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I practice more with handguns because it is what I carry and they are harder to shoot. A long gun is much easier to be accurate with. Getting old might have something to do with it. I would much prefer to grab a shotgun, PCC or an AR than my pistol in the house. Hard to carry them concealed. I make my wife practice with her handgun. She much prefers the rifle but she does not want the rifle sitting next to her side of the bed or mine for that matter. The pistols are out of sight in the nightstands.
I do shoot rifles at 50 to 100 yards and occasionally out to 300 yards so I know what to expect. When I was hunting I used to zero the 06 3" high at 100 yards which put me in the kill zone out to 300 yards. If I remember the actual zero was around 220 yards.
I remember the 1st time I saw a moose. I wanted a 300 mag. I used a 375 H&H to kill one. Looking back it was only 25 yards and I could have used my 12 gauge with Brenneke slugs. All the moose we saw were close.
I'm with you regarding the difficulty of shooting handguns. They do take a lot more training to use to their fullest potential. I also shoot mine a LOT more than I do my rifles. Part of that also has to do with the ease of getting range time for handguns, and part of it is also the ease of cleaning them after a range session when compared to a rifle.

I actually keep my daily carry P365 between the bed frame and mattress so I can grab it if need be in the middle of the night. It isn't to get me to a long gun, either. I am comfortable enough with that pistol that I have the utmost confidence in what it can do for me if the chips are down.

Back in July, I fired some of my long guns, and it was the first time in a couple of years that I'd touched them. So far, I've been discovering that a lot of people I've been out shooting with since I retired from the Army don't shoot rifles standing very much. Most shoot only from benches or prone. Practicing firing while standing unsupported is a valuable skill with a rifle, though, and I've always practiced it. It was just never as fast as a handgun for me, though.

I learned some techniques for using a rifle at closer ranges from a detailed discussion I had with someone I talked to while shooting my Redhawk at the range the end of 2021, and I dry practiced some of what he told me at home. When I finally applied it in July, that first time in a couple of years that I ever touched a rifle on a range, I was pretty impressed with the results.

I'm now going to be integrating more rifle training into my range regimen. I got pretty inspired when I was popping clay pigeons set up about 25 yards a lot faster than before with that c-clamp method. I'll continue shooting from a standing unsupported position to do it, too. I'm going to be pushing it back out to 100 yards for those standing shots. I had good results at 50 yards back in August on a B-29 target with my Galil Ace using the MBUS irons. I got a Sig Romeo 2 for it, and I'm going to be using it at 100 with that.
 

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Sight your 30-06 in at 200 yards, then go to Shooterscalculator.com/ballistic-trajectory-chart. Fill in the data you have on your ammunition, then see what kind of drop you have at 600 yards with a 200 yard zero.

Or not. Just sight it in for 200 yards, and get within 200 yards or less.

The whole object of the trip is to have fun, so just get ready for it. Pack what you need to be comfortable and just do it.
Hunting isn't about the kill. It's about being on the hunt in the woods. I've spent a lot of time hunting and brought back nothing. Where I used to hunt hogs, it was luck of the draw as to whether or not they would wander through my ambush spot. In the end, just having spent a few hours hanging out either in a stand or a likely patch of brush was good enough to enjoy it.

Learning all of the little sounds like distinguishing between a raccoon, possum, otter or armadillo crashing through the brush and the sound of a hog moving creates a connection with the woods that one could never otherwise achieve. Recognizing the sound of a lizard jumping onto a palm frond and distinguishing that from the sound of something else falling from higher was another fun thing.
 
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