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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Put Wolf springs in my GP. 9# hammer and 10# trigger. It's now as smooth as a gravy sandwich!!! Now need more range time to get used to the new trigger. Trigger pull is now right there with my Smith.
I use Win and CCI primers. So far NO FTF or hang fires......
 

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I bought the Wolff Value Pack and went down only one "size" on the hammer spring. I believe that was a 12# hammer spring. I am too worried about function. Give us a range report when you can!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Straightwall,

Like you I was worried about the reliability issue. I shoot ONLY my reloads and sometimes some of the primers go in a little further than I like. After 200 rounds, absolutely NO issues with ignition. It's my backup Home Defense Gun so I take its reliability very seriously.
The action is very smooth. Now all I need now is a trigger stop and hammer shims........
 

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If a guy is willing to troubleshoot imperfect fitment of the lockwork, then you'll have no problem running 9lb mainspring and 8lb trigger reset spring.

Buy the Wolff kit, try the lightest spring. If it gives you inconsistent ignition or trigger reset, either fix the problem inside, or go up in spring weight.

Ruger uses heavy springs because they know their mass production process - which make the guns very affordable - leaves imperfect fitment inside. To ensure their guns are affordable AND reliable, they add spring weight. If you fix those fitment issues, you can tune down the springs a LONG ways.
 

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How low of spring weight that you can use on your GP100 will variy by each revolver. My 5 inch GP runs 8 lb trigger return and 9 lb hammer springs and never misses a beat. My 3 inch GP trigger would not re-set reliably unless I moved up to a 10 lb trigger return spring. If the revolver is to be used for personal defense purposes, I would personally stick with stock springs.
 

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My GP100 has been the recipient of some excellent gunsmithing and action clean-up, so I was able to go (after experimentation) with the Wolff 11 lb mainspring and 8 lb trigger return spring. I started with a 12 lb, then went down to 10 lb-and experienced sporadic/occasional light strikes on Remington primers (I use Remington/UMC 125 gr .38 Special +P SJHP for practice and competition, and Remington Golden Saber .38 Special 125 gr +P for carry), so I installed an 11 lb mainspring, and have had 100% performance with it (but I have a 12 lb as a back-up in the event that any issues do arise with the 11 lb one).

The 11 lb is not part of the Wolff GP100 Shooters Pack-I had to individually order it. Most conventional wisdom stipulates that the 12 lb mainspring and 10 lb trigger return spring are a good across-the-board choice, and going to lighter weights in either may be perfectly do-able, but on a GP100-by-GP100 basis.

A GP100 that has had the internal components and nooks and crannies de-burred and cleaned up and an action job performed by a qualified knowledgeable individual or gunsmith is the best candidate for successfully using the lighter springings with unimpeded operational success, both in my opinion and personal experience.

Best, Jon
 

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Each GP100 is an individual, you may have one fitted by a pro, right after his morning coffee on a Thursday when he's in a great mood looking forward to a week's vacation.......which comes out of the box with a 1950's S&W-like action and will accept 9lb Wolff springs with 0 problems.

Or, you may get the one fitted by the new guy who's hungover after a Thirsty Thursday night out and got in a fight with his wife last night, who just got scolded by his manager for being late and doesn't give a crap, and just wants to make it to punch out time.........this gun will function but may need serious clean up to work with anything but heavy springs.

I love ISMI springs, once you use them in a GP100 that has a decently fitted action you won't go back to Wolff again.......two of my best shooting and slickest GP100's have ISMI springs, and they are slick as pig snot and shoot as well as any revolver out there.
 

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Each GP100 is an individual, you may have one fitted by a pro, right after his morning coffee on a Thursday when he's in a great mood looking forward to a week's vacation.......which comes out of the box with a 1950's S&W-like action and will accept 9lb Wolff springs with 0 problems.

Or, you may get the one fitted by the new guy who's hungover after a Thirsty Thursday night out and got in a fight with his wife last night, who just got scolded by his manager for being late and doesn't give a crap, and just wants to make it to punch out time.........this gun will function but may need serious clean up to work with anything but heavy springs.

I love ISMI springs, once you use them in a GP100 that has a decently fitted action you won't go back to Wolff again.......two of my best shooting and slickest GP100's have ISMI springs, and they are slick as pig snot and shoot as well as any revolver out there.

ExArmy, Can you better quantify the difference in springs between the two companies, please? I looked at ISMI, but went with Wolff due to the better spring descriptions on the Wolff website.

Thanks!
 

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I personally communicated with the owner of ISMI about the spring weights, and he told me some scientific industry-jargon type stuff, basically the springs are factory weight when released, but have a lower "pre load" meaning it takes less pressure to compress them, thus making for a lighter, more even pull. They are 14# in weight when the spring is under full compression and released, as in a DA or SA trigger pull, and the trigger latch spring is the same, it takes less pressure to "load" but then returns the trigger just as snappy as the factory weight. I have not had a single FTF with any primers with the 2 GP100's that have ISMI springs. They are shot-peened after they are coiled, which is supposed to make them more consistent and more durable.

Wolff springs are essentially very high quality springs that are just lower in weight. Wolff makes great springs and a few of my Sixes and GP's have them. There is also a little variance within the Wolff springs, I had a 10# Wolff spring in a GP100, it had FTF's with that one, but then put in a 10# Wilson Combat spring (made by Wolff) and it worked perfectly, maybe the second spring just had an extra 1/2# or so that was what I needed to pop the primers.

I did try ISMI springs in my .22 SP101 and had a few FTF's, the springs are not rated for use with .22's since the .22 SP101 uses a heavier mainspring. I asked but ISMI wouldn't cut me a spring that was a little stronger.

In short, I only play with springs in my "range queen" shooter guns, the Rugers I carry and use for HD all have stock springs. In some cases you don't even need them, I have GP's that shoot better with stock springs than with lighter springs. I also try to avoid the "cap gun trigger" effect from springs that are too light.
 

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After settling on your springs, test results with as many brands / types of ammo as you can. You never know who might end up with your gun (I'm thinking inheritance) can still use it for factory ammo in self-defense situations.
Pull weight alone does not make for a good trigger. A second aspect of it is the feel (gritty or smooth) and evenness through the pull (stacking). Trigger pull distance is a third factor, but we can't change it.
 

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Heavier springs can "mask" grittiness, which can be a good thing.

I'd rather have a heavy but smooth and even trigger than a lighter pull that feels like a 4 stage DA pull through sandpaper.
 
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