have any paperwork on the oven? Schematics would be nice.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
That really depends on what the oven control actually does. Do you have any paperwork on the oven? Schematics would be nice.
I can possibly find the schematic online, but the stove is 15 years old.

It's a printed circuit board. Uses the smooth panel with touch pads, same as microwave ovens. I know the control is 120 volt, off one leg of the 220 input. It controls a clock, the oven temp, the timer, and the self-clean. Everything but the surface elements for pots. They still work.
 

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howdy bc; the load of the oven burners does not go through the board (too many amps). the board handles the timing and controls by sending its signal through a relay. therefore the need for a high amperage fuse is not there. the 5 amp reading you found may in fact be a fuse or circuit breaker. if it is the load of the control board, it would not be unreasonable. the easiest way to fuse the board would be an outdoor pigtail socket in series with the wire coming from one side of your 220-240. put a one shot screw in fuse in it and away you go. Dixie helped me with this.
 

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I can possibly find the schematic online, but the stove is 15 years old.

It's a printed circuit board. Uses the smooth panel with touch pads, same as microwave ovens. I know the control is 120 volt, off one leg of the 220 input. It controls a clock, the oven temp, the timer, and the self-clean. Everything but the surface elements for pots. They still work.
I can't imagine a control like that using more than about 1/2 Amp. But an MOV rated for 150 Volts or as low as you can find that is about 10% more than the actual voltage at your location, may be what you need. If you have or can borrow an Amp meter you could measure it?
 

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Discussion Starter #6
The 5 amp gizmo is a black plastic cube on the board, maybe a relay? One point that may help is that the board runs off of a wire that comes straight from the bus bar where the 220 cord attaches. I wish the transformer on the board was marked better than a short number and "Mexico".

I found a schematic of sorts in a pocket on the back of the stove. All it shows is a "map" of the components, no voltages or other values are given.
 

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I can possibly find the schematic online, but the stove is 15 years old.

It's a printed circuit board. Uses the smooth panel with touch pads, same as microwave ovens. I know the control is 120 volt, off one leg of the 220 input. It controls a clock, the oven temp, the timer, and the self-clean. Everything but the surface elements for pots. They still work.
If you can easily get to the 120v wire coming into the panel, you could use an inline twist type of fuse holder, (like for a car stereo). Those fuses are cheap. Most industrial supply houses carry 120v fuses of that type.
 

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If you want to get creative, find the 120 volt power feeding the control panel circuit board and wire an actual surge protector into those lines.

That would protect the circuit board electronics while not interfering with the higher voltage lines to the burners and oven.
 

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Easiest solution would be to wire an inline fuse into the 120 lead going into the board, but this may not stop a power surge from ruining the board again. A fuse is basically there to keep an item from drawing too much amperage and melting wires. A power surge may simply increase the voltage without really affecting the amperage draw, which may not blow a fuse. Best solution would be an surge protector inline, or perhaps just whole house protection. I'd probably just spend the $100 for the new control and let it be. Look into whole house protection, or simply buy a new stove next time the control goes bad. If its already 15 years old, it will probably be due for replacement the next time it fails anyways.
 

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Oh yeah....I would imagine a 5 amp fuse would probably be more than enough. My advise would be to buy a simple inline fuse holder and a selection of fuses. Start at 5 amps, and work up if needed. Unless the wire coming into the board is incredibly thin, 5 amps wont hurt it. Depending on the size of the wire, you could probably safely move up to around a 20amp fuse if needed. (if lower amperage fuses keep blowing)
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Thanks, everybody!

I did not realize that there was such a thing as a surge protector I could splice into the feed wire. That sounds like a good solution without figuring out the amperage for a fuse.

The stove is 15 years old, but compared to average people, it has maybe two year's use. We seldom use the oven or the burners. Our microwave gets worn out instead.
 
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