Ruger Forum banner

1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've been reading about lightly crimped bullets jarring loose and jamming up the works in light-weight revolvers. I didn't think about that before buying one. Not that it would have stopped me, but of course, I have a bunch of boxes of it sitting around from when I used to really be into revolvers. Is it really a bad idea?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,560 Posts
Are you asking about your title or the body of your post?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,142 Posts
From what I know, crimp jump is typically an issue only with non-rimmed cartridges like 9mm. The FBI load in .38 special which is rimmed. I've never heard of crimp jump being an issue with either the LCR38 or LCR357.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Spike - Basically wondering if shooting factory lead SWC hollowpoint (or not HP) is OK in the LCR.
I've recently read more than a few posts that they should be avoided, and that a jacketed round such as the Speer 135gr (and a few others) are preferable.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
286 Posts
jumping crimp happens, or CAN happen, in any revolver. The recoil impulse gives the non fired rounds in the cylinder a sharp rearward jerk during recoil. The bullet, being the heaviest part of the cartridge, tends to want to "stay behind" during the recoil impulse. Thus, it can sometimes pull the bullet far enough out of the cartridge to tie up the gun on the rear of the barrel. Lead bullets tend to be more lubricious than jacketed, and when they do NOT have a crimping groove, make out for a worst case scenario.

as revolvers get LIGHTER...this problem gets more pointed, as the guns weigh does not dampen recoil as much as a larger, heavier gun, thus the recoil is that much snappier. Think of a scandium 357, a light, but powerful gun. If bullets don't have firm crimp, after 4-5 repetitions of recoil those bullets can be pulled enough to be a problem.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,746 Posts
jumping crimp happens, or CAN happen, in any revolver. The recoil impulse gives the non fired rounds in the cylinder a sharp rearward jerk during recoil. The bullet, being the heaviest part of the cartridge, tends to want to "stay behind" during the recoil impulse. Thus, it can sometimes pull the bullet far enough out of the cartridge to tie up the gun on the rear of the barrel. Lead bullets tend to be more lubricious than jacketed, and when they do NOT have a crimping groove, make out for a worst case scenario.

as revolvers get LIGHTER...this problem gets more pointed, as the guns weigh does not dampen recoil as much as a larger, heavier gun, thus the recoil is that much snappier. Think of a scandium 357, a light, but powerful gun. If bullets don't have firm crimp, after 4-5 repetitions of recoil those bullets can be pulled enough to be a problem.
Great explanation.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
141 Posts
Also, I'm thinking a factory lead semiwadcutter would have a pretty good crimp.

Try it. Load 5, shoot 4. Leave the unfired one in there and load 4 more. If it doesn't jump crimp in 2-3 cycles, I think it's good.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,482 Posts
I've been reading about lightly crimped bullets jarring loose and jamming up the works in light-weight revolvers. I didn't think about that before buying one. Not that it would have stopped me, but of course, I have a bunch of boxes of it sitting around from when I used to really be into revolvers. Is it really a bad idea?
You can still crimp them again. Just don't mess around trying to use semi-auto bullets or plated (no crimp groove). The FBI load and its lead hollow point should not be a problem with an adequate crimp, but if you overdue any crimp, the lead can mushroom at the case mouth and make the round oversize.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top