Ruger Forum banner

1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
43 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
This happens with maybe 1 in 25 cartridges. I found Iowegan's post on the matter and took his advice, taking down the top step down.

After I did so, I realized I might've really screwed the pooch.

I tried to keep the angle of the top step the same...but I'm not sure if I succeeded. What angle should the face of the top step be at? Or does it matter all that much?

If I have fubared my hammer, will Ruger even touch the gun at this point in terms of repairs?

I own 4 handguns, and none of them work. Between 2 CZs, a 1911, this GP100, I don't have a single pistol that I'd trust my life too. Not one. I've got to get at least one of these things to the point I can count it if I should ever need it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
730 Posts
darken the frame where the hammer hits with black magic marker , dry fire a few times & you`ll see if the hammer is "square" with the frame .

Remember ya only got `bout .020 before capturing the transfer bar !

I use the 10# trigger & the 12# hammer springs that1s as lite as I feel 100% with !!

Also shimmin the hammer will stop any frame drag on the hammers stroke.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
317 Posts
I'll have toread his post, but the CCI has some of the thinnest cups out there.
Some have more sensitive priming compound and they do change things from time to time.

John K
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
43 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
darken the frame where the hammer hits with black magic marker , dry fire a few times & you`ll see if the hammer is "square" with the frame .

Remember ya only got `bout .020 before capturing the transfer bar !

I use the 10# trigger & the 12# hammer springs that1s as lite as I feel 100% with !!

Also shimmin the hammer will stop any frame drag on the hammers stroke.
Upon examining my frame, I found that the hammer wasn't "square" with the frame from the factory. The marks where the finish was worn away on the frame were heavily favoring the left side of the frame. I don't have access to machine tools, so I couldn't get the hammer hitting perfectly square, but I got it very, very close. It also doesn't strike with the entire hammer step...but then again, it wasn't from the factory either. I guess it won't be a problem in terms of frame and hammer longevity. At least Ruger must not think so, considering how off center the hammer was striking out of the box. In any case, it's now improved over it's original condition.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
730 Posts
Upon examining my frame, I found that the hammer wasn't "square" with the frame from the factory. The marks where the finish was worn away on the frame were heavily favoring the left side of the frame. I don't have access to machine tools, so I couldn't get the hammer hitting perfectly square, but I got it very, very close. It also doesn't strike with the entire hammer step...but then again, it wasn't from the factory either. I guess it won't be a problem in terms of frame and hammer longevity. At least Ruger must not think so, considering how off center the hammer was striking out of the box. In any case, it's now improved over it's original condition.
Agreed^^^!!!! , I would really like to see a GP/SP or super Redhawk assembled just to see how little time is spent "handfittin" parts !!!
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
317 Posts
Not much, opps, maybe I'm wrong, ruger does have such great QC.
At least that's what I am told by many. But having no real experience, so what would I know ?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,706 Posts
Without machines it is near to impossible to create a perfectly flat and square face. Even with machines it is pretty damn hard! Machinists will place the emery cloth on a granite or other known flat surface and use soft circular stokes with some lubrication (water/oil/etc.) to gentle reduce the dimension. There will be some degree of angle cut as it would be impossible to stay exactly parallel but this should not be a problem. Don’t worry about about a slight angle of contact on the face of the step. You must verify that you did not take too much metal off of the top step of your hammer.

The top step of the hammer is there to limit the hammer travel so that it does not contact the firing pin when the transfer bar is not engaged. Theoretically, a flat plane is determined by three points and the reason I bring that up is to explain that it is not important that the hammer top step face be square with the impact zone. What is important is that the hammer does not strike the firing pin unless the transfer bar is in place.

This is pretty easy to check visually. I feel obliged to tell you to ensure the firearm is unloaded. Cock the hammer and place your thumb on the hammer spur holding it firmly. While holding the hammer spur, pull the trigger and then slowly move the hammer in about 1/8 to ¼ of its travel. Look sideways through the cylinder gap at the area between the top chamber and the frame where the firing pin is located. Release the trigger to release the transfer bar engagement and slowly move the hammer to the end of its travel. The firing pin should not have been visible at any time. Try this a few more times but let the hammer go after the transfer bar is disengaged so the hammer strikes the stop hard. Again, you should see no movement of the firing pin.

If the firing pin is not activated without the transfer bar, the gun should be safe to use but I would recommend you try it at a range or other safe shooting area. Remember, your safety and those around you is your top concern so if you are not sure that the hammer is safe to use, send it to Ruger or bring it to a gunsmith or see if you can get a new hammer and replace it yourself. As far as the light strikes are concerned, I cannot offer any help. You may have fixed that issue already. Good luck!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
43 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Without machines it is near to impossible to create a perfectly flat and square face. Even with machines it is pretty damn hard! Machinists will place the emery cloth on a granite or other known flat surface and use soft circular stokes with some lubrication (water/oil/etc.) to gentle reduce the dimension. There will be some degree of angle cut as it would be impossible to stay exactly parallel but this should not be a problem. Don’t worry about about a slight angle of contact on the face of the step. You must verify that you did not take too much metal off of the top step of your hammer.

