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Mt Washington at just 6,000 ft is a weather anomaly. Up until a couple years ago when the Aussies were able to measure the wind speed in a tornado Mt Washington had the highest recorded wind at 231 MPH. This is the weather up there this weekend, notice the wind speed. They had a 7-mile race scheduled to climb to the top yesterday and it was shortened due to weather.

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Mt Washington at just 6,000 ft is a weather anomaly. Up until a couple years ago when the Aussies were able to measure the wind speed in a tornado Mt Washington had the highest recorded wind at 231 MPH. This is the weather up there this weekend, notice the wind speed. They had a 7-mile race scheduled to climb to the top yesterday and it was shortened due to weather.

View attachment 171367
Often not mentioned is that while 231 was the highest recorded wind speed on Mount Washington, the anemometer broke at that point so there could very well have been a higher speed at the time.

... and yes, with 51 for last night's low and not yet up to 60, I would not mind a few extra degrees right now. Of course I will be complaining when we get the next heat wave so ...

Bruce
 

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Supposed to get into the low 60s here outside of Portland, OR with continued rain, showers, drizzle and sprinkles. “Sun breaks“ are predicted for tomorrow (that’s when there are short openings in the clouds that let the sun shine through for a few minutes).
 

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Here in my neck of Penn's Woods it was 80 on Friday, perfect summer day.

Saturday it was 50, very windy, and overcast. Typical fall day...in mid-June.

Today, crystal clear blue sky, breezy, and low 60's.

Hey, at least it didn't snow! :cool:
 

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Heat index in Tampa FL 103 degrees


Thewelshm
 

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No heat wave in southern Louisiana, today is 97 and sunny. In other words, normal for June, July, August, and sometimes September.
I was down in your neck of the woods this morning, picked up a friends RV in Denham Springs and brought it home for them. Here in NE Louisiana it’s supposed to be 69 tonight with a north wind. It’s pretty nice out. Heat will be going back up tomorrow.
 

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My daughter took my wife and I out for a tasty Mexican lunch. When we got home, the house was hot. It was 94 deg outside and 85 deg inside. Seems the compressor on the AC took a crap and none of the local AC services were available on this Sunday Juneteenth holiday. We are holed up in the basement where it is 75 deg .... bearable but not as cool as we like. Here's hoping the AC repairman gets here tomorrow morning. I just got my Buick AC repaired last week. The GM dealer soaked me $1800+ for a new condenser, labor, and coolant.
 
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I am just southwest of Mobile we hit 102 yesterday. Our old a/c never cycled off during the day- temp inside topped out at 81.5. Set point was 78.
Only got to 93 today, but are expecting 103 for W-T-F. Heat index will be around 112? Hope the weatherman is wrong.

Like @Iowegan said above- if the a/c craps out...there will be trouble. My a/c is 17 years old. I priced a new one last summer and got a range of 8-10k$. That hurts to even think about. May have to consider a few window units- til I can hit the lotto or something?
 

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My daughter took my wife and I out for a tasty Mexican lunch. When we got home, the house was hot. It was 94 deg outside and 85 deg inside. Seems the compressor on the AC took a crap and none of the local AC services were available on this Sunday Juneteenth holiday. We are holed up in the basement where it is 75 deg .... bearable but not as cool as we like. Here's hoping the AC repairman gets here tomorrow morning. I just got my Buick AC repaired last week. The GM dealer soaked me $1800+ for a new condenser, labor, and coolant.
I don't know if there are any medical conditions, but in recent years, the A/C repair folks put us at the top of the list as my late wife was a heart patient. Just a consideration.
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OTHERS: I was stationed in the Azores (Lajes) for 15 months. Each February, "the winds" came. I spent two Februaries there. My quarters (Bachelor Officers' Quarters - BOQ) was one of three remaining from the previous Feb. Fortunately my quarters were on the "leeward" side both years, but the Venetian Blinds still bounced about, even thought the windows were sealed/painted shut. All that remained of the building just up hill was a foundation/concrete slab when I arrived.

