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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am a little concerned about the cylinder movement on my GP100, It seems to more then it used to be, When I dry fire and keep the trigger pulled back I remember rocking the cylinder back n forth ,and it seemed pretty tight when new, It seems a little loose now , guns bout 15 years old , but it hasnt been shot that much.Any thoughts ? What I am concerned about , I get a lot of stuff blowing back when fired ,that hits my hands ,wondering if its slicing bullets ? GP 100 4 in 357
 

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some say to unload the gun- pull and hold the trigger- shine a light behind the cylinder- look into the barrel to see if all the chambers are aligning. I don't know what you are suppose to do after that
 

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I get a lot of stuff blowing back when fired ,that hits my hands ,wondering if its slicing bullets ? GP 100 4 in 357
Polaris, that sounds a lot more like a timing issue than a cylinder gap problem.

Can you check the clearance with a feeler gauge? And check both sides. Every once in a while a barrel will not sit squarely by a tiny bit, and that would make things worse.

I have three center fire Ruger revolvers, and I shoot mostly swaged and cast bullets. I never get anything flying back at my hands.
 

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Never had that with my GP-100 (knock on wood) I think I would either take to gun smith or send into Ruger for a complete check over..Hot lead does not feel good..

wPm
 

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Unloaded, to check cylinder movement, pull the hammer back all the way and hold the trigger back as far as it will go. Let the hammer down slowly while still holding the trigger back. then gently rotate the cylinder back and forth noting the amount of movement. It should'nt be too much but it will move a small amount. If excessive, a gunsmith (or Ruger) can fix.
While you have the trigger held back, try to move the cylinder fore and aft. It should not move any more than the tinyest amount (if you can feel any movement at all). Then check the B-C gap. Should be less than .008" +/-. If more then it's a trip to a gunsmith or Ruger.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Yup Larry 8 hit it dead on,that's my problem, when I first bought the pistol, 4 cylinders had no movement at all, 2 had a slight bit .Now all 6 have movement.Gun functions OK accuracy OK , just don't remember the flash of stuff towards my hands, That ,s my concern, cylinder rotating to much out of alignment with barrel, Upon inspection it seems most of the excessive movement is allowed by the gaps between the lower cylinder lock, and the lugs on the cylinder ,nothing looks worn? really cant see how it could be tightened up ? Had same movement on a security 6 replaced lower cylinder lock nothing changed .No one could say if its normal or not without seeing it im sure , ship it or not off to ruger Need opinions please.
 

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Well, Ruger will check it out and fix anything wrong. IF there is anything wrong. About the stuff hitting your hands, maybe your grip on the gun is in line with the B-C gap. If your fingers are forward of the trigger guard then they are too far to the front of the gun and the gasses that escape under high pressure from the B-C gap will impact your fingers. Happened to me when I first shot my SP101 - 357. So now I am careful to keep my fingers behind the B-C gap on all my revolvers. If your gun spits lead it will imbed that lead in your hand if your hand is alongside the B-C gap, so be careful. I'd check the B-C gap and only if it is over .010" would I send it off to Ruger. Under .010" Ruger will tell you it's within tolerances.
 

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Holding the trigger to the rear on a Ruger DA with the hammer down has no effect on cylinder lockup, travel, or fore & aft movement.
That's for Colts.

Holding the trigger to the rear, once the cylinder latch/bolt has engaged, tells you nothing that you can't determine with it forward at rest as far as lockup, headspace & timing go.
Denis
 

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I have always checked my guns and the guns that I was interested in buying by the method I stated in post #5.
There is a noticeable difference in the fore & aft movement and the rotational lockup when done that way compaired to with the trigger at rest. Try it, even with S&W and Colts you can detect less movement.
With the trigger held back the gun is in normal shooting mode, not at rest, therefore the measurements taken are more accurate.
 

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I have five GPs & two SPs. I have tried it.
There is zero difference in cylinder movement among any of them between the trigger fully back or fully forward.

I also have multiple Smiths. Trigger position has no importance in determining anything relative to the cylinder once the cylinder has locked up.

This comes up occasionally & people tend to perpetuate the myth.

The Ruger & Smith actions are constructed such that the trigger position makes no difference to endshake, headspacing, or rotational movement once the cylinder is locked in place.

The reason it does make a difference in the older V-Spring Colt DAs is that, by design, the hand bearing directly against the ratchet at the point of full rearward trigger positioning IS a critical part of timing & lockup.
In Smiths & Rugers, it is not.
Denis
 

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I just checked quite a few of my Smiths and Rugers and they all exibit the same results.
Maybe I'm doing it differently than you are.
I can understand technically your point about trigger. Maybe new guns are like yours as mine are from 20 to 80 years old.
 

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My oldest GP is '88. My newest is this this year.
My oldest Smith is '27. My newest is about 2002. I have worked with several newer Smiths.
I've checked four different Smith frame sizes of varying vintage.
I see no difference in any of them between trigger fully back and trigger fully forward.

The trigger really can't affect the little bit of rotational play in a locked cylinder, since the S&W hand & the Ruger hand are not putting enough pressure on the ratchet to make any appreciable difference in cylinder lockup.

Any contact between the rear of the cylinder & the tip of the hand in either brand is caused by light spring pressure against the hand, pushing it forward through the hand slot in the frame.
Once full rotation & cylinder lockup is attained, the hand has done its job & has no further function. It stays forward ONLY by spring pressure.

In the Colt V-Spring action, that hand/ratchet contact is caused by the trigger itself forcing the hand into a full-contact position and maintaining mechanical, not spring, pressure against the hand & in turn against the ratchet.
After full rotation & cylinder lockup via the cylinder stop has been been attained, the hand continues to perform the second part of its function, which is to firmly and MECHANICALLY lock the cylinder in place against ANY rotational wiggle.

In Smiths & Rugers, with the trigger fully back, the hand is held forward, but not mechanically locked. There is SOME minor spring pressure & contact between it & the ratchet, which can provide a minuscule amount of resistance to fore & after movement (end shake). But- the spring pressure on the hand is easily overcome by firmly (not just lightly) moving the cylinder back & forth along its rotational axis.
At the moment of ignition, the cylinder will certainly overcome that minor spring tension, the REAL BC gap will appear, and so on.

With the trigger forward, the hand retracts inside its slot, and places no pressure at all on the ratchet, since there's no contact.

When I check for end shake & BC gap I do it with the trigger forward, since there's not even minor spring pressure from the hand, and the degree of rearward travel will be the same as the degree of rearward travel under the immediate pressures of ignition.
That, to me, gives the better measurement.

In checking those on my guns with the trigger back, I make sure I put enough effort (which does not have to be excessive) into trying to move the cylinder so the relatively weak hand pressure doesn't affect anything.
Again, doing it that way shows no difference at all between those two trigger positions in any of my Rugers or Smiths.
The minor pressure from the hand just doesn't have enough steam to be a factor, whereas it's an entirely different matter with my older Colts.
Denis
 

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I tried both ways on my nearly new SP101 (357) and my new(ish) SRH and neither one has any noticeable difference between trigger back or forward. Maybe my older guns are a bit looser or worn although most of them are old but not shot much.
 
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