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Dummy Rounds problems

There i nothing wrong with the GP100 (according to what was reported). Dummy rounds are "loose" in the chamber and are used mostly to learn how to speed load with the barrel (and cylinders pointed down). Revolvers do not actually go into battery like semi auto. The semi auto round is pushed into the chamber from a magazine and the pistol will not fire until the round is chambered (and "indexes" on the chamber) A revolver round has a rim and is already in chamber. It fires when the chamber is aligned with the forcing cone and the hammer falls onto the primer. But a revolver (especially Ruger and other high quality revolvers have very close tolerances (and will not cycle a high primer cartridge into place (it seems jammed ..but revolvers do not jam).. it will not rotate a defective round into position. So now you are learning something about ROUNDS .. they need to be very close tolerance. Steel cases are not smooth . so then they fire they seem glued into the chamber (its true).. Brass cases are better (less friction) Nickle plated cases have the least friction .. and some action pistoleros polish the insides of the chamber to have less friction (upon ejection). Dirty casings, improperly sized casings, defective casings will all give a revolver trouble. Be very careful (then) if you need the revolver to perform .. about the rounds you are using. (needless to say we need to be careful about powder measures and bullet types and weights) The GP100 is an excellent revolver and I will never part with my Match Champion GP100 .. it's perfect. (so are others but mine at least is). Good luck with that GP100
 

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I to avoid steel like the plague in all my firearms. Steel casings against a steel cylinder or chamber just doesn't seem right. It has got to cause more damage to the steel in your firearm than brass over time. I do not own not even 1 steel case round for any of my firearms. If you want to use it be my guest! I will not!
 

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Discussion Starter #23
I to avoid steel like the plague in all my firearms. Steel casings against a steel cylinder or chamber just doesn't seem right. It has got to cause more damage to the steel in your firearm than brass over time. I do not own not even 1 steel case round for any of my firearms. If you want to use it be my guest! I will not!
Do you shoot 7.62x39? Most of that is steel case. I am thinking the SKS, and AK47's are designed for that. I shoot steel case in my AR47's. I would think they are designed for that also.
 

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I think it's also because the steel cases have a lacquer coating that tends to get warmed up when fired. This combined with any expansion of the case can make extraction more difficult. I've heard people firing a large number of steel case rounds out of ARs and AKs sometimes having extraction problems as the barrel/chamber get hot - more so on ARs as they seem to be a little tighter chamber than the AKs.

So if the cases slide out when the revolver is tilted upward, do they slide back in if tilted downward? I've never had rotation problems with mine, and I can't say that the cases that have been fired have ever provided any type of interference with rotation - not sure what they would catch on the back face as there is a sloped surface on the fired side that should push the case back into the cylinder. I guess it might wedge at some point if the fired cases aren't able to move back into the cylinder, but I can't imagine why brass cased ammo would be that tight in the cylinder, even once fired. Is there a lot of residue build up in the cylinder? Hope he didn't bend something by "pounding" out the cases.
 

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I run steel cased ammo in my AK. It's 'made for it'. Runs like a CHAMP. Agree with others, why put junk ammo in a GP and then expect the world from it. Where's that 'bang head here' emoji when I need it? ;)
 

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Discussion Starter #26
I think it's also because the steel cases have a lacquer coating that tends to get warmed up when fired. This combined with any expansion of the case can make extraction more difficult. I've heard people firing a large number of steel case rounds out of ARs and AKs sometimes having extraction problems as the barrel/chamber get hot - more so on ARs as they seem to be a little tighter chamber than the AKs.
Most is polymer coated anymore in the pistol. Your problem is carbon passing the case. The stuff he shot got stuck the first time. So it is not the problem in my opinion.

https://www.ar15.com/forums/AR-15/-ARCHIVED-THREAD-Do-polymer-coated-steel-casings-cause-more-wear-to-a-barrel-chamber-than-brass-/16-715340/?page=2

"While I agree with several of your points, I do not on several.....

