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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Long story made longer, I had a VA appt. that wrapped up early, I had taken the day off from work anticipating 4-5 hours of waiting in between them, but.......got done at 1030 am so, I had the day free to roam the countryside.......

I ended up at a local gun shop that I probably haven't been to in several years, I had bought several guns there in the mid-2000's, but they changed hands, and I don't stop in as much.

I walk in, look around, it was crowded but through the people I see a 10" .44 Super Blackhawk, $599,..........meh, just don't need it. Neat looking gun, but no, not what I need at this point. No other interesting Rugers, that I can see, or anything else of interest. A Luger pried at $1500, a Webley Mark V, some high-end collector stuff that was there in 2003 and will still be there in 2023......

Flush with some cash from selling some other guns, I keep looking. Nothing special, figured I was about to bag it for the day and go home. Then I see this Mark I 6" , in the original box sitting on the bottom shelf of the display case.......hmmmmmm, marked at $399.......not a steal, but not bad......I asked to see it, I know nothing about the Ruger Mark series, being a Ruger wheelgun nut, I don't know about "pre-Marks", Mark I's, etc. but from what I gathered it's a Mark I.

It looked pretty much mint, a little handling wear on the grip like it was bumped on something, a little damage to the chrome on the trigger. The box is largely irrelevant to me,since I wanted it to shoot, but it's some nice "deal candy"......the dealer tag says "Made in 1963". I asked the guy who's worked there forever who brought this in, he just says an older guy brought it in on a trade, said he never really used it. The owner said a lot of people had come through and looked at it, however, in my neck of the woods, people want bargains, and won't pay $400 for a Ruger .22. But, I will, because I'll actually use it:) Sure, I could have gotten the same gun in slightly lesser condition for $300-350 on GunBroker, but it wouldn't be THIS one, bought on this day, from that gun shop:)

So, given the largely fair price, given the hardly fired condition, I find myself telling the owner that I'll take it:) I'd gotten some steals from them in the past, like the 1930's Colt Police Postive I paid 200-some odd for years ago, so I figured I'd eat $50 or so and have the enjoyment of actually buying in person and supporting a local dealer,and not some faceless GunBroker type mega-dealer or getting a Mark III off Davidsons, and going through yet another soul-less cold transfer deal at my local dealer. Sometimes buying in person at a gun shop, and having a "story" to go with buying the gun, is the better way to go.

A Mark .22 wasn't at the top of my "needs" list, but I had wanted one for a while. Having just placed my CZ85b on the auction block, that sees little if any use, I figure, I'd actually buy something I can use, and have fun with.

Guns like this are, in my opinion, more than just "guns", but pieces of Americana, to use a high-brow word here. How many of us grew up shooting .22's like this, probably most of us. For me it was a 10/22 I got for Christmas when I was 13, and the S&W .22 pistol my Dad and me would take to the range when we lived in NJ, and put zillions of rounds through. Single Sixes, 10/22's, Mark I standard models, these were made for shooting cans, having fun, shooting with Dad, punching paper etc.

Now I live in rural PA, and guns like this have been carried all over the woods, fields and dirt roads of where I live, you can still walk around in the woods and find decades old watering cans and tin cans full of .22 holes laying out in the woods, from long forgotten plinking sessions.

So, this Mark I will continue to fill it's role, as a fun gun, a plinker,a "field" gun.......it doesn't try to be "tactical", no one cares about it's "stopping power", capacity, or any of that. It will see no Stingers, Mini Mags, just lots of standard velocity bulk pack .22.

Hopefully soon I'll take it to my parent's house and me and my Dad can shoot it in their back yard, the way it's supposed to be, going back to the days when it wasn't all about gel tests, one shot stops, mounting lasers on guns or pinpoint accuracy:)
 

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If it has adjustable sights, then it is a Mk I
If it has fixed sights, then it is a Standard Model

either way, it will be a fun little shooter
 

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Thanks for sharing. Your story just made me look forward with more excitement to my next trip to the range.
I regret passing up on not one but two Marks earlier this year.
 