The top step of the hammer is there to limit the hammer travel so that it does not contact the firing pin when the transfer bar is not engaged. Theoretically, a flat plane is determined by three points and the reason I bring that up is to explain that it is not important that the hammer top step face be square with the impact zone. What is important is that the hammer does not strike the firing pin unless the transfer bar is in place.

This is pretty easy to check visually. I feel obliged to tell you to ensure the firearm is unloaded. Cock the hammer and place your thumb on the hammer spur holding it firmly. While holding the hammer spur, pull the trigger and then slowly move the hammer in about 1/8 to ¼ of its travel. Look sideways through the cylinder gap at the area between the top chamber and the frame where the firing pin is located. Release the trigger to release the transfer bar engagement and slowly move the hammer to the end of its travel. The firing pin should not have been visible at any time. Try this a few more times but let the hammer go after the transfer bar is disengaged so the hammer strikes the stop hard. Again, you should see no movement of the firing pin.

If the firing pin is not activated without the transfer bar, the gun should be safe to use but I would recommend you try it at a range or other safe shooting area. Remember, your safety and those around you is your top concern so if you are not sure that the hammer is safe to use, send it to Ruger or bring it to a gunsmith or see if you can get a new hammer and replace it yourself. As far as the light strikes are concerned, I cannot offer any help. You may have fixed that issue already. Good luck!
All appears to be in order with respect to the firing pin. No contact between the hammer and FP is occurring without the transfer bar being engaged.

Light primer hits have stopped as well. This turned out to be an issue with excessive crud getting into the hammer channel from firing lots and lots of cast lead bullets and a too weak hammer spring.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
170 Posts
Upon examining my frame, I found that the hammer wasn't "square" with the frame from the factory. The marks where the finish was worn away on the frame were heavily favoring the left side of the frame.
I think you have demonstrated the importance of having a close and careful look at things before tearing into them, replacing parts and filing away metal. I don't know whether the hammer to frame interference is due to the hammer pin hole drilled out-of-square, or if the frame's hammer cutout is not centered in the frame, or that the hammer face is off center - could be all of these. Sounds like you are on your way to solving the problem, anyway.

Eor
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
170 Posts
Without machines it is near to impossible to create a perfectly flat and square face. Even with machines it is pretty damn hard! Machinists will place the emery cloth on a granite or other known flat surface and use soft circular stokes with some lubrication (water/oil/etc.) to gentle reduce the dimension. There will be some degree of angle cut as it would be impossible to stay exactly parallel but this should not be a problem. Don’t worry about about a slight angle of contact on the face of the step. You must verify that you did not take too much metal off of the top step of your hammer.
All quite true enough. Fortunately, there are few times when a perfectly flat and true part is actually needed. What is needed, on the other hand, is for a particular part to operate smoothly in a particular assembly. That is where hand-fitting, adjustment and - dare I say it - QC - come into the picture.

On my own GP's, the hammer cutout in the frame was obviously not centered on the axis of the firearm - at least in the area of the firing pin. Since the hammer face struck the transfer bar and firing pin on center, there was really nothing wrong with the hammer shape. In this case (others will probably be different) I had to open up one side of the frame cutout near the firing pin (careful filing). That adjustment made room for the hammer to fall freely all the way to the frame. Again, observation comes to the rescue.

Eor
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,202 Posts
I'm glad you got it working 100%, and found the source of the problem. I know how frustrating it gets when a gun develops a "gremlin", I have had to work out my share of them in various guns of all makers.

My Colt King Cobra has the exact same issue, maybe one ot two rounds out of every few cylinder fulls needs a double tap to go off. All the springs seem stock, still have no idea what's going on. Pretty annoying, firing a DA string at the range and it's like BANG BANG click....I rarely fire this revolver, certainly don't trust it for anything serious.

Basically by squaring the hammer off you finished the job that should have been done by a Ruger tech.

I have learned to stop looking at the fit and finish of my Rugers in the same light as I used to when I was seeking out older S&W's. I have had to tweak a few of my GP's and Sixes, added a few endshake bearings to some that seem to have left the factory with a bit of "slop", others earned that slop from countless hot magnums, but my main goal with any Ruger is 100% functionality over any cosmetic issues. One of my GP's kept "hanging up" when I would close the cylinder,I had to pretty much force it in, couldn't for the life of me find out why. There was a casting burr on the recoil plate where the cylinder retaining pin compresses on closing, so I had to file it down. Doesn't look pretty in this area now, but it works!

A lot of my Rugers are rough around the edges, especially internally and in the recoil plate area, but the revolvers do their intended job and do it well!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
I'll have toread his post, but the CCI has some of the thinnest cups out there.
Some have more sensitive priming compound and they do change things from time to time.

John K
John,

I think you have that backward. CCI and Winchester are the hardest cups and the least sensitive compount. Federal has the softest cups and most sensitive compound.

That is why the Lee Auto Prime strongly recomends only CCI and Winchester primers. If the one you are inserting goes off, the remainder in the tray will not with CCI and Winchester.

TC
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top