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Discussion Starter #1
I was wondering how to remove the fireing pin from my P89DC. I've not been able to figgure it out. I want to replace the spring & I'm not haveing very god luck. I sure as heck dont want to scratch or bend anyting. I am hopeing maby Iowegan or one of you other experts could me out. I have always though that if somebody could put something together, then surley I could at least tear it apart. I must be wrong in this case!
Thanks
Sam
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Well JB. Thanks for the information. I did look at the diagram on the Ruger web site. I just can't get the de-cock lever out of the right side of the slide. I'm sure if I could do that, or move it just enough then the pin would come right out. I'll keep messin' with the thing and maby I'll figgure it out.
 

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I looked at the IPB, and it looks similar to my P95DPR. Here's how I removed mine:
  • Remove the extractor, http://www.rugerforum.net/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=220
  • Remove the right decock lever, it just falls out
  • Remove the decock spring retainer pin, tricky, but it can be done. You have to hold the decock spring down with a screwdriver and pry the pin out at the same time using another screw driver, from the inside of the slide
  • Remove the decock spring
  • Push the firing pin into the slide from the hammer end
  • While holding the firing pin in the slide, remove the left decock lever
  • Remove the firing ping from the slide
Re-Assemble in reverse order. I hope this helps.
 

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I guess my question would be: Why are you replacing the firing pin spring? You don't want a lighter one because it could create slam fires. A heavier one might result in light primer hits. That leaves a defective spring the only reason for replacement. Ruger P-guns are designed to operate well with a host of different loads. With exception of the mainspring (hammer spring) being a bit too strong, all the other springs in the gun are the right tension for best overall function.

Enlighten me????
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Hey You Guy's! Thanks for the advice. Actually, I'm just experimenting with the springs. I understand what you mean about light & heavy springs,Iowegan. The one with the Wolf kit happens to be heavier than the stock spring. I just decided I would try it to see for myself what would happen. I got the left side de-cock lever with out any problem, but I couldnt get the right side one off. It seems that the fireing pin has turned 1/4 turn & may be holding the lever somehow. But I haven't got the extractor out yet either. With these instuctions & a prayer I can probably do it ok. Anyway, wether I change the spring or not, I want to be able to remove the fireing pin whenever I feel the need to. This pistol & I took a swim in the Arkansas River earlier this year and I noticed that a few very small grains of sand were still deep inside the gun even though I have cleaned it many times since then. Anyway, I'll get the thing apart & put back together & try it out. I looked for that link last night, RNettles & couldn't find it or anything like it. I must not have done it right. Thank's for posting it. It's people like all of you that makes this such a great forum. With guys like you to help us technicaly handicaped shooters, The world will be a better place!
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Got it! Nothing to it!(ha!) I left the stock fireing pin spring in & put the 20# recoil spring in along with the lighter hammer spring. I won't have a chance to try the gun out untill this weekend. Now, if I could just shorten the trigger pull somehow................
 

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kansas45, Lets hope your end results turn out OK. Just from my personal experience, I've found Ruger P-gun springs to be the best compromise for overall function. When you trade springs, you may end up trading one problem for another.

Recoil springs are selected based on engineering data. They need to apply the right amount of tension for both feeding and extraction while maintaining enough tension to keep the barrel locked into the slide. Slide and frame battering are also a big issue because it can affect the gun's life expectancy.

Here's what happens when you install a lighter recoil spring: The slide will get the hell beat out of it when it is blown back. Cases will zoom out and land a long ways away. This can be overcome by loading much lighter charges than normal factory ammo.

Here's what happens with heavier recoil springs: The slide and frame get battered when the slide returns to battery. This will cause undue wear to the barrel lug and frame. Cartridges can get distorted from being slammed into the chamber. The barrel / slide lock will hold the gun in battery for a bit longer. This can cause extraction problems and beats the lock lugs up. The slide is harder to operate when loading or unloading. About the only thing you gain is the brass doesn't fly as far. Personally, I don't think this minor inconvenience is worth beating up your gun.

One of the very best designed recoil spring setups on the market is in Ruger's P-345. They use a lighter recoil spring to prevent frame battering in battery and a "helper" spring to prevent battering when the slide is all the way back. The helper spring doesn't do much for slide return but it sure does cushion the slide on recoil. Here's a photo of "The Best" recoil spring system on the market.

 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks Iowegan. I learn from people like you. I'm just doing a few things to better learn how my P89 works. I don't know why, but this my favorite pistol. I enjoy shooting it, & working on the thing is a good way for me to learn more about it. If I don't like what I've done with the springs, I'll know in a few rounds & I'll just change things back the way they were. I have been able to smooth the trigger action by polishing the parts that touch or interact with each other. I've polished the trigger parts of the P345, P90 & P95 and have had good luck with lowering the trigger pull & making the pistols run smoother. I've done some work on my 1911's & my XD45 Tactical as well. I'm not one to just set around & watch T.V. in the evenings, so if the GF & I don't have anything going, I hang out in my gun room & take one of them apart & clean it or re-load some ammo or something to keep busy with. This is a pretty interesting hobby!;)
 

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kansas45, I do the very same thing every time I run across a gun I haven't worked on before. It's a great education to see first hand how things work. Please don't be offended by my previous post. I'm not trying to discourage you, just want you and other readers to know swapping parts can create more problems than they solve.

I'm an old 1911 guy. Been playing with these things for more than 40 years. Now here's a platform where changing springs and other parts can really optimize a 1911 for its intended purpose. I have built a couple hundred of these things over the years for customers. Some want a carry gun, some want a bullseye gun, while others might want a tactical piece. Then there are some folks that want every accessory part under the sun. The good thing about 1911s is you can customize them for every application possible because of the after market support.

Ruger P-guns aren't that way. With exception of magazines, grips, and maybe sights, you pretty much have to stay with the factory design. This is not a bad feature, just the opposite because Ruger does such a fine job of designing their guns. There's always room for improvement by dressing the internal parts and smoothing things up but the basic design is so good that you really don't need to alter it. Think about this: with all thousands of P-guns in circulation, you would think after market companies would have a field day making accessory parts. The reason they don't is the factory design is so good, it's nearly impossible to make parts that improve the design. Personally, I don't see a problem "getting stuck" with a good design.
 
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