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That's a classic Standard, A54 grip frame. Mark I era gun. That's the model gun that I used to teach myself the basics of pistol shooting a very long time, ago and I've only rarely been without a Mark, since. Don't let a little wear bother you. Aside from a rare replacement part, it's almost impossible to wear one out. Shoot it and enjoy and get ready for some great accuracy.
 

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Nice find...good luck & happy shooting with it!
Also, congrats for leaving NJ and finding Freedom
in the elusive land west of the Delaware River (I'm jealous) :)
Thank you for your service to our Country.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Great information, thank you all:)

I don't know if the Mark II or III mags will fit this gun, I was going to keep the original mag in the box and use newer ones for shooting, instead of just reloading the one mag over and over again.....

The more I look at the mag wear, wear on the slide, etc. it looks like this one has hardly seen any use. The 6" barrel was a plus, since that was the barrel length I would have gotten the Mark III Standard Model in.

Like a lot of us say, one gun usually leads to others, now I think I need an "Old Model" Single Six 6.5" to go with it......then maybe a 3-screw .357 Blackhawk.....
 

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You cause MKII mags in your Standard, but if yours is truly a 1963 gun, you will have to switch the mag follower on the new mags over to the right side of the mag, the way your original is setup. Not a big deal and the MKII mags are ten shot, instead of nine and function better than the early mags.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thank you for the info:)

Having been a "wheelgunner" since I was a kid, I can break down a Six or GP100 in my sleep, I've retimed S&W's in between movies in my basement, but getting into Ruger auto chuckers like this and the P-series guns, I feel like I'm starting all over again:)

I had found some original Mark I-series mags but they're like $50-75 if you can find them.

I'm thinking I may just hope the original mag works, and use that for now, before I easily spend more than the gun is worth for a few mags, I'll definitely check out altering Mark II mags, since Mec Gar still makes new aftermarket Mark II mags.
 

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You did real well. That's a pistol that will make you happy to shoot it. I have a 1968 Standard with the 4" barrel. Never ever gave me any issues. Fires any and all ammo I have tried. Accurate and fun. I only buy used, older models from any maker. Ruger and Smith & Wesson in particular. You can keep the new guns with all their "improvements" and don't get me started on plastic frames. I have some friends that bought SR22's and Mark III 22/45's. Nothing but problems with them right out of the box. Ammo picky and jam-o-matics. Only metal frames, aluminum or steel for me thanks. At the range where I shoot you can get a 10 for $10 deal, (10 rounds in a rental gun for $10). I've tried many rental plastic pistols by different makers in 9 MM, .40 and .45. Some seem OK, others are way too light for the caliber. I wouldn't want to be the guy shooting them when they are 40 or more years old, like all my pistols that I shoot on a monthly basis. I do not believe they will hold-up and still be safe after many years of firing...we'll see.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Plastic guns almost seem disposable, IMO, and in 50 years I don't think many people are going to want Glocks made in 2015, however many people want old Colt and Browning steel frame pistols made 50+ years ago.

I'm a little biased, I started out in the shooting hobby collecting and shooting rifles that were in many cases over 100 years old, and they worked fine. As much as I have tried to like plastic guns, the closest I have come is AR-15's, with their alloy receivers and plastic stocks. Also just bought a Glock 42 .380 PURELY as a summer carry tool, and nothing else, because I needed something I can carry wearing light clothes that still offers some kind of punch. I thought of it the same as buying a hammer or a staple gun, just needed a tool for a job. I just always preferred a metal revolver or pistol.

There's no hiding it, polymer frame autos are purely designed to make lighter guns that cost less to make, and gun makers can sell a zillion of them for $500 a pop. When they break or wear out, you're supposed to just buy more, not fix the old ones. PD"s trade in their Glocks every 5-7 years, they are just tools that get switched out. They seem to hold up just fine, there's nothing wrong with them, but they are just one more step toward a "throwaway economy", we have throwaway cars, throwaway electronics, throwaway guns.........I can't recall the last time someone fixed a 10 year old LCD TV, just throw it away and get a new one.
 