I thought the whole idea of "The polymer coating on the case is melting and causing jams" was instead debunked by the idea that the steel cases were NOT expanding as a brass case would. So instead of sealing as well as brass that instead the steel would not. So that would allow carbon etc to get in the chamber, more so than brass.
But you have decided that isn't the case...............? "

The same applies to aluminum case if you've ever shot it. It comes out with black carbon streaks from the gas going past the case. I am moving away from polymer coated ammo for my AR47's going to the lacquered stuff. 2 reasons.
1. lacquer lasts longer in storage
2. the lacquered stuff I am buying has the red or purple lacquer sealant on the projectile and the primer.
 

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Discussion Starter #27
Turns out the 3rd shooter there noted the steel case were bulged back towards the rim. That caused the problem. He and I were talking about it last week and he dropped that little gem of info.

AFA people that bash steel in other weapons the coating doesn't melt and collect in the chamber. It's the expansion characteristics of the case and the soot that builds up in there.
 

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Seems I may be in the minority. I run steel case (and aluminum) ammo through my 9mms (SIG, Glock, S&W, and Taurus) as well as my Mini 30 and ARs. None of them give me any issues if I do not let them get too hot from repetitive shooting.

I prefer brass, but have shot more steel than I can remember.
 

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Discussion Starter #29
Seems I may be in the minority. I run steel case Mini 30 and ARs. None of them give me any issues if I do not let them get too hot from repetitive shooting.
I was looking into the Mini30 as an alternative to the AK47. The early ones were $900-ish at the time and didn't like steel. To me what's the point in not being able to shoot steel case in 7.62x39? I discovered the wonderful world of AR47 instead, never looked back! ;)
 

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I was looking into the Mini30 as an alternative to the AK47. The early ones were $900-ish at the time and didn't like steel. To me what's the point in not being able to shoot steel case in 7.62x39? I discovered the wonderful world of AR47 instead, never looked back! ;)
I started my 7.62 soviet affair with an SKS. It was $79 worth of lumber and steel pipe. Then to be even more politically incorrect, I bought an AK 47. It was around $175 and a hoot, but accuracy was not in its design. These 2 rifles showed me that I really enjoy shooting military hardware.

When Ruger chambered the fun little Mini in 7.62x39, made it in stainless, made it reasonably accurate, and made it easy to mount a scope on I had to have it. I paid $400 for it new, that is how long I have owned it. I would give up a lot of my guns before the Mini 30.

I love my ARs also; however, my HBAR and M4 are both 5.56.
 

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This is funny??? I ran into the very same problem with the Blazer Aluminum Cased stuff many years back, also with Ruger revolvers (Smith as well). One or two rounds and you could kick them out, but a cylinder full? Forget it! I ended up only using Blazer Aluminum in semi-auto guns. The blow back was enough for a single round and it worked perfectly. Smithy.
 

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Yes, with semi-auto, only one case at a time in ejected while on a revolver, a cylinder full of empties has to be dealt with.
 

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I've never had oportunity to shoot the Wolf steel cased stuff (although I did have a mini-30 for a time, just never shot the stuff). Aren't those steel cases waxed or varnished so they don't oxidize? Maybe the protective coating is the root of the problem? I don't know what you'd do to fix that however???? Smithy.
 

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Discussion Starter #35
I've never had oportunity to shoot the Wolf steel cased stuff (although I did have a mini-30 for a time, just never shot the stuff). Aren't those steel cases waxed or varnished so they don't oxidize? Maybe the protective coating is the root of the problem? I don't know what you'd do to fix that however???? Smithy.
In this instance it was a bulge at the base of the case. Most steel case it's usually polymer coated. The supposedly longer lasting coating is lacquer coated. I have seen some zinc coated. The problems in auto loaders comes from the steel not sealing against the chamber wall and the soot it collects as it passes by the case.
 

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Discussion Starter #36
Gunsmith at the seller said the chambers aren't consistent. I think Ruger has him a new cylinder coming. Gunsmith said the quality is crap lately. We shall see.
 

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About the recoil situation: the gun will recoil back, before the cartridges will. Thus, the cases will not be moving to the rear, causing a jam.
If the crane is bent (from pounding), that is something quite serious. Hope Ruger ignores the misuse and repairs it.
Just to keep things straight the case actually slams against the frame and if pressures are high enough the primer can flow around the firing pin.
 
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