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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My first time transporting my lc9 while flying:

I've read both the TSA and the airline rules, this is what I think it is:
Unloaded, slide back (or disassembled), magazine empty, rounds in the box they came in (secured so the primers don't touch). Hard-sided case w/lock (owner can be the only one with the key). Placed inside the suitcase, on top. Open the gun case while at the ticket counter for inspection (I read that somewhere, the opening of the case while at the ticket counter).



Here's what happened, going: Walked to the ticket counter and said "I need a weapons declaration form." Short form. I filled it out, handed it back. The agent asked if the gun was loaded. I said "no." She took the form (≈ 3x5), taped it to the box. Took the suitcase, that was it.

Return flight: "I need a weapons declaration form." The agent asked "you have a weapon?" "Yes." I filled out the form. Agent taped it to the box and said "wait here for an escort." Two airport people showed up, took me behind the counter to a small room. "Lay your suitcase on the table, please" they said. I waited for a TSA agent, who arrived ≈ 5 minutes later. The TSA agent was very friendly (Texas, of course). He asked some routine questions, kind of probing me to see if I was a bad guy. He then took some kind of wand from a locked cabinet, went around the inside of the suitcase. Docked it in a holder of some kind. Remove the wand from the dock and went around the gun case. End of inspection.

Two very different processes, the first was terribly wrong. I commented to an escort in the return flight " None of this happened on the first flight." She said "airlines to it differently." WHOA!!!!!! There aren't different rules!

I won't name the airlines, city or carrier. I think they are supposed to have me open the gun case for inspection: no one did. WHOAAAAAAAAA!!
 

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The little room is a good idea. A couple years ago I was in the counter line at Seattle to check my bag. The ticket agent must have asked the person to open thier gun case, this was a long gun case.

The lady checking in at the counter next to him just started screaming GUN, GUN, GUN at the top of her lungs. She started to turn red she was screaming so loud.

After massive commotion and about 25 police decended on us the guy puts his locks on the case and went on his way. The lady was so worked up the Paramedics hauled her off. The Northwest ticket agents were calm through the whole thing, which I think is the only reason she did' incite a panic. My guess is she was from New York and had never seen a gun before.:rolleyes:
 

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Unbelievable!!!!! I've always wondered how the situation works.
We headed to North Carolina 3 weeks ago & were staying way up in the hill/mtns & there was national forest adjacent to the cabin we were. I thought about bringing something just in case we were surprised by a "large creature" while wandering thru the woods, but then thought it may be more hassle to get thru TSA or airport check in.
 

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https://www.tsa.gov/travel/transporting-firearms-and-ammunition

You are confusing TSA regulations with the practices of individual airlines. The TSA regs are really pretty simple (basic guidelines linked above). The airlines can choose to implement procedures above and beyond what the TSA requires, moreover different airports will also handle things differently depending on the resources of the local TSA operations. Your experience is very typical - different airlines and different airports may do things a little differently. Big deal.

When I have flown with a handgun I was never asked to open the locked case for any inspection. What purpose would that serve? "Yup. It's a gun." The case is locked, it's inside your suitcase and you don't have access to it from that point until you pick up your suitcase at baggage claim on the other end. Why would you want to have to open your locked hard case?

Some airlines have simply decided not to allow any firearms at all and eliminate the extra steps in the check-in process. Your experience sounds typical. Why would want it to be any more difficult?
 

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So you're complaining that the process was easier than expected? I think having to declare a firearm in your checked luggage is an invasion of your privacy. BUT if you must, the only thing you should be required to do IMO is declare you have a firearm, then present your CCW and they should say, 'have a good day'

I think CCWs should be able to conceal on an airplane. or anywhere they want for that matter.

Here in the purple state of texas, Police officers are more likely to be charged in a crime than CHL holders.
 

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Years ago I was flying home and the ticket agent put a tag on the outside of my luggage that stated firearm on it. I did not know any better. When I went to find my suitcase on the other end I could not find it at all. Finally I went to a lost baggage office to ask. It turns out they had removed my bag because they did not want it going around the carousel with the firearm label on it. They confirmed I was the owner and told me the agent was not supposed to label the suitcase. I glad someone had the sense to not put it out. I just wish they would have made a announcement about my bag being held instead of me wondering were it was.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
transporting weapons while flying

The following statement copied directly from the airline website:[/B][/I]

TSA Security Screeners must visibly ensure that the cylinder is completely empty and that there are no prohibited items inside.

That's from the airline, not me. The TSA site does say you must check with the individual airline, follow their specific rules, if any.

I think they should check. It just makes sense that the rules are followed. They say "gun must be unloaded", there's only one way to do that.

It was an easy experience, and I'm not complaining. Just sharing my first experience.
 

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..........

Two very different processes, the first was terribly wrong. I commented to an escort in the return flight " None of this happened on the first flight." She said "airlines to it differently." WHOA!!!!!! There aren't different rules!

I won't name the airlines, city or carrier. I think they are supposed to have me open the gun case for inspection: no one did. WHOAAAAAAAAA!!
In your OP you said "the first was terribly wrong" and then you added the "WHOA!!!!! There aren't different rules!" and "I think they are supposed to have me open the gun case for inspections: no one did. WHOAAAAAAAA!!"

Pretty dramatic. And based on incorrect pre-conceived ideas.

Turns out there ARE different rules at different airlines. When you run an airline you can add the visual inspection rule at your airline.

Frankly a loaded gun poses no real risk if it's locked up in a hard case, inside a suitcase, stowed in the belly of an airplane. If you believe a loaded gun is going to "go off" by itself then I suppose carrying a holstered gun is pretty dangerous too. But the TSA rules say unloaded so unloaded it must be. Note the TSA rules also allow your ammo to be stored inside the locked case too so it's not like they believe guns and ammo traveling together in the same container poses any security threat. Not advocating flouting the TSA rules against loaded firearms just pointing out the rule doesn't add any practical factor of safety to the scenario. It simply seems like a good idea so that's how we do it. Obviously the TSA and the airlines see little value in making people open their case to check and see that the gun is unloaded. As gun owners and firearms enthusiasts why would we?
 
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