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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am trying to decide which MC to get and was hoping for some thoughts. I want to get a MC for my outdoors gun to use while fishing, hiking, and hunting in CA. My field load is a standard 158 grain load with XTP HP's or SP's depending upon what I am up to. I know that the fixed sighted version is somewhat adjustable, but I am also an accuracy nut and like to be dead on. Those feelings lead me to the Adj sighted version. I just happened to have a Bowen Rough Country rear sight setting in the tool box. Those are about as indestructible as you can get. So I am kind of leaning towards the Adj version, but like the simple clean lines of the fixed sighted version. Any thoughts??

Thanks in advance for any help you can provide.

Matt




 

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I have owned both versions. The first I owned had fixed sights. I found it was sighted in for 7 yards with 357 magnum loads. It was not what I found to fit my needs. When the LGS had one come in with adjustable sights I worked out a swap by throwing in some cash.
For the life of me I don't know why any company would sell a weapon that shoots both 38 sol and 357 mag with fixed sights is beyond me.
The fully adjustable rear sight is much more practical. The sights can be adjustable for either caliber and different ranges.
 

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Righteous Dude
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Sounds like the adjustable sight model is what fits you. I like the look of the Novaks best, but function sometime overrules aesthetics.
 

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Get the adjustable sights. I found the Novak less than desirable on my Willey Clapp. While the were very visible, I couldn't get over the fact that the front sight pretty much covered my entire target at 7 yards and beyond. Now I do believe that is what those sights were intended to do, but if you are more of a target shooter I will say you will be dissatisfied with the fixed Novaks. Just my two cents.
 

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Ruger Tinkerer
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If I were choosing based on what you said I would go adjustable, especially since you already have a Bowen Rough Country rear on hand.
 

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I have the adjustable sight version of the MC and basically the same fixed sight setup on our 3" WC. I like them both, but I use the guns for different things.

The MC with its adjustable sights is more of do it it all kind of revolver for us, so adjustable sights make much more sense. However, I have heard that you can replace the Novak on the fixed sight version with an adjustable sight, but don't quote me on that.

The 3" WC with the Novak setup is going to see more duty as a carry gun for self-defense, mostly against bears and other 4 legged varmints. Those big, easy to see sights on the WC are perfect for that kind of job. For this gun, I'll probably settle on a load or two and call it good.

If you want to shoot a lot of different lands and ammo, it does make more sense to get the adjustable sight MC, especially if you're switching back and forth between 357s and 38s.
 

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I too have had a number of both fixed sighted guns as well as adjustable sighted ones. I've also had to rely upon said gun in the commision of my duties for my career. After noting the long term effects of carry of a duty weapon (or in your case, one that is packed about during fishing and hunting? trips) I'd have no problem deciding upon the fixed sight model and as you've already noted, the Novak's just plain look like they belong on that gun. Now as to quality?

Well you have the Novak sights that are from a company that has built it's reputation solely upon the reliability of it's sights and its sights alone. While on the other hand, you have a gun company that just happens to desire to place a set of adjustable sights on its guns. Ever notice that the adjustable sight "module" if it were so called, is the very same no matter which model of Ruger you are talking about? Sure they do have some differences, but the assembly for the most part is identical from model to model. You know that the mill cut in the frames are indeed identical so that tells you something about the sight assembly. Now you have an assembly that is made of aluminum (not solid steel like the Rough Country sights from Bowen) and the only thing keeping your sights aligned is two little "ballpoint pen" springs for elevation and only one such spring for windage. Bowen in their all steel design, has steel screw against steel screw effectively locking in the adjustment. Novaks are also all steel however in a fixed configuration. Bowen sights are mentioned only to illustrate the comparison on how an adjustable sight should be made for a tough no nonsense firearm. The all steel Novak sights might indeed need physical adjustment, but that's just it, they are indeed adjustable to a degree.

Either deepen the rear notch or lower the front blade and elevation can be corrected (if necessary?) and a simple drift punch and a day at the range is all that is required to correct any windage problems. I've found that Novak equipped guns such as this are really the best of both world since you can "adjust" the sights for you particular needs and then it is there to stay. Not ever to be jostled out of alignment from rough handling or the unexplained difference in point of impact sometimes seen with an adjustable sight. My duty weapon during qualifications one year started out printing Extremely LOW. I immediately called the range master and armorer over to my lane (since only the armorer was allowed to "adjust" ones sights), figuring that if only one person was sighting in the guns, then they'd all be about the same and spot on and switchable between officers. They took a look and what had happened was that some debris got into the sight assembly and during holstering the rear sight got pushed down. Well the debris kept the ballpoint spring from pushing the assembly back up and into alignment so I was shooting with a rear sight that was all the way on the bottom of its adjustment range. Not a good thing and a darn good thing it was caught at the range. Just imagine if that gun had to be used in the commission of my duties? Heaven help me, the department, and everyone else in line of the ensuing lawsuits.

Go for the sure thing and adjust the "fixed" Novaks to your personal needs and then it will be there to stay. Speaking from experience, Smithy.
 

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I'd go with the adjustable version, simply more versatile in going with a chosen load.

I have the Bowen rear on a half-lugged GP, quite happy with it.
Denis
 

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Got the hots for the MC when they first hit the market and bought the Novak model. Great gun shoot nice groups, quickly. Obviously set up for quick shots at combat distances, a great SD and IDPA gun.

But I wanted the ability to dial in different loads so I traded for a Adj. Sights model and I love this gun, even more than the Novak model. I would love it if someone would make a plain black patridge style blade for the front.

I sold my S&W 686 SSR after the Adj Sighted MC went to the range with me.
 