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Congratulations on your newly purchased Ruger pistol. Sounds like you have good plans on adding some siblings for it.:)
 

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ExArmy11b, As noted by other members, you got a Standard, not a MK I .... and there's no such thing as a "pre-Mark I". That said, you got a classic pistol that is famous for being accurate and functional.

Because your are new to Marks, I'd like to give you some safety advise. The original Standards and MK I's have a couple potential safety problems .... one is .... the thumb safety locks the bolt either forward or fully to the rear. When you operate the bolt to charge a round from a fresh magazine, there's no way to put the safety in the SAFE position. The natural tendency is to put your finger inside the trigger guard because that's where it "feels right". This can be a combination for disaster because when the bolt slams home, your finger may accidentally pull the trigger. Ruger was sued many times for this issue so they finally came up with the MK II. It has a bolt lock back feature where the safety can be placed in the SAFE position before charging the chamber. The second issue is with the magazine release, which is located on the heel of the grip frame. To load or remove a magazine, it is nearly impossible to keep the muzzle pointed in a safe direction. This safety issue was fixed in the MK III when they located the magazine release behind the trigger ... like a 1911.

Based on these two issues, I would highly recommend forcing yourself to keep your trigger finger OUTSIDE the trigger guard when charging ... something that is not easy to remember, especially for wheel gun guys. Second, be very conscious around other people when loading or unloading. Nothing makes your friends more nervous than to have a gun pointed at them!

Enjoy your Standard ... great guns ... well worth owning!
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
This will purely be a range gun- plinker, I'll probably never use the safety.

The heel mag release is kinda "hinky" , but this isn't a gun I'll need to reload with any kind of speed.

I was hoping Wolff made recoil and mag springs for the Mark 1- standard series, since the recoil spring in this gun is 50+ years old.
 

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The recoil spring assembly is the same for the Standard/Mk I/Mk II (and probably Mk III, but I don't have access to one to compare), so they are easy to find.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Awesome, I might need the springs, I ran 18 rounds of American Eagle Red Box through the gun today, did a nice job peppering a milk jug at 10 yards, had two "bobbles", a misfeed and a stovepipe.....

Otherwise the gun is a blast to shoot, I can afford to shoot a lot more with .22's, given that now I have a new 10/22, a .22 SP101 and now this Standard Model.

I don't know if it's a bad mag, weak mag springs and/or weak recoil springs. Can't say I fault the gun, those springs have been under tension in the gun since before Vietnam:) I don't have a new one to compare to, but the slide feels "weak" when you pull it back.

I'll have to get it out and shoot it more, it's already pretty well oiled, I need to put a few 100 through it and then thoroughly clean it.

The neat part of this gun is the lack of a real "slide", just the internal bolt that cycles, so it feel really solid when you shoot it.
 

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I have a MK I Standard and a MK I Target and both do prefer Federal, CCI, and Winchester high velocity ammo. Will not work well with the Thunderbolt.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Hope you guys had a good Thanksgiving, and thanks for the info:)

The reviews on MidWay say that the Mec-Gar Mk. II mags will fit in the Mk.I series guns without alterations, and some of the info I read was that the older Mk.I mags can be a little spotty for function. MidWay also has Mk.I-II-III mainspring assemblies, might as well drop one of those in.

On the plus side all of the rounds went bang, so I think my hammer spring is OK.

The YouTube videos make it seem like it's a pain to field strip these but I guess I'll have to learn at some point:)
 

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Hope you guys had a good Thanksgiving, and thanks for the info:)

The reviews on MidWay say that the Mec-Gar Mk. II mags will fit in the Mk.I series guns without alterations, and some of the info I read was that the older Mk.I mags can be a little spotty for function. MidWay also has Mk.I-II-III mainspring assemblies, might as well drop one of those in.

On the plus side all of the rounds went bang, so I think my hammer spring is OK.

The YouTube videos make it seem like it's a pain to field strip these but I guess I'll have to learn at some point:)

The first time or two, it will be a pain to disassemble. After that, it gets fairly easy (I will admit that I never take the receiver off of the frame). A paperclip is a good tool to hook the mainspring latch.
 
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