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Discussion Starter #1
At what point are you satisfied with your groupings on a target? And maybe you can give me tips after this post?


So my GP100 (3" fixed) is my main carry. Only a few hundred rounds through it but I practice as intended use (this is my EDC) so at 10-15ish yard range double action. I practice fast and slow bursts at single and multiple targets.


My groups are always within paper plate size (so I guess safely center mass) but man is it sweet to hit that bullseye every now and then. I actually practice much more with my Alaskan and my results are exactly the same even with the big difference in power. (but I have had that for far longer and well over 1000 rnds through it)


I see some posts here with these awesome 1-3" groups and I'm just wondering if that's possible with the way I practice? Or is that using a longer barrel and single action pulls when it feels good with the only goal is to hit the bulls eye? Cheers!
 

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For SD, group size isn't a big deal, you'd really want several magnum size holes in a bad guy rather than one ragged hole. Legend has it that .357 only needs one or two hits and you've done enough damage to stop the threat. Leave the mag dumping for the 9mm shooters. :cool:
 

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Personally, I use 4" x 6" note cards with a bulls eye or cross hairs drawn on them as my SD target, and try to get my shots on that card.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Personally, I use 4" x 6" note cards with a bulls eye or cross hairs drawn on them as my SD target, and try to get my shots on that card.

How are you practicing and with what GP/sight/barrel?


I see many people post these results and I'm so far off I think the way I practice is either very different - or I'm a very poor shot and need more guidance on how to aim/shoot.


Edit: I feel for my .44 bear carry my paper plate is OK but I would love to get my .357 groups better if possible. They are the same...
 

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For SD, group size isn't a big deal, you'd really want several magnum size holes in a bad guy rather than one ragged hole. Legend has it that .357 only needs one or two hits and you've done enough damage to stop the threat. Leave the mag dumping for the 9mm shooters. :cool:
Yeah, what he said! Three .357 magnum bullets in the same hole don't get you anything extra - unless you're shooting Bullseye.
 

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IME, sighting is not the issue, trigger control is.

Sure, you can practice to the point where you can keep all 6 in a 2-3" group with rapid DA fire, just takes some diligent practice.

front sight, smooth trigger work...
 

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I'm planning on a SD revolver. I love my GP100, but at 6", it's not really a carry gun for me. I'm thinking 3" GP or perhaps SP-101. Anyway, I plan to practice with that self defense gun doing only self defense shooting. Just like what you describe. I'll shoot my 6" as a target gun, slow and steady and I'll practice my shorty much faster double action only. I don't want to get in a pattern of shooting self defense gun slow and extremely carefully because if the need arises, time will be more critical than inches. I recall one self-defense instructor saying that if your group sizes are too small, then you are shooting too slowly. Shoot as fast as you can while still keeping all shots in center of mass.

I'm no self defense expert, but that makes good sense to me. But it's hard at the range not to want to make that group size as small as possible.
 

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Discussion Starter #11 (Edited)
What kind of precision can you attain when firing Single Action?
SA I grouped my 3" GP around 4-5 inches I think (10-15ish yards) but I have spent very little time practicing that - talking maybe 100 rnds max (if that) which is basically negligible.


My GP is fixed sight so when I really take my time I can adjust after the first shot (that can be way off) and then I can group around there but I tend to fire far too quickly after that and it feels like cheating because I don't think in a SD situation I would ever take the time to manually pull the hammer to improve my aim. I want to be able to adjust after the first shot and just go.


So I really never practice SA properly. Would practicing SA help me overall do you think?


EDIT: I also get the exact same results on my .44 SRH which I have well over 1000 rounds in (probably closer to 2k)
 

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Discussion Starter #12
IME, sighting is not the issue, trigger control is.

Sure, you can practice to the point where you can keep all 6 in a 2-3" group with rapid DA fire, just takes some diligent practice.

front sight, smooth trigger work...
"front sight" as in looking to replace the actual stock sight? Or the way I aim? Thanks.
 

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IHS:

I'm primarily doing this practice at 7 yards. I'm currently using a GP100, 4.2" barrel .357 magnum with Altamont grips and Remington Golden Saber .357 magnum rounds.

The usual practice I do is to shoot two shots as rapidly as possible with good sight picture on the 4" x 6" note card target, then drop the revolver muzzle down, then repeat until all six rounds are shot. I will go through this practice with 24 rounds (4 reloads).

After this, I use a full size target at 7 yards. I then aim for the bulls eye, then aim taking two shots with the front sight placed at the correct height, but with the left side of the front sight showing tight against the left side of the rear sight notch. I will then take two shots, this time with the right side of the front sight showing tight against the right side of the rear sight notch. I continue to do this with the front sight pointed as low as I dare, and as high as I dare. This gives me an approximate shot placement area based on the front sight being somewhat close in the rear sight, so I have an idea of where the gun will shoot with different sight pictures at 7 yards.

This is my standard warm up practice with any gun at the range.

I rarely do SD practice at any distances further than 7 yards, but the first exercise could be done at 15 yards or more.

If I want to test how accurate I am, I'll try to shoot out the hearts, diamonds, clubs, or spades out of a playing card at a certain distance. This works great, and the playing cards are cheap enough.

If you think you may be flinching while shooting, a good method to find out is to have someone else install an already spent shell in one or two random slots in the cylinder, and try to shoot bulls eyes. If you flinch, you will see it when you pull the trigger on a spent shell.

Hope this helps.
 

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"front sight" as in looking to replace the actual stock sight? Or the way I aim? Thanks.

Your sights are fine. Just concentrate on keeping the front sight in sharp focus, letting the rear sight and target be blurry, and a smooth trigger stroke that does not violently disturb your sight picture. Do that, and you'll hit well as fast as you care to shoot. Dry fire helps.
 

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Plus one on Marine 1
 
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