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GP100 Trigger drag with let-off:
IBOK read and re-read and enjoyed over and over. Using polish, fine grit 'wet dry' sandpaper, jeweling type file. I now have a mighty fine pull trigger. Thanks to the "Iowegan"

I actually ordered additional triggering parts; just in case I 'screwed up'

Now, I wouldn't trade, or consider replacing. Happy.
I do have an issue. Pull trigger to fire:) letting trigger off for re-set; not good.

Grinding, rough, dragging. Happens with slow to medium let off.

I did use the correct 'drill' bit for the trigger reset. Polished all edges and haven't found the problem.
?when? this issue is resolved; I'll have the finest handling shooting GP; all thanks to 'Gary'

Thanks in advance
 

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Read this post: http://www.rugerforum.net/showthread.php?t=7662 The only parts involved with trigger reset are the trigger itself, trigger guard, cylinder latch, trigger plunger, and trigger link plunger. It has to be one of these parts. The most notorious are the hole for the trigger link plunger and the nose of the trigger plunger.

You may have noticed .... I moved your post from pistols to revolvers.
 

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Thanks

Iowegan; thanks. I'll be taking the GP apart again:) and find the culprit. :)
I want the reset as slick as the pull:)
 

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GP100 Trigger drag with let-off:I do have an issue. Pull trigger to fire:) letting trigger off for re-set; not good.
Grinding, rough, dragging. Happens with slow to medium let off. Thanks in advance
Here's a copy/paste of info I posted to another Forum member a while back. It is pertinent to helping with the situation you describe:

When I did a "clean-up/slick-up" on the internals of my newly purchased GP100, I spent a _LOT_ of time working on the area of the trigger return spring, the bore that it traveled in, the trigger link plunger, and the trigger link. I now have a 10 lb trigger return spring installed. OEM spring is 12 lb, I think. With this 10 lb spring, neither myself nor others who shoot my GP100.......are able to "outrun" the trigger. Even when "dry firing". It now _always_ returns nicely, smoothly, and quickly.

The first time I dismantled that area of the GP, I could see that some sleepy Ruger factory worker had gotten part of his shirt-tail wound up in the trigger return spring! Really!! There was a shredded hunk of fabric wound about the spring. I was surprised that up until then, the trigger HAD returned at all.

My first order of biz was working on the bore that the spring and plunger travelled in. It was 40 miles of ruff road in there. I knocked off the tits and highest chunks with a drill bit, manually. Then went to work with dowels and matchsticks and emery paper. This was VERY time consuming, cuz it was so ruff in there, and I was also concerned about making that bore oversize. After the emery paper, I made a series of snug fitting "laps", and lapped the bore with ever-decreasing grit sizes. Finished with a tiny home-made swab doused with BRASSO. Man, it was beautiful in there now!!

Next I worked on the plunger itself. The OD of the plunger was smooth, and it was round, but both ends, especially the front end, was burred. I made a fixture to hold the plunger, got out the eye loupe, and went to work smoothing and chamfering the ends. Did a final polish with a hard Arkansas stone. Now that plunger slid back and forth in the bore just as smooth and slick as can be!

Next I polished the OD of the spring in my lathe, and also dressed the "snaggy" ends of the spring. That part went quick.

The trigger link was stoned and buffed, and where it engaged the end of the plunger, I lapped the link and plunger together.

This is what worked for me.....and continues to work for me, as I slowly and cautiously tweak other areas of my GP100.

FJ Lee Denver CO
 

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I am working on this very issue right now. My GP worked fine, but I wanted to make sure the trigger was as smooth as possible before I put in lighter springs. I now do not get trigger reset about 1 out of 10 times (all I have to do is lightly push the trigger forward or barely touch the cylinder, and it resets).

I have already gone for a second run at the trigger plunger. I will go for a second run at the the hole where the trigger link plunger goes.

I was very cautious as I used light sand paper on all the parts that I worked on (using the IBOK as my guide).

My question is, could I have taken too much off of the trigger plunger? The timing seems fine, so I don't think I have made it too short. I don't think that I changed its shape at all, but is this possible with just some light sanding? Will I run the risk of changing its shape if I get a little more aggressive on the top part of the "arrow"? It feels smooth to the touch right now, though I would not say that it looks like chrome.
 

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In the IBOK for the sp 101, Iowegan mentions the pawl. However, he possibly didn’t put enough emphasis on this item (part # 30).

If you open the cylinder, and then push the cylinder release forward (this will take some effort) and fool the frame into thinking the cylinder is closed. Now cock the hammer back. If you look at the underside of the pawl, you will probably see some bright areas where the pawl is rubbing on the frame. This underside needs to be polished up all the way to the tip.

Now, if you pull and hold the trigger and let the hammer fall slowly, you will still see the pawl still extended. Now if you slowly release the trigger, you might be able to see how this item may be causing a trigger reset problem. It certainly did with mine.