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Sounds like the adjustable sight model is what fits you. I like the look of the Novaks best, but function sometime overrules aesthetics.
I agree 100% for adjustable sights, but the Novak looks sharp. My GP100 has the Williams Firesights & I love them.


Your quote made me immediately think of my Hi-Point 995. Not a pretty firearm, but shoots every time, all the time.
 

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I just got the MC with adjustable sights but I did check out the Novak sited one and I liked the sight picture on that model too but I wanted adjustability for different loads. I think if you are drawing from concealed holster a lot, the Novak is good, not a lot to snag. In a IDPA SSR revolver, that may be a reason to go for the fixed sights but I can't think of a lot of other reasons to get it over the adjustable.

Like Hunter49 I find the front fiber to be huge on this gun. It's great for fast acquisition of the target but obscures smaller targets over 7 yards so I may end up changing the front out to a smaller fiber or maybe a gold dot or tritium. I just got it though so I am going to put a few hundred rounds through it before making that decision.

JMHO
-Jim
 

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I'd go with the adjustable version, simply more versatile in going with a chosen load.
That's the point that I don't understand. I work up a load and that becomes my "pet load?", my "only load", my "stock up and fill the ammo cans load". You see, once I've got a good load, I start loading that load and seldom find any reason whatsoever to change the "good load" to one of lesser quality? Makes sense doesn't it? So now I have that load and even go so far as to purchase a specific load cylinder for my Lil Dandy powder measure so that only that load can be produced. With only one load for a given caliber, then it stands to reason that there will only be one Point of Impact for that very same load. With one point of impact, then for a given yardage chosen to sight in at, a more permanent alteration or adjustment of ones fixed sights can be done so that your gun's sights will never be off. Much safer to have a fixed sight on a fixed yardage with a fixed load, then to have an adjustable sight that can get bumped at the slightest movement or rough handling or hunting conditions afield. Smithy.,
 

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Buy the adjustable sighted GP100 MC, but wow so expensive if you dig the looks of the MC!!:confused: But you could literally save several hundreds of dollars just buy a standard Ruger GP100 stainless steel 4 inch adjustable sighted revolver! The standard GP100 can have a action job & smoothed up & still save money!!':rolleyes: Something to think about!!!
 

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Buy the adjustable sighted GP100 MC, but wow so expensive if you dig the looks of the MC!!:confused: But you could literally save several hundreds of dollars just buy a standard Ruger GP100 stainless steel 4 inch adjustable sighted revolver! The standard GP100 can have a action job & smoothed up & still save money!!':rolleyes: Something to think about!!!
I looked at both and the MC was only about $100 more then the regular gp100 4". The grips and better trigger were worth that to me. The grips alone are an $90 upgrade from Ruger so most of the difference is made up right there.

Ruger® GP100® Match Champion Grips-ShopRuger

JMHO
-Jim
 

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If you want a GP100 to shoot little groups on paper, then get a 4" or even better a 6", with standard sights.

The Match Champion and Wiley Clapp have the Novak sights made for quick acquisition and "combat" type shooting, not 25 yard slow fire Bullseye.

IMO the Match Champion was designed to "update" the GP100 to appeal to the tactical fans and the 1911 shooters, who want the Novak sights.

Luckily both options exist, I personally say go for what suits your needs the best.

If you like the look of the MC, but want target sights, get the adjustable and I'm sure some kind of aftermarket front sight can be found or made, that has a finer blade.
 

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Buy the adjustable sighted GP100 MC, but wow so expensive if you dig the looks of the MC!!:confused: But you could literally save several hundreds of dollars just buy a standard Ruger GP100 stainless steel 4 inch adjustable sighted revolver! The standard GP100 can have a action job & smoothed up & still save money!!':rolleyes: Something to think about!!!
Very true, very true, but.................. There is one thing that you simply cannot do. Even if you'd think you could approach it starting with a fixed sighted GP100. You simply cannot build you up a Wiley Clapp revolver by purchasing a standard either fixed or adjustable sight, GP100 and then acquiring the necessary component parts and take it all to your local smith for a WC dovetail to be milled into the top strap. (I know because I checked) The reason I checked such a weird path of firearms modification is that at the time and at present I believe, Californians were simply NOT allowed to buy a Wiley Clapp revolver since it was not located or thought even mentioned on the California Safety Roster. So the short barreled standard GP's are indeed on the list and I figured that I could find the right base model and then pay good sums of money for the work to be done and bingo bango, I'd be the only Californian with a Wiley Clapp Legally that is.

A quick check with Ruger produced necessary part numbers for all of the various sight and grip differences and the worker could tell that I simply was not just looking for spare parts, but trying to construct something. He asked what I was up too and I told him with the reason why (CA and all). I then received the bad news and that the Wiley Clapp base frame has a much thicker top strap than any other model. It had to have that overkill of a top strap to allow a big chunk of it to be milled away in order to slide in the rear Novak sight. A metal thickness that the other "standard" models did not even come close to providing. No special orders with no sights and big top strap was even considered since it would constitute a "different" model in CA's eyes and also be subject to the Safety List's requirements for sale within the state. Bummer and a half. I wish you all the best in your up coming decision, but again if it were me I'd always opt for the special. The not everyone has one of these puppies type of gun and that can only be found in the Wiley Clapp model. Smithy.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Thanks for all the help guys and gals. I am going to a store that has both in stock and then I guess I will make up my mind. I am leaning toward the Adj version with the hope that one day the WC 3" becomes available in CA.

I realize I could just throw the Bowen sights on a regular GP and save some bucks, but I really love the 1/2 lug and this will be a BDay present to myself.

I will let you all know what I get.
 
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