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Discussion Starter #1
Waveform...
Sounds like papered 1981 Redhawk was purchased by an employee, and high polished in Newport NH prior to shipment to factory in Southport CT, where purchaser most likely was employed. Unlikely there would be any paperwork to certify factory high gloss. It sounds as though the gun was meant to be factory original, with the polishing done where the Redhawk was made----Newport.

As a note: the Redhawk barrel is a drop forging from outside. It is gun-drilled and broach rifled where the gun is made----Newport.

I'm guessing, but I would expect the gun went through assembly before it was test fired. Quite likely it was rapidly dry fired double action before going to the test range. Absence of a "drag ring," may indicate the gun was polished after test firing.

It is unliokely there would be anything special to this Redhawk, other than high polish. Ruger test fires all guns, so NIB means factory new, factory test fired. Each chamber has been tested with SAAMI Proof pressure ammunition 40%-50% overload. Proof loads are called "blue pills," as usually the case is dyed blue, so as not to be confused with commercial ammo.

Is the tab for the hammer pin on the left side of the frame?
David Bradshaw
 

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David, it looks like the photo in the Wilson book of serial #500-00001 - hammer pin tab is on the right side of the frame (the side that is stamped "Ruger REDHAWK".)

Just to be clear on your comment about the barrel - Redhawk barrel blanks were/are drop forged and procured from a vendor and are not from Pine Tree Castings? Is this unique to the Redhawk or standard practice on all Ruger firearms?

Thanks for the insight and information!

Wave
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Waveform... Correct, the Redhawk barrel is drop forged, same as Smith & Wesson barrels. S&W barrels, when I saw them being made, were hammer forged in the S&W foundry. The barrels machined, gun drilled, micro-honed, and broached----submerged. Micro-honing shows up as crosshatching on the lands.

The single hammer/trigger spring of the Redhawk was dropped in favor of separate mainspring and trigger rebound springs on the Super Redhawk.

The SRH costs less than the Redhawk to make, as the "grip spike" arrangement eliminates grip-frame polishing, while permitting greater latitude in grip design. Also, the SRH replaces the Redhawk forged barrel with a bar stock barrel. The first SRH barrels were Wilson broached. Later, as Ruger installed hammer forging machinery, the rifling was formed on a mandrel in the rotary-hammer process.

Remington, SAKO, Heckler & Koch, and others had been hammer forging barrels for years. Remington forged rifle barrels, but not shotgun barrels. Ruger started forging with their Red Label shotgun barrels. Now, Ruger forged barrels span rifles and handguns, including rimfires such as the highly accurate 77/22 VBZ .22 LR.

Accuracy still comes down to the individual barrel, how thoroughly each step is carried out.
David Bradshaw
 

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Thanks David. I always enjoy your insights and the experiences you share from your association with Ruger. Do you mind sharing what your role was at Ruger and the time frame of your involvement?

Thanks!

Wave
 

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I like the old style redhawk spring arrangement as I do virtually all my shooting on double action revolvers in double action mode only. In fact all my self defense revolvers have bobbed hammers and the single action notch removed.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Waveform... Tried answering by PM. However, thanks to my non-existent computer skill...

Was never an employee of Sturm, Ruger. Competitive marksmanship and the manner in which I tested guns got me invited by Bill Ruger, SR & JR, to the plant. Met Tom Ruger a number of times. Projects involved William SR and JR.

Just as in competitive shooting, I think it is better to share experience than to hoard it. Everyone who trains and coaches another shooter, and introduces new people to marksmanship, makes our Second Amendment stronger.
David Bradshaw
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Bwinters... I enjoy shooting a fine double action. In the days when I did fast draw with Blackhawks and Super Blackhawks, and with Smith & Wesson M-19's and M-29's, it was DRY FIRE and LIVE AMMO ONLY.

Never tried blank popping.

Even tried DA with a Model 29 on deer. It worked, although I consider it an affectation. There is plenty of time to cock a revolver on the draw when a aimed shot is to be made. Yesterday I gave myself one shot to hit a spaghetti pot at 50 yards with an S&W M-640 Centennial 5-shot .357 magnum. Loaded with Federal 357G 180 JHP. Bullet punctured both sides of the heavy gauge aluminum pot----double action.

However, when I step back to 200 yards with my Redhawk 5-1/2" .44 or Model 29 8-3/8" .44, I suffer no embarrassment in shooting single action.
David Bradshaw
 
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