Chris
 

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In the IBOK for the sp 101, Iowegan mentions the pawl. However, he possibly didn’t put enough emphasis on this item (part # 30).

If you open the cylinder, and then push the cylinder release forward (this will take some effort) and fool the frame into thinking the cylinder is closed. Now cock the hammer back. If you look at the underside of the pawl, you will probably see some bright areas where the pawl is rubbing on the frame. This underside needs to be polished up all the way to the tip.

Now, if you pull and hold the trigger and let the hammer fall slowly, you will still see the pawl still extended. Now if you slowly release the trigger, you might be able to see how this item may be causing a trigger reset problem. It certainly did with mine.

Chris

Thanks! I will check on that the next time I dive in.
 

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Might have a chance to work on it tonight. Does anybody have an opinion on the question of whether or not I can take too much off of the "arrow" of the cylinder plunger with fine sandpaper. I know from the IBOK that I don't want to make the tip of it too short, but what about the leading edge of the arrow. Can I adversely change the angle of the top front edge with fine sandpaper?
 

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cruelshoes, If you take much off the "arrow", your initial timing will be affected. This means the cylinder won't unlock before it tries to rotate. The good news is ... trigger plungers are pretty cheap if you screw one up.
 

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cruelshoes, If you take much off the "arrow", your initial timing will be affected. This means the cylinder won't unlock before it tries to rotate. The good news is ... trigger plungers are pretty cheap if you screw one up.
Thanks much. I was going to go ahead and buy one, but thought I would give the whole thing a third shot at polishing first.
 

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OK, it might be time to buy some new parts, but I don’t know which ones to buy. It is also possible that there is something else I can do. Let me review what has happened so far.

My 20 year old GP-100 has been serving me well, but I decided it was time to prepare for the purchase of some lighter springs. I had already done the IBOK work-over, but had chosen to not take apart the trigger assembly the first time around. I decided that I was ready for the next step.

I took apart the trigger assembly for the first time and worked on the parts with fine sand paper. None of them had obviously rough edges, so I was purposely not too aggressive, figuring that I would rather do too little than too much. The parts I worked on were: Cylinder latch, Pawl, the hole in trigger guard (where the trigger link plunger goes), and the trigger plunger.

When I put everything back together, I had developed a trigger reset problem. About 1 in 10 times, the trigger would not reset on its own. I would either have to push forward on the trigger, or barely touch the cylinder to get it to reset.

Last night I went back in for round two. I polished the “arrow” on the trigger plunger until it looked like chrome. I did more thorough polishing on the underside of the cylinder latch. I polished up the left side, and the underside of the top of the pawl. I also spent a good amount of time polishing the inside of the hole in the trigger guard. I did do just a little bit of touching up on the trigger link, though that did not seem too need it.

When I put everything back together, I now have a worse trigger reset problem. The trigger will not reset on its own 3/4 of the time. When I go to reset it myself, it seems like I have to put just a little bit more effort into pushing the trigger forward, or spinning the cylinder (it is not hard to do, just take more that the “touch” that it did before).

I am confused. I do not think that the trigger plunger is too short, because the initial timing is just fine. I also noticed that when I work the trigger before putting it back in the gun, that the plunger sits straight. I do not know if the trigger should reset when it is not in the gun, but it does not do so (i.e. When trigger is totally reassembled, except with transfer bar, and not snapped back into the frame, the trigger guard latch spring does not put out enough energy to push the trigger plunger past the bottom of the cylinder latch).

I am on a tight budget, and don’t want to buy too many more parts than I have to. I am not even sure which parts to buy. Here are some candidates I have thought of: Trigger Plunger (KH03200), Cylinder latch (KH04504), Latch plunger spring (KH05000), Pawl (KT00700).

Thanks for any help you all can give, and sorry for the very long post.
 

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This may seem very simplistic, but Murphy may be involved.

Referring to the IBOK !

Is it possible you mixed up items number 30 and number 5?

If you look at the drawing closely, there are a number of items with the same label number. Notice that the springs under these items are of the same number, but the actual plungers are different. Since I’ve not taken mine apart to check the differences, I can’t say what these differences may be, but the fact they are labeled differently, tells me there are differences.

Have a look at the hammer. Item number 5 (plunger) appears. Now the trigger group. Item number 5 appears again. This tells me that these plungers are the same. However, plunger number 30 (in the trigger group) tells me this plunger is different, even though the springs underneath them are the same.

Just trying to help,

Chris
 

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This may seem very simplistic, but Murphy may be involved.

Referring to the IBOK !

Is it possible you mixed up items number 30 and number 5?

If you look at the drawing closely, there are a number of items with the same label number. Notice that the springs under these items are of the same number, but the actual plungers are different. Since I’ve not taken mine apart to check the differences, I can’t say what these differences may be, but the fact they are labeled differently, tells me there are differences.

