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Discussion Starter #1
I finally got my firearm's license here in Boston, and I am going to be purchasing an SR9 in the next couple of weeks. I have been searching for pistol safes for a while, but am having trouble finding out if certain ones are fireproof. I am specifically looking at the GunVault 1000 Mini. Does anybody know if this gun safe is fireproof or what the fire rating is?

Thanks!
 

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None are fireproof it is just some are more fire resistant than others. My experience is with standing gun safes and the quality is directly proportional with price however the pistol safes are different. There are some with fancy biometric (fingerprint recognition) opening systems that I don't trust and they are the most expensive. I would keep it simple with a button opening system and buy the one that looks most secure with the highest fire rating.
 

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For a single pistol, especially an easily replaced one, the fireproof safes are not cost effective. I would worry more about a thief carrying my safe off than it burning.

I have a gunvault with a 3 digit combo lock. I wouldn't trade it for a dozen biometric safes. The electronic safes can be broken into pretty easily.
 

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welcome to the forum. im from mass too good luck finding any guns right now if i was you id try the Marlborough gun show last day is tomorrow 1/26.
as far as a fire resistant safe i wouldn't bother id be more worried about someone getting in or walking away with it. if theres ever a fire your gun going to be ruined if exposed to any amount of heat for long and will rust almost instantly. i know from being in a house fire as a kid and seeing pics of the guns after. i actually have one of them that was given to me its a winchester 1300 i got it all checked out and was told it could be restored but the cost i could just go out and buy a new one. good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for the responses! I'm also wondering how I should store my ammo and if anybody has any suggestions for safes that are fire resistant for that purpose. Obviously I am new to all of this, but I just want to make sure that I am doing the right things. I have read many helpful posts on the forum, so I figured this would be a great place to start! There are a lot of rules up here in MA, and I just want to make sure that I am following all of them.
 

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I don't understand the concern for fireproof safes for one or two guns. Most of us own TVs worth $500 or $1000 in our homes. Also furinature, computers, etc. if I have a home fire, the loss of my hand gun is the least of my worries. Now, if you own a large collection and/or high value guns, then they should be in the best safe you can afford. All that being said, ALL firearms in a home should be secured. Even though my children are are grown and gone, grandchildren and neighbors and relatives with children are in my house. They're all under lock and key (the guns, not the kids).
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I am not concerned if the gun is lost in a fire, but I am concerned if the ammo is exposed to flames, then that becomes an issue for a lot of people. I live in an apartment building.
 

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I am not concerned if the gun is lost in a fire, but I am concerned if the ammo is exposed to flames, then that becomes an issue for a lot of people. I live in an apartment building.
I agree, ammo should be secured, but if your building has working fire alarms, hopefully everyone gets out. The risk of a fire setting of the natural gas supply is a much bigger hazard.
 

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I bought a SentrySafe for $139.00 at Menards(don't know if you have one nearby) but here is what it says in the manual:
Subjected to temperatures up to 1700 degrees for one hour. The safe interior will remain below 350 degrees. This enables your safe to withstand even high temperature exposure, as the hottest part of a fire moves through a building.
I have three semi auto's and two revolvers along with eight boxes of ammo in it. The lock has a barrel key and a programmable, numbered electronic lock and so far it has worked without any problems.
My only issues with it is that it's made in China(most are) and the plastic shelf is weak. I was surprised at how large the interior was when I opened it up for the first time. The empty safe weighs around 80#. I had to use a hand truck to bring it in the house.
Check it out. It might be what you're looking for.
 

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I am not concerned if the gun is lost in a fire, but I am concerned if the ammo is exposed to flames, then that becomes an issue for a lot of people. I live in an apartment building.
all ammo does in a fire is pop they dont go shooting around like people think there is no chamber for the projectile to build up pressure so it does very little.
i keep all my ammo in military ammo cans works good yet to have any issues
 

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Good video link scottl1346, I learned a few things, and I do like what Fort Knox has to offer in the smaller safe.
 

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FYI From the Champion Safe website:
Regardless of the confusing claims of "proprietary insulation," "Double-wall," "Triple-Wall," or "Quad-Wall," most home security safes use basically the same type of fire insulation: gypsum or sheetrock. Yes, the same stuff found in your home. Why is gypsum used over other materials? Because when gypsum is heated over 262°, it releases water vapor -- cooling the safe's interior. Until the moisture is baked out of the gypsum the interior of the safe will stay in the 200° to 300 ° range. This is why gypsum is the best fire insulation for safe applications.

I did not remember hearing any explanation of insulation used in fire resistant safes in this video - now you know.
 

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I've never understood the temperature ratings on safes, because of something my father said. He retired after 34 years as a professsional fireman.

He said all the safe ratings were BS, because a house fire can top 3000 degrees pretty easily. He has seen refrigerators melted into a giant blob on the floor, even free standing cast iron wood stoves twisted out of shape and partially melted.

The cheapo home safes are a plastic shell filled with concrete. The shell melts, and the concrete cracks into small chunks. He saw many of those. Pretty worthless.

The current vogue for large steel home safes hadn't happened then, so I doubt he ever ran across one at a fire scene.
 
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