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Discussion Starter #1
So I have roughly 400 rounds with not a single hiccup out of my Sr1911. I took it to the range to share some .45 ACP with my brothers when I had this happen. The brass ejected, but forced the next round to nose dive and jam.

I have seen dents in the brass before, but nothing like this. Thoughts on what caused it?

The ammo was American Eagle 230 FMJ straight from the factory box.


 

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Retired Moderator & Gunsmith
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rugerhouse, I've seen this same issue many times. What happened was ..you got a cartridge with a marginally low powder charge ... just enough to push the slide back but not enough for the case head to hit the ejector and kick it out of the port. So the spent case wasn't released and went forward with the slide and got munched in the port. Of course with the spent case held by the extractor, a fresh round wouldn't feed.

Bottom line ... weak cartridge .... nothing really wrong with your gun, except the factory recoil spring is a bit too stiff. If this continues, I would replace the factory 18 lb recoil spring with a standard 16 lb recoil spring. I did this with my SR 1911 so it would function properly with lighter loads. Use the factory 18 lb spring for 45 ACP +P loads.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
That was the opposite of what I was thinking so thank you very much Iowegan. And thanks for all your other posts.

The interesting thing is my brother has a SR1911 that was made in the first few months of release. Mine is a few months old. His slide is easy to cycle while mine is extra stiff.

I have never shot American Eagle in this one, but have shot a ton of WWB, a few others. It eats Hornady and Speer no problem.

I guess that Ruger changed to a stiffer spring along the way?
 

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rugerhouse, For openers, spring technology is not an exact science. Even high quality springs from Wolff can vary as much as +or- 10%. In my SR-1911, which is an early production gun bought new just 1 month after they were released, the recoil spring tested at 18.5 lbs. 16 lbs is standard for all full sized 1911s. 14 lbs is great for lighter target loads and 18 lb is intended for 45 ACP +P loads. Brownell's or Midway has standard 16 lb recoil springs for about $6 ... an excellent investment for reliability.

Different brands of ammo use different powders and even though they may end up with about the same muzzle velocity, thrust on the slide can be quite different. All it takes is a slightly light load to create cycling issues such as you experienced. In other words, a slightly heavy recoil spring coupled with a slightly light load spells "malfunction". By changing to a 16 lb spring, your SR 1911 should eat any factory load on the market, including Seller & Beloit, which seem to be the weakest.
 
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