As an Army logistician, one of my many jobs was tracking of shipments to the island. One of the key "items of interest" from the supported community (USAF, USN, USA) was a replacement anemometer for the Air Base control tower. Its last recorded sustained reading (before it blew away) was 152 knots (175 MPH). That control tower was close to my BOQ. Evacuations of the tower were frequent.

Discussing this with the USAF Air Base Group commander, this was a recurring loss and the USAF was griping about why there was an "increased" consumption of anemometers at that location as compared to other bases.

My first "February" occurred as we Army guys were being "inspected" by a bi-annual IG from our higher HQs in Bayonne. Their flight here was very bad and had to wait (while being kept inside the 727 charter/channel aircraft in St. John's, Newfoundland) for about 12 hours awaiting a 4-hour projected "clear weather" report from the Azores.

To make things more sublime, their flight from St. John's to the Azores was "bumpy" the entire way, with much barfing aboard. When their flight finally "planted" (almost sideways) in the Azores, I was out to greet the team along with some transport. The plan was to give the team a bit of time to freshen up and have brunch at the Officer's Club, then begin overviews of our operations, etc. The team was so exhausted (and miserable) that the head of the team said they were not up to anything except getting to their rooms, showering, and getting some rest: perhaps "tomorrow morning".

Each room they stayed in had the local AFN TV, and often had warnings as the winds came through: "current winds are 120 KTs, with expected gusts to 150 KTs - take standard precautions - Army Tugboat Crews are to report to the port for emergency preparations".

The next morning, we picked them up, gave them a quick tour of the Air Base, then went down to the port. Winds were still 120 KTs and the seas in the port were about 30'. Our Tug crews were still getting ready to pull their tugs away from the quay in the event the lines gave way. They had been there all night. After a brief overview of our mission and personnel and our gripes, we brought the team out for a walk-through of the tugs. Winds were still in the 120 KT range. We made it to the last (third) tug lashed up using life-lines and jumping from tugs #1 and #2. Several of the team lost hats and a few emptied out their breakfast. It was GREAT! They most certainly got an appreciation of the conditions under which we operated.

The Supply member of the team was escorted to our warehouse to inspect supply records. When asked to review them, they were all USAF records - as the USAF supplied us with everything. He finally just gave up when it was explained all the parts there were USAF property, paid for by the USAF, and that the USAF IG folks a few months earlier gave us a clean bill of health.

Next was a visit to each of our "customers: the USAF Air Base Group and the USN ½ squadron of P3 sub hunters. All preached great praise on our operations and customer support. As was typical, all of us units did the same for each other as we had an island mentality where we stood together "against" outsiders.

When there was a two-hour window from the winds for departure, the team left quickly, for another trip (through St. Johns) to home. It was a trip they would never forget. To be fair, all of our gripes (Sea-Pay credit for our tug crews, dangers of using 1952-vintage six-cylinder direct-drive engines with Harbor/Inland Waterways tugs operating in the North Atlantic, etc.) were recorded. Try as they might have intended, we got glowing reports mostly and the adverse comments were directed toward our higher HQs for lack of support.

The winds resumed and life and missions resumed (although with 30' seas inside the harbor there was no docking/un-docking/loading/unloading of supply ships). One learned very quickly to face into the winds when opening a car's door...My BOQ survived both Februaries, as did my car. It was an experience I will never forget - or regret - but once was enough...Army mariners are a different bunch.

Sorry for the diatribe as it went somewhat off-topic, but wanted to share and this brought back memories I wanted to share.
 

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Every part of me except my arthritis loves cold weather. And I am an active old dude in better shape than all of my 60+ overweight, unhealthy friends, save one who surfs.

