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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
After lots of research I finally have my press set up and produced my first 3 loaded rounds. Of course, I produced a hand full of inert ( dummy ) rounds for measurement purposes. The Lee die sets instructions give a diagrams that give MAX length of the case .754 inch or 19.15 mm. The overall length of the finished bullet should be MAX 1.169 inch or 29.69 mm. After making sure that this criteria was met, I removed my barrel and used it as a chamber tester. My reloaded rounds were below the max length (oal) , and went into the barrel flush like the store bought factory rounds. They also freely dropped out of the barrel like the factory rounds when tilted upwards. The difference ,I noticed was that the factory rounds turned freely when twisted with my fingertips and the loaded rounds did not. I think this is due to the factory rounds being smooth copper coated and my reloaded rounds are lead. Any insight on this ? I stopped at 3 reloads because I realized that that the primers were not sitting flush. They are the correct small pistol primers and I did clean the primer pockets with the little pocket cleaner tool that came with the Lee 4 hole turret press. Any insight on this issue would be appreciated.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Question about load data........... A friend of mine gave the load data from his data manual. He gave me 4.3 to 5.5 grains . I ended up going with winchester w231 powder. I went online to a site called (hodgon). I think this is the company that makes winchester 231. I found the range to be 4.3 to 4.8 grains. I'm using a lead 115 grain bullet with a diameter of .356. Can anyone with a load data manual please, look up this load so I can see if there is any kind of match up to what I or my friend found ? The chart I found online said (115 GR LRN ) . I'm not sure what the LRN part stands for. Thank You.
 

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LRN = Lead Round Nose

Stop what you are doing and get a reloading manual or two of your own. Lyman 49Th Edition Reloading Handbook ... and The ABCs Of Reloading: The Definitive Guide for Novice to Expert would be a good place to start.
 

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What Larry said !!! Get your own book and be sure to start low and work up but never to max. The bullet needs to have a taper crimp you should not be able to move it. Lee make a crimp die that works great. You may have gotten one with the 4 die set. Also the loads listed in the books will have a OAL listed for that load. (over all length)

Good luck and be safe
 

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Get a book, and get a cronogragh, other than looking for signs of over pressure, a crono is the best way to know what the ammo you are making is doing.
Primers, try using more force while seating them.
 

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Do not mix load data and bullet types, you can wind up with some deadly mixes. Different bullet profiles are different lengths and can dramatically increase chamber pressure even tho the OAL is correct for a different bullet type.

Please, get a manual and read, read, read... Then read some more
 

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Sorry if this sounds harsh, but anyone who reloads with out a manual or three is an idiot!!!!!!!!!!!!

You are dealing with small explosions that can KILL you if you screw up.
Have you ever seen a picture of a gun that has exploded because of a reloading mistake?

The above mentioned ABCs & Lyman manuals are two that experienced reloaders suggest all the time.
They're the best 2 manuals for new reloaders.

The data available from Hodgdon - The Gun Powder People is as accurate as it gets.
You can trust them, heck, they make W231.

Please stay safe!
 

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I have been reloading for two months now, and have at least 6 manuals.. Read, Read and Read... I still only have 1/16 of the knowledge that is needed..
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I appriciate all your concerns and on the advice of this thread, i will be purchasing a manual. On the other hand I have been researching the subject intensely .The research is all part of the fun. Of course , I value my safety more than anything . I utilize these forms as an information source and I also give back when I can . Never ! would I ever include an insult attached to my information . Yurko, and anybody who feels the need to insult people in the process of helping them can .STICK! that information . Now I never want any thread that I start to include negatives or name calling . all that does is ruin the fun and creates bad feelings toward the website . I am a middle aged man that can take criticism and I'm willing to learn from anyone . if you don't mean to sound harsh then simply don't be . Once again, I appreciate all the responses and I'm taking the advice given .
 

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brigond ... hang in there buddy ... most of us mean well even if it doesn't sound that way.

After being away from the reloading hobby for more than 25 years, I am just now starting to get back into it. Although the basics are still the same ... much has changed (sorta like photography). So I'm approaching my re-entry with the mindset of a novice ... acquiring new manuals and methodically going over everything I think I used to know.

Read, read, read ... and then read some more ... is the best advice we can give ourselves. Stay safe and have fun ... it's a satisfying and rewarding hobby.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
brigond ... hang in there buddy ... most of us mean well even if it doesn't sound that way.

After being away from the reloading hobby for more than 25 years, I am just now starting to get back into it. Although the basics are still the same ... much has changed (sorta like photography). So I'm approaching my re-entry with the mindset of a novice ... acquiring new manuals and methodically going over everything I think I used to know.

Read, read, read ... and then read some more ... is the best advice we can give ourselves. Stay safe and have fun ... it's a satisfying and rewarding hobby.
Thanks Larry , looking back on his ( Yurko) post, I'm not too mad at him. I see that it was in the name of safety. I would expect that kind of talk from someone I know or someone I'm friends. Just not from a stranger in a forum.
 

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brigond, well come to the reloading world. I to am rejoining the reloading world after 40 years. it has changed quite a bit with the different powders. just be very careful with reloading. some powders can be very close from a (start load to a max load) in 9mm. I hand weight each loadafter finding out that my powder measure wasn't droping the same with titegroup. It was fine with other types of powders but not with titegroup. so be very carefull an have fun. TOMD1943
 

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Especially starting out use reliable published data. Do not guess do not get close. There is too much info out there to guess or expeirment. Know the rules before you attempt to bend them. Take it slow and keep it fun. Get any of the bullet makers books and consult with the powder makers data. Hornady or Speer manuals have a good getting started section on setup and the whys and hows. Like I said keep it fun but, be safe!!!!
 

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Just to add a practical thought or two on the manual. I bought a couple of manuals -- Hornaday and Lyman -- before I began to try to determine if I could even do this stuff.

I found the investment saved me a good bit of money that I would have otherwise have wasted on unnecessary or too complex stuff. I probably saved enough to pay for the manuals (I was about to buy a very expensive automated powder measure for example).

The manuals convinced me to start simple and learn every step.

Just trying to support the good advice you have already gotten in this thread -- good luck.
 
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