Have a look at the hammer. Item number 5 (plunger) appears. Now the trigger group. Item number 5 appears again. This tells me that these plungers are the same. However, plunger number 30 (in the trigger group) tells me this plunger is different, even though the springs underneath them are the same.

Just trying to help,

Chris
Great thinking, but that is not it. Part number 30 is a bit longer than part number 5. I have part number 30 in the correct hole. It took a lot of thought to come up with that possible explanation thought, thanks!
 

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OK.....I’m grasping at straws here, but it may be worth a try. If you can’t find the problem with this, I’m out of ideas.

Remove the hammer spring. Now slowly cock the hammer about half way until you hear the first click. That click is the cylinder lock being released. Stop there and slowly let the hammer back down. The click you hear is the reset of the cylinder lock. Not only should this reset every time, but the trigger should travel fully forward under it’s own power. Next, pointing the barrel straight up, fully cock the hammer. Pull the trigger and move the hammer forward JUST ENOUGH to release the SA sear then release the trigger. Slowly let the hammer down and the trigger should move fully forward under it’s own power. What you are looking for here is complete smoothness throughout the entire hammer/trigger travel. Do this numerous times and see if you can feel any differences in the pressure of the trigger return spring. Even if you cannot feel any differences, it does NOT mean that there isn’t an issue here with the spring strength.

Again fully cock the hammer (barrel pointed down now), pull the trigger and let the hammer fall fully forward under gravity, just as the hammer return spring would do. You should even see the hammer bounce a little against the firing pin spring. Slowly release the trigger and again it should come fully forward each time. This is most likely where the problem is. Do this numerous times and see if you fail to get a reset of both the cylinder lock and the hammer.

After all this, all things being equal, you should get a failure to reset. If so, then remove the hammer and check the action and strength of part numbers 4, 5, and 20. The action should be smooth. This is also an area that can easily collect crud, and could probably stand a good wash and relube, especially in an older gun, and check for burrs.

If this doesn’t help find the problem, I’m fresh out of ideas without having the gun in my hands.

Good Luck,

Chris
 

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OK.....I’m grasping at straws here, but it may be worth a try. If you can’t find the problem with this, I’m out of ideas.

Remove the hammer spring. Now slowly cock the hammer about half way until you hear the first click. That click is the cylinder lock being released. Stop there and slowly let the hammer back down. The click you hear is the reset of the cylinder lock. Not only should this reset every time, but the trigger should travel fully forward under it’s own power. Next, pointing the barrel straight up, fully cock the hammer. Pull the trigger and move the hammer forward JUST ENOUGH to release the SA sear then release the trigger. Slowly let the hammer down and the trigger should move fully forward under it’s own power. What you are looking for here is complete smoothness throughout the entire hammer/trigger travel. Do this numerous times and see if you can feel any differences in the pressure of the trigger return spring. Even if you cannot feel any differences, it does NOT mean that there isn’t an issue here with the spring strength.

Again fully cock the hammer (barrel pointed down now), pull the trigger and let the hammer fall fully forward under gravity, just as the hammer return spring would do. You should even see the hammer bounce a little against the firing pin spring. Slowly release the trigger and again it should come fully forward each time. This is most likely where the problem is. Do this numerous times and see if you fail to get a reset of both the cylinder lock and the hammer.

After all this, all things being equal, you should get a failure to reset. If so, then remove the hammer and check the action and strength of part numbers 4, 5, and 20. The action should be smooth. This is also an area that can easily collect crud, and could probably stand a good wash and relube, especially in an older gun, and check for burrs.

If this doesn’t help find the problem, I’m fresh out of ideas without having the gun in my hands.

Good Luck,

Chris
Thanks much. I will give that all a try before I buy anything.
 

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Well, I had trigger reset problems with every test, except the first one (... slowly cock the hammer about half way until you hear the first click ... Stop there and slowly let the hammer back down.)

It seems like the hammer dog (art 20) moves just fine, though it is a mess underneath. I did not know that that hammer dog would affect trigger reset. I have tried to dress the part, and have been thinking of replacing it anyway. It is so rough that it is hard to really make look right without drastic measures. I guess it can't hurt anything to grind away on it and just replace it with whatever else I must replace.
 

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Oh well, I did the extra work on the hammer dog. Still no trigger reset. But I did make an interesting discovery. I have perfect trigger reset every time if I swing out the cylinder and fool the gun in to thinking it is in by moving cylinder release latch.
 

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In my case, it was all about the trigger plunger. The more I examined my GP, the more I suspected that the trigger plunger was the key. When I got my new trigger plunger and compared it to the old, I knew I was right. I did not make the part "too short," but I had changed the angle on the leading edge of it. My initial timing was fine, but because of the changed angle, I was not getting trigger reset well enough. With the new part, it works fine. Thank you all for your help.
 
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