I love that picture of Mount Washington. I get along pretty well in cold weather but it gets a little harder every year. Conversely, heat waves, except from noon to 4 PM, get ever easier. I mowed a field the other day in 105 degree heat (index temp) and God help me, it felt okay. But I live outdoors, too ;)
 

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I don't know if there are any medical conditions, but in recent years, the A/C repair folks put us at the top of the list as my late wife was a heart patient. Just a consideration.
-----
OTHERS: I was stationed in the Azores (Lajes) for 15 months. Each February, "the winds" came. I spent two Februaries there. My quarters (Bachelor Officers' Quarters - BOQ) was one of three remaining from the previous Feb. Fortunately my quarters were on the "leeward" side both years, but the Venetian Blinds still bounced about, even thought the windows were sealed/painted shut. All that remained of the building just up hill was a foundation/concrete slab when I arrived.

As an Army logistician, one of my many jobs was tracking of shipments to the island. One of the key "items of interest" from the supported community (USAF, USN, USA) was a replacement anemometer for the Air Base control tower. Its last recorded sustained reading (before it blew away) was 152 knots (175 MPH). That control tower was close to my BOQ. Evacuations of the tower were frequent.

Discussing this with the USAF Air Base Group commander, this was a recurring loss and the USAF was griping about why there was an "increased" consumption of anemometers at that location as compared to other bases.

My first "February" occurred as we Army guys were being "inspected" by a bi-annual IG from our higher HQs in Bayonne. Their flight here was very bad and had to wait (while being kept inside the 727 charter/channel aircraft in St. John's, Newfoundland) for about 12 hours awaiting a 4-hour projected "clear weather" report from the Azores.

To make things more sublime, their flight from St. John's to the Azores was "bumpy" the entire way, with much barfing aboard. When their flight finally "planted" (almost sideways) in the Azores, I was out to greet the team along with some transport. The plan was to give the team a bit of time to freshen up and have brunch at the Officer's Club, then begin overviews of our operations, etc. The team was so exhausted (and miserable) that the head of the team said they were not up to anything except getting to their rooms, showering, and getting some rest: perhaps "tomorrow morning".

Each room they stayed in had the local AFN TV, and often had warnings as the winds came through: "current winds are 120 KTs, with expected gusts to 150 KTs - take standard precautions - Army Tugboat Crews are to report to the port for emergency preparations".

The next morning, we picked them up, gave them a quick tour of the Air Base, then went down to the port. Winds were still 120 KTs and the seas in the port were about 30'. Our Tug crews were still getting ready to pull their tugs away from the quay in the event the lines gave way. They had been there all night. After a brief overview of our mission and personnel and our gripes, we brought the team out for a walk-through of the tugs. Winds were still in the 120 KT range. We made it to the last (third) tug lashed up using life-lines and jumping from tugs #1 and #2. Several of the team lost hats and a few emptied out their breakfast. It was GREAT! They most certainly got an appreciation of the conditions under which we operated.

The Supply member of the team was escorted to our warehouse to inspect supply records. When asked to review them, they were all USAF records - as the USAF supplied us with everything. He finally just gave up when it was explained all the parts there were USAF property, paid for by the USAF, and that the USAF IG folks a few months earlier gave us a clean bill of health.

Next was a visit to each of our "customers: the USAF Air Base Group and the USN ½ squadron of P3 sub hunters. All preached great praise on our operations and customer support. As was typical, all of us units did the same for each other as we had an island mentality where we stood together "against" outsiders.

When there was a two-hour window from the winds for departure, the team left quickly, for another trip (through St. Johns) to home. It was a trip they would never forget. To be fair, all of our gripes (Sea-Pay credit for our tug crews, dangers of using 1952-vintage six-cylinder direct-drive engines with Harbor/Inland Waterways tugs operating in the North Atlantic, etc.) were recorded. Try as they might have intended, we got glowing reports mostly and the adverse comments were directed toward our higher HQs for lack of support.

The winds resumed and life and missions resumed (although with 30' seas inside the harbor there was no docking/un-docking/loading/unloading of supply ships). One learned very quickly to face into the winds when opening a car's door...My BOQ survived both Februaries, as did my car. It was an experience I will never forget - or regret - but once was enough...Army mariners are a different bunch.

Sorry for the diatribe as it went somewhat off-topic, but wanted to share and this brought back memories I wanted to share.
Thanks for sharing this